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coreybv
2009-Nov-15, 07:39 PM
So... Does anyone know of a good site that explains why dogs do some of the strange things they do? When I google "dog behavior" all I get are results about problem behavior. I'm not interested in that so much as just "why on earth do they do that"?

Specifically, what got me wondering about it today was, now that it's starting to get cold outside, why do they have to spend SO DARN LONG sniffing around for just the right place to do their business? I'm sure it's something to do with territory marking, but they've been using this same yard for years. I'm not sure just how much better marked it can get.

Not so much problem behavior that needs to be corrected, but when it's 15 degrees and I'm standing outside in shorts and slippers at 5:30 am, I sure do wish they'd dispense with all the ritual and ceremony and just pick a darn spot!

:)

slang
2009-Nov-15, 09:00 PM
Clearly the problem in this dog's behavior is that he has not properly trained you. They're not supposed to reward you with wagging tail and frantically jumping up and down before you've put on shoes, pants and a coat, hold the leash and say "doggie wanna go? doggie wanna go out?". Obviously this dog has displayed the reward behavior prematurely, thereby ruining your training. No wonder the situation becomes confused.

coreybv
2009-Nov-15, 09:09 PM
Are there classes they can go to and learn better methods for training their humans?


hold the leash and say "doggie wanna go? doggie wanna go out?".

Clearly you've never spent any time around my house. The actual scenario is more like: "Out? Now? Seriously? Do you guys have ANY idea what time it is? Ouch! What was that? Where's my darn shoes? Settle down, I'm coming. Can't you let me have a cup of coffee first? Just this once? Fine, I'll take it out with me. Ouch! Who put that chair there? Hold on, I said I was coming. No, sit down, you're next. Ok, fine, then I guess you have to go sit down. OK, here we go. NO! Leave the squirrel alone! I thought you had to go. Sheesh... Ouch! Oh great, you made me spill my coffee. You done yet? Yes, I see the stupid squirrel. Thanks for pointing it out, but we have dog food in the house, that'll have to do. Can we go in yet? It's cold and I need more coffee. Seriously? You're not done yet? Then knock off the sniffing and get on with it! Seriously, any spot is fine. Right where your standing looks great. Finally. Ok, let's go inside. I said inside. What's so interesting? Oh, cat poop. Yeah, make sure you sniff that real good. Great idea. Now go inside."

:) (In case it's not apparent, I'm not really a morning person...)

jrkeller
2009-Nov-15, 09:30 PM
When its warmer, materials be come vapor more easily. In other words, hot days equals a greater amount of released vapor.

Stregone
2009-Nov-15, 09:39 PM
Some dogs are picky about where they poop. A friends dog will not poop on snow. She has to clear out a small spot for him to go on.

coreybv
2009-Nov-15, 09:48 PM
When its warmer, materials be come vapor more easily. In other words, hot days equals a greater amount of released vapor.

Right, of course. Doesn't seem to change their routine, though. It's just that the human involved gets much more impatient about it when he's freezing his butt off. :lol:

slang
2009-Nov-15, 10:11 PM
Are there classes they can go to and learn better methods for training their humans?

I don't know, mine never told me about it. It may be a trade secret.


In case it's not apparent, I'm not really a morning person...

It was very apparent, to another non-morning person :)

mugaliens
2009-Nov-15, 10:28 PM
Specifically, what got me wondering about it today was, now that it's starting to get cold outside, why do they have to spend SO DARN LONG sniffing around for just the right place to do their business? I'm sure it's something to do with territory marking, but they've been using this same yard for years. I'm not sure just how much better marked it can get.

That's true - we don't exactly go sniffing around for the toilet, do we? :lol:

We do our business by both memory and deduction. Dogs do their business mostly by smell. Hopefully, they do remember well enough not to go in the house!

Salty
2009-Nov-16, 01:32 AM
That's one reason why I have one house dog and two yard dogs.

Lianachan
2009-Nov-16, 01:58 AM
Some dogs are picky about where they poop. A friends dog will not poop on snow. She has to clear out a small spot for him to go on.

I'm pretty sure you'd not be too keen on squatting on the cold snow yourself!

Jens
2009-Nov-16, 02:56 AM
I'm guessing that they spend the time because they're actually trying to find out if other dogs have invaded their territory. So it may not be so much choosing a spot but checking around before choosing a spot. But that's just a guess.

Just as a suggestion, if you want to get more scientific sites, you could probably try the query with some dog relative like wolf or jackal or coyote, and then extrapolate, because those other species probably behave similarly.

coreybv
2009-Nov-16, 02:56 AM
I'm pretty sure you'd not be too keen on squatting on the cold snow yourself!

Actually, my 3 don't mind it a bit. Then again, they're Siberian Huskies, they' were bred to thrive in cold and snow.

That's also why I take them out one at a time. They're freakishly strong pullers for their size. All three of them together could go anywhere they decided and there wouldn't be a thing I could do about it. They probably wouldn't even notice my weight dragging along behind them.

coreybv
2009-Nov-16, 02:57 AM
Just as a suggestion, if you want to get more scientific sites, you could probably try the query with some dog relative like wolf or jackal or coyote, and then extrapolate, because those other species probably behave similarly.

Excellent idea. I'll definitely give that a shot.

Ronald Brak
2009-Nov-16, 03:48 AM
Sometimes people and dogs run into trouble because of the different way they interpret things. For example, if you try to get your dog to stop jumping on the couch when you sit or lie down it might seem like a simple rule, but packs of dogs will lie and sleep together and the dog can interpret this as being rejected from the pack. A dog's solution to this is to jump on the couch and grovel and display submissive gestures until it is let back in into the pack, and it can be quite capable of doing this again and again and again until it feels secure again. The human thinks, "Crikey Flash Jack from Bendigo! How many times to I have to tell you not to jump up on the couch! What's wrong with you?" While the dog things, "Gymnastic gout-ridden goannas! How many times to I have to display that I'm submissive! What's wrong with you?"