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View Full Version : If you discovered a planet, what would you name it?



TheOneYouSeek
2009-Nov-13, 12:34 PM
If I discoverd one I think I sould name it Niburu just for fun. :p

AndreasJ
2009-Nov-13, 12:37 PM
George.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Nov-13, 12:41 PM
Bob

jokergirl
2009-Nov-13, 12:49 PM
You can't name a planet Bob!

I don't know - how cool is it? I'd probably look at its features and think of something fitting.

;)

Paul Beardsley
2009-Nov-13, 12:54 PM
If I discoverd one I think I sould name it Miburu just for fun. :p

Is that a typo for Niburu, or is this some deeper joke that I don't understand?

Anyway, my answer is Kevin. I thought I was being really clever coming up with that, only to discover everybody else had thought of the same sort of thing already.

TheOneYouSeek
2009-Nov-13, 12:58 PM
ops it's a typo. :P

Lianachan
2009-Nov-13, 01:27 PM
Probably Loki. The Norse pantheon is insufficiently represented.

closetgeek
2009-Nov-13, 02:32 PM
If I could ever understand the new name that Bastian gives the Empress, I would name the new planet that. If not, I would just go with Bastian.

megrfl
2009-Nov-13, 02:44 PM
Bunsen.

Romanus
2009-Nov-13, 02:48 PM
I'd name it the "Second Final Planet", just to mess with the public's mind.

Dgennero
2009-Nov-13, 02:51 PM
Since all planets are named after the Roman version of the major Greco-Roman gods, I'd stick with that.
The twelve Olympics are: Jupiter, Juno, Neptune, Ceres, Mars, Mercury, Vulcan, Venus, Minerva, Apollo, Diana and Vesta.

All names of these are already occupied, but Minerva doesn't seem to be the name of a very well known object, so it'd be Minerva or one of the titans, Crius for example, as presented in Hesiod's theogony.

Larry Jacks
2009-Nov-13, 05:32 PM
Mine

mike alexander
2009-Nov-13, 05:35 PM
Jerry Lewis.

Think how happy the French would be.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Nov-13, 05:50 PM
Polanski, think how happy the Americans...

Paul Beardsley
2009-Nov-13, 06:06 PM
If the planet was a double (i.e. had a substantial moon) and one or both were craggy and they had a very eccentric orbit, I'd name them Mike and Alexander.

No particular reason.

weatherc
2009-Nov-13, 06:18 PM
I would name it a particularly nasty swear word, just so that people would have to find all sorts of ways to avoid printing or saying the full name.

Gillianren
2009-Nov-13, 06:22 PM
I would name it after a goddess for a change, though which one, I haven't really thought about.

Perikles
2009-Nov-13, 06:22 PM
Twinkle

That would kill that stupid song, or force somebody to find a word that rhymes with 'planet'

Buttercup
2009-Nov-13, 06:24 PM
Tralfaz. :)

Cruithne3753
2009-Nov-13, 06:29 PM
If I discoverd one I think I sould name it Niburu just for fun. :p

Hopefully someone will in 2013 (http://www.bautforum.com/bad-astronomy-media/94834-were-not-only-ones-fighting-2012-nonsense-2.html#post1620412)

Always seemed a waste of a good name to me anyway...

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Nov-13, 06:29 PM
I would name it after a goddess for a change, though which one, I haven't really thought about.

For a change? Venus, Ceres, Sedna, and Eris are all goddesses.

A popular choice in older sci-fi for a trans-Neptunian planet name was Persephone, which would have been a good name but was taken by an asteroid instead.

Nick

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Nov-13, 06:36 PM
Twinkle

That would kill that stupid song, or force somebody to find a word that rhymes with 'planet'

Twinkle, Twinkle, little planet,
I wonder if you're made of granite.
Wandering in your distant orbit,
Faster than the quickest rabbit.
Twinkle, Twinkle, little planet,
I wonder if you're made of granite.

Nick

Buttercup
2009-Nov-13, 06:48 PM
:lol: Nick...

