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View Full Version : "The Day Before Tomorrow"....anyone else creeped-out by the weird weather?



banquo's_bumble_puppy
2009-Nov-23, 06:32 PM
Anyone else creeped-out by the weird weather? Are these erratic patterns become more frequent? Even though it was a somewhat (putting it mildly) crappy movie....does "The Day After Tomorrow" scenario seem somewhat likely? Will it be new ice-age or runaway greenhouse, ala Venus?

Swift
2009-Nov-23, 06:39 PM
What weird weather? The weather in Ohio hasn't been weird, other than slightly warmer than normal (though that's supposed to change by the end of the week). BBP, I think you are easily alarmed and are confusing normal variations in weather to something significant.

Paul Beardsley
2009-Nov-23, 06:43 PM
I think this is yet another occasion when posters should put meaningful information in their Location field. My first reaction to any post like the OP is to see where it is supposed to be taking place - and I see that BBP lives in Alpha III. It's not helpful!

jokergirl
2009-Nov-23, 06:46 PM
Weather's perfectly normal for November here. Wish it wasn't...!

;)

peteshimmon
2009-Nov-23, 06:46 PM
Heavy rain in the north of England has swept
away stone bridges that have served for
hundreds of years. No doubt thoughts about
replacements will tend to strong single span
jobs that will not be as much at risk from
future bad weather. And previous years here
have had bad flooding events.

Is it extra energy in the atmosphere? More
moisture from the Atlantic?

Whatever..infrastructure work must try to
minimise future risk!

Argos
2009-Nov-23, 06:46 PM
Nothing abnormal in my location. I think late spring is hotter than it should be, but feeling so is also normal to me.

gzhpcu
2009-Nov-23, 06:48 PM
My grandmother used to tell me how around 1920 the weather was very clement and mild with no snow at all here in Southern Switzerland. We are experiencing the same type of weather here now, after a couple of years where we had some heavy snow and cold weather.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Nov-23, 06:51 PM
In Denmark we look set to have the first November without night frost any place in the country since records were started in 1873.

Argos
2009-Nov-23, 06:51 PM
Is it extra energy in the atmosphere? More
moisture from the Atlantic?

My personal hypothesis for the recent events in England is that the heat content of the Gulf Stream is higher than normal, due to the poor hurricane season in the Caribbean [it is known that an active hurricane season cools the Caribbean waters down].

swampyankee
2009-Nov-23, 07:37 PM
I live in New England; if the weather weren't weird it wouldn't be any fun ;)

Since I've no idea where "Alpha III" is located, I can't tell how weird your weather has been. Mine has been its normally aggravating self. I expect ice storms as soon I have a job and have to return to my insanely long commutes.

novaderrik
2009-Nov-23, 07:52 PM
i live in Minnesota, where the weather can change dramatically on an hourly basis.
i've seen 55 degrees and rain in January only a few days after a spell of snow and -10 degree temps, and i've seen frost warnings in July with 100 degrees and thunderstorms a couple of days later.
it's really hard for me to get worked up over weird weather.

swampyankee
2009-Nov-23, 09:29 PM
i live in Minnesota, where the weather can change dramatically on an hourly basis.
i've seen 55 degrees and rain in January only a few days after a spell of snow and -10 degree temps, and i've seen frost warnings in July with 100 degrees and thunderstorms a couple of days later.
it's really hard for me to get worked up over weird weather.

When I went to college in Chicago (at IIT, not UC, but I digress...) I remember when the temperature went from 60F (288K) to -25F (241K) between Tuesday evening and Thursday morning. The weather away from the US coasts is routinely, and perversely, variable.

NorthernBoy
2009-Nov-24, 12:00 PM
I was up in North England this last weekend, where the rainfall was described as being at the "once in a thousand years" level. This can fairly be described as extreme (taking out major bridges and flooding towns), but probably not as "weird". The rain was still in the form of water, not acid or frogs, and Cumbria is already the wettest place in England, so it being a bit wetter while newsworthy, does not seem to warrant any special consideration.

Lianachan
2009-Nov-24, 12:24 PM
Some friends of mine were down in North England this last weekend, specifically in Cumbria and in the areas worst affected by the flooding. They've got some nice photos.

I don't think the weather here has been unusual in the slightest. It's a good chunk of the way through November, so up here in the extreme north of the UK it's dark most of the time, it's quite damp and quite chilly. Same as every November that I can remember.

banquo's_bumble_puppy
2009-Nov-24, 12:31 PM
I guess I was referring specifically to the rains in England.....the fires in Australia....

Alpha III is close to or in Nova Scotia.....not sure I don't get out much....

Seriously though....can the weather be called "normal"? Guess it's all relative....or so my relatives tell me ;-)

Lianachan
2009-Nov-24, 12:40 PM
I don't know how specific the news you get at Alpha III is, but it wasn't only England that was affected by flooding. Other parts of the UK also suffered.