Perikles
2009-Nov-13, 07:11 PM
Twinkle, Twinkle, little planet,
I wonder if you're made of granite.
Wandering in your distant orbit,
Faster than the quickest rabbit.
Twinkle, Twinkle, little planet,
I wonder if you're made of granite.
Plus two points for planet ... granite
Minus ten points for orbit .. rabbit

Nick Theodorakis
2009-Nov-13, 07:12 PM
:lol: Nick...

Well, thankee. I'll be sure to name the next planet I discover "Buttercup."

Nick

Perikles
2009-Nov-13, 07:14 PM
For a change? Venus, Ceres, Sedna, and Eris are all goddesses.

NickYeh. And Saturn has Rhea.

Not surprising that Eris is female, is it?

(Eris = strife BTW)

Gillianren
2009-Nov-13, 07:17 PM
For a change? Venus, Ceres, Sedna, and Eris are all goddesses.

I'll give you Venus, and it's true that Ceres was originally considered to be a "real" planet, but goddess names weren't considered, so far as I know, for Uranus, Neptune, or Pluto. (Of course, better than George.) It's also true that Gaea was considered a goddess. However, essentially all the lights in the sky which have names known by the general public are given male names. (Moons don't count, for what I think are obvious reasons.) I'd also say that most people who have heard of Sedna don't know who Sedna is.

On the other hand, I did know (and greatly dislike) a girl called Antares.

KaiYeves
2009-Nov-13, 07:34 PM
Welcome to BAUT, The One You Seek!

Hmmm... I like the idea of a goddess... maybe Artemis, Athena, Juno or Urania (Well, Muses aren't technically goddesses...)

The Backroad Astronomer
2009-Nov-13, 07:51 PM
I would name it davetopia. With the main landmasses named William, Patrick, Jon, Tom, Peter, Colin, Sylvester,Paul, Chrisyopher,David, and Matt. With island chains named Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Checkov, Scotty, Sulu and Uhura. With four islands close to each other called Cat, Lister,Kryten and Rimmer. There would be to penal moons named Mac and PC they would travel at the same speed but always 180 degrees from one another. The cities would be named Carter, Mcneill, Jackson, Hammond, Teal'c, and Mckay.

Buttercup
2009-Nov-13, 08:03 PM
Well, thankee. I'll be sure to name the next planet I discover "Buttercup."

Nick

:D You're so sweet.

swampyankee
2009-Nov-13, 09:02 PM
Trafalmador, of course.

Or -- if that's already used -- Gallifrey

Paul Beardsley
2009-Nov-13, 09:10 PM
With the main landmasses named William, Patrick, Jon, Tom, Peter, Colin, Sylvester,Paul, Chrisyopher,David, and Matt.
What about the other Peter? (Located between William and Patrick.) And Michael? (Located last of all.) And Richard? (Not really anywhere, to be honest.)

Tobin Dax
2009-Nov-13, 09:16 PM
Trafalmador, of course.

Or -- if that's already used -- Gallifrey
Raxacoricofallapatorius

The Backroad Astronomer
2009-Nov-13, 09:17 PM
I know nothing of the other Peter. (Hands over ears yelling I can't hear you.)
Forgot about the Valeyard.

SkepticJ
2009-Nov-13, 09:52 PM
Vishvakarman--the Hindu god of technology

TheOneYouSeek
2009-Nov-13, 11:07 PM
Hopefully someone will in 2013 (http://www.bautforum.com/bad-astronomy-media/94834-were-not-only-ones-fighting-2012-nonsense-2.html#post1620412)

Always seemed a waste of a good name to me anyway... Yes I hope so too :)

To bad that people will just make a new date for it to visit us. :p

mike alexander
2009-Nov-13, 11:46 PM
Ah. After Anoia, The Goddess of Things That Stick in Drawers.

Mykemykemyke
2009-Nov-14, 02:21 AM
Kal-El.

kleindoofy
2009-Nov-14, 02:33 AM
I think I'd call it Your Reflection.

That would lead to some interesting phrases.

Then again And the Oscar goes to wouldn't be bad either.

Gillianren
2009-Nov-14, 02:54 AM
Ah. After Anoia, The Goddess of Things That Stick in Drawers.

Rattle your drawers!

Jens
2009-Nov-14, 09:54 AM
How about Arium? That would make for some interesting confusion as well. "Look, it's the planet Arium!"

Fiery Phoenix
2009-Nov-14, 02:37 PM
Themis, if it was a Jupiter-type gas giant. Syba, if it was a Neptune-type gas giant. Feros, if it was a terrestrial planet.

KaiYeves
2009-Nov-14, 11:19 PM
Polanski, think how happy the Americans...
Think how happy this guy (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_L._Polansky) would be.

mike alexander
2009-Nov-15, 01:54 AM
Elvis.


That does make sense, doesn't it?

Tobin Dax
2009-Nov-15, 02:44 AM
I think I'd call it Your Reflection.

That would lead to some interesting phrases.
:lol: How did I miss this earlier? I can just imagine the headache it would cause me to tell students, "If you look into the telescope, you will see Your Reflection." It could almost be worth it.

swampyankee
2009-Nov-15, 03:36 AM
Elvis.


That does make sense, doesn't it?

He was getting a trifle chubby late in life, but naming a planet "Elvis" would establish a precedent for naming planets after kings, and next thing you know, we'd be naming them after living congress(wo)?men, MP's, and presidents. Even those with the impeccable anti-science credentials.

Kaptain K
2009-Nov-15, 03:29 PM
Snicklefritz. :whistle:

AndreasJ
2009-Nov-15, 03:37 PM
Ah. After Anoia, The Goddess of Things That Stick in Drawers.

The name sounds like she'd be the goddess of mindlessness.

ETA: A trip to the dictionary shows there's indeed a Greek word anoia, meaning "want of understanding, folly" (related to nous "mind", anoos "mindless").

Strange
2009-Nov-15, 03:39 PM
As long as it was big enough to be considered a real planet, then Isimal.

Or X.

Paul Beardsley
2009-Nov-15, 03:55 PM
What about Wellinadvance?

trinitree88
2009-Nov-15, 04:05 PM
Pluto.

Fiery Phoenix
2009-Nov-15, 04:11 PM
^ How ironic! :lol:

KaiYeves
2009-Nov-15, 07:47 PM
He was getting a trifle chubby late in life, but naming a planet "Elvis" would establish a precedent for naming planets after kings, and next thing you know, we'd be naming them after living congress(wo)?men, MP's, and presidents. Even those with the impeccable anti-science credentials.
We did call Uranus "George" for a while...

If it was in the outskirts of our system, I'd name it Mickey, Minnie, Donald, Daisy, Goofy or Jose so Pluto could be with his friends.

Tobin Dax
2009-Nov-15, 08:54 PM
Jose
Who? :confused:

kleindoofy
2009-Nov-15, 09:55 PM
Who?
Josť can you see, by the dawn's ...

Strange
2009-Nov-15, 10:18 PM
Josť can you see, by the dawn's ...

:lol:

DonM435
2009-Nov-16, 01:35 PM
He [Elvis] was getting a trifle chubby late in life, . . .


We used to make jokes about some fat guy's belt beginning to resemble the Equator.

swampyankee
2009-Nov-16, 01:39 PM
Quick, we need a poll!

Which I will not write.

Strange
2009-Nov-16, 01:46 PM
We used to make jokes about some fat guy's belt beginning to resemble the Equator.

When the fat guy in our office went for a post-prandial stroll around the building, we used to joke that you could see the tidal effects in your cup of coffee.

publiusr
2009-Nov-16, 10:29 PM
Looking for his swingline no doubt.

I might go for "Magnus" if it was big enough.

KaiYeves
2009-Nov-16, 11:53 PM
Who?
A little-known Disney character, Donald Duck's Brazilian friend, Jose Carioca (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jos%C3%A9_Carioca).

I threw him in because I love lesser-known characters.

Jens
2009-Nov-17, 03:08 AM
As long as it was big enough to be considered a real planet, then Isimal.

Or X.

Yes, those are good. Or Oid.