I think there's more rain forecast for Cumbria in the coming days.

distraction tactics
2009-Nov-24, 02:01 PM
The weather here has been abnormally warm throughout November. I haven't worn a jacket yet, though I remember trick-or-treating as a kid with a foot of snow on the ground.

Then again, summer was abnormally cool. Weather is as weather does.

korjik
2009-Nov-24, 06:59 PM
Weather in Houston has been a bit cool and wet, which is abnormal unless there is an El Nino.

As a slight mod of what Paul said, at least put your location (or the appropriate locations) in the message if you are not willing to put it in the location header.

MAPNUT
2009-Nov-25, 01:22 PM
The weather away from the US coasts is routinely, and perversely, variable.

Are you supposing that the weather on the coasts is consistent?

When we talk about a thousand-year storm, we have calculated probabilities averaged over a region. The occurrence of a thousand-year storm doesn't mean any drastic change has occurred; it just means one location got an extreme storm. How big an area actually experienced the thousand-year storm in Cumbria? One county? One watershed? Where I live a 100-year storm would be 8 inches (20 cm) of rain in 24 hours. Other locations within a hundred miles of here have had 15-inch storms; some have never had 8 inches. So all kinds of weird weather can happen within the expected probabilities.

However, there is movement in hydrologic circles toward re-calculating precipitation probabilities used in design, to account for observed climate change. I believe this is because unusual numbers of extreme events have occurred in the past few years.

swampyankee
2009-Nov-25, 01:48 PM
Are you supposing that the weather on the coasts is consistent?

Well, you could try mapping my location. It's just that the temperature change in many parts of the US Midwest (I'm not familiar with comparable locations in any of the other countries) can be incredibly drastic. iirc, the record is something like 100F in less than 12 hours. I don't think this is particularly common on the coasts, due to the heat capacity of the nearby ocean.

rommel543
2009-Nov-25, 06:09 PM
In Manitoba it's already maintaining temperatures below freezing but with no snow. Normally we have a good layer of snow built up by now, this year nothing. Although I do remember about 12 years ago we had a similar situation. My ex-father in law went golfing on Christmas eve because there was no snow on the golf course near his house (the course wasn't open, he just played 9 holes to say that he did it).

The only thing that I can say to the 'weird weather' that the OP mentions is that the weather on the planet it variable. We've only been globally recording temperatures and weather patterns for about a hundred years. We can't hope to understand everything that is going on yet.

Lianachan
2009-Nov-26, 01:30 PM
The only thing that I can say to the 'weird weather' that the OP mentions is that the weather on the planet it variable. We've only been globally recording temperatures and weather patterns for about a hundred years. We can't hope to understand everything that is going on yet.

Absolutely. We can, though, tell quite a lot about global weather conditions from periods far earlier than that, via various techniques (dendrochronology and ice cores spring to mind).

coreybv
2009-Nov-26, 02:17 PM
It's just that the temperature change in many parts of the US Midwest (I'm not familiar with comparable locations in any of the other countries) can be incredibly drastic. iirc, the record is something like 100F in less than 12 hours.

Sounds within the realm of possibility.

While I've never experienced a change quite that dramatic, I vividly remember shoveling knee deep snow (from the previous night) on an 80 degree afternoon. Bit of an odd scene, driving around town seeing people pushing their snow blowers dressed in shorts and t-shirts. :lol: (I'm not sure how cold it got the previous night, but that was probably in the neighborhood of a 60 degree temperature swing.)

rommel543
2009-Nov-26, 03:50 PM
Absolutely. We can, though, tell quite a lot about global weather conditions from periods far earlier than that, via various techniques (dendrochronology and ice cores spring to mind).

Yes we can tell the atmospheric weather conditions they way the were at the location the samples were taken, along with atmospheric particle densities, etc. But that doesn't tell us that there was more snow than normal in the mid-west US, if it was colder than normal in India, or if the UK had a nice balmy summer.

Lianachan
2009-Nov-26, 03:58 PM
Yes we can tell the atmospheric weather conditions they way the were at the location the samples were taken, along with atmospheric particle densities, etc. But that doesn't tell us that there was more snow than normal in the mid-west US, if it was colder than normal in India, or if the UK had a nice balmy summer.

Localised dendrochronology can do that to a certain degree. You can tell how wet, warm, etc, a season or year was for that place, and compare with other locations. You can use it, to adopt your example, to see what parts of the UK had a balmy summer for any given years which dendro data exists for.

HenrikOlsen
2009-Nov-26, 04:43 PM
The localized weather data in dendrochronology is also used the other way, to identify where a wood sample grew, which was how one of the Roskilde viking ships was identified as being built by wood that grew in Ireland.

Lianachan
2009-Nov-26, 04:56 PM
The localized weather data in dendrochronology is also used the other way, to identify where a wood sample grew, which was how one of the Roskilde viking ships was identified as being built by wood that grew in Ireland.

Indeed. Being of an archaeological bent myself, that's the way I'm more used to thinking of it.