JimmyRoberts
2009-Nov-17, 04:43 AM
Odin

mugaliens
2009-Nov-17, 05:55 AM
Sgum :lol:

Ivan Viehoff
2009-Nov-17, 11:42 AM
A popular choice in older sci-fi for a trans-Neptunian planet name was Persephone, which would have been a good name but was taken by an asteroid instead.
Persephone (alias Persephatta or Kore) is the Greek name, and apparently for planets we prefer Roman names when there is a choice. The Latin version is Proserpine, which somehow seems rather uglier.

Persephone was apparently the most popular name for what is now Eris is a poll run by New Scientist in 2005. But it seems once it has been given to something else, you're too late. Which is the most significant transneptunian objects such as Eris, Makemake, Haumea, Sedna, Orcus, Varuna and Quaoar are often given such obscure names - the best names have been used up on a load of relatively insignificant asteroids and minor planetary moons.

djellison
2009-Nov-17, 12:19 PM
Helena - after my other half Helen.

Unless it was a really horrible place - in which case I would probably call it Gordon.

Buttercup
2009-Nov-17, 02:35 PM
My first choice would be (as posted last week) Tralfaz.

My second choice would be Marmelade. :D Even if I don't like the stuff...

Barabino
2009-Nov-17, 06:45 PM
All names of these are already occupied, but Minerva doesn't seem to be the name of a very well known object, so it'd be Minerva or one of the titans, Crius for example, as presented in Hesiod's theogony.

For discerning sci-fi readers, Minerva is the planet that thousands years ago orbited between Mars and Jupiters...

James P.Hogan:

# Inherit The Stars, May 1977
# The Gentle Giants of Ganymede, May 1978

Do not read wikipedia, it contains a spoiler!

I don't recommend the sequels, though...

HenrikOlsen
2009-Nov-17, 08:10 PM
Minerva was also a proposed name for both Uranus and Pluto before their current names were chosen.

Paul Beardsley
2009-Nov-17, 09:38 PM
I believe Minerva was also a fictional Earthlike planet that exists in place of Mars in Harry Turtledove's novel A World of Difference, which I haven't read, although I like the idea. Apparently Viking landed on this planet in 1976, and was promptly bashed by a Minervan.

Speaking of speculative/alternative solar systems, does anyone know how many variations there have been of the planet in Earth orbit but on the far side of the Sun? Ones that spring to mind include:

Journey to the Far Side of the Sun - Gerry Anderson film, with pleasingly realistic space hardware (for a 60s movie) and some massive logical holes that don't matter too much.

John Norman's Gor books - of limited interest to those of a feminist persuasion. I only know one person who's actually read any, and he found them offensive when he was 17.

Beyond the Sun - an unused, very early Doctor Who story. In an effort to get the school teachers back to Earth, the Doctor landed the TARDIS on the other planet. Apparently birds flew backwards there, and women were in charge - take that, Mr Norman! The world leader, by an odd coincidence, happened to look exactly like the TARDIS traveller Barbara.

I vaguely remember hearing about an asteroid located on the far side of the sun. Can't remember if that was fact or fiction though.

KaiYeves
2009-Nov-17, 10:20 PM
It's a big concept in comic books. Marvel has featured at least three "Counter-Earths".

Arnold Layne
2009-Nov-19, 03:07 PM
Arnold Layne

Paul Beardsley
2009-Nov-19, 04:13 PM
It's a big concept in comic books. Marvel has featured at least three "Counter-Earths".

Are they (relatively) realistic stories, or are they about superheroes?

Gandalf223
2009-Nov-19, 06:51 PM
If you discovered a planet, what would you name it?

Vogsphere, of course. It brings out the poet in me.

coreybv
2009-Nov-19, 07:04 PM
Vogsphere, of course. It brings out the poet in me.



Hmm... I was 100% sold on Nibiru, but now I'm torn.

Guess I'll have to discover two planets!

KaiYeves
2009-Nov-20, 12:57 AM
Are they (relatively) realistic stories, or are they about superheroes?
They were all (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counter-Earth_(comics))within the main 616 superhero universe, and they had quite a habit of getting destroyed.

Unwarranted solar system abuse, really.

bebe7
2009-Nov-20, 01:04 AM
If I discoverd one I think I sould name it Niburu just for fun. :p

I think I would like to know about the planet before choosing a name otherwise it maybe irrelavant IMHO.

:)