PDA

View Full Version : Something about a galactic alignment



Glom
2004-Feb-19, 04:42 PM
Any doomsaying yet?

Here is it (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3499359.stm)

ObiWan377
2004-Feb-19, 07:53 PM
No, but thats still cool though.

Drakheim
2004-Feb-19, 10:19 PM
Give it some time.. someone will eventually think of some odd way that galaxies millons or billions of lightyears away that are lined up will kill us. :P

Humphrey
2004-Feb-19, 10:22 PM
Itsd the deviding line between the universe...

"Take one step over this line and its war!"

That or a "X" for a giant game of tic-tac-toe

Normandy6644
2004-Feb-20, 01:24 AM
"Take one step over this line and its war!"

"Mom, the Virgo cluster is on my side!!"
"She started it!"

ocasey3
2004-Feb-20, 03:08 PM
My first thought is how incredible our night skies might be if the Milky Way was a part of a galaxy chain like that. Secondly, I wonder if it would have affected how life was generated on Earth. Or if life would even be possible. I know the distances are still quite great, but I wonder none the less.

Diamond
2004-Feb-20, 04:12 PM
The fact that all the galaxies appear to be reddened suggested that that line is an awful long way away. :o

russ_watters
2004-Feb-20, 05:19 PM
Give it some time.. someone will eventually think of some odd way that galaxies millons or billions of lightyears away that are lined up will kill us. :P ...that appear to be lined up. Since they are millions or billions of light years away, where they are in the sky now isn't where we see them.

Drakheim
2004-Feb-20, 05:59 PM
Give it some time.. someone will eventually think of some odd way that galaxies millons or billions of lightyears away that are lined up will kill us. :P ...that appear to be lined up. Since they are millions or billions of light years away, where they are in the sky now isn't where we see them.

True, but do you think the HBs will believe that? :wink:

TheGalaxyTrio
2004-Feb-20, 06:02 PM
Astronomers think the cosmic alignment has something to do with the way the cluster of galaxies is being assembled.

Geez! What would this be? A type XXXVII Civilization? :o

Edymnion
2004-Feb-20, 06:58 PM
Well, if the universe was created by a big bang, and space/time as we know it is expanding out in a spherical pattern, wouldn't it make sense for there to be a "shockwave" edge to the universe? You know, where you may have a few stars in front of the wave, most of the material in the universe in the wave itself, and then a more or less uniform distribution of stars behind the wave where they got left behind? Where the majority of the universe is still being blown out by the initial explosion?

TheGalaxyTrio
2004-Feb-20, 07:52 PM
Well, if the universe was created by a big bang, and space/time as we know it is expanding out in a spherical pattern, wouldn't it make sense for there to be a "shockwave" edge to the universe?

No, because before the Big Bang there was no space into which to expand. Spacetime itself was created along with matter, so, technically, the Big Bang happened simultaneously at all points in the universe. This is why we see more of a (relatively) uniform situation instead of a spherical shell.

I've read some theories that the universe is closed and curved in on itself, but I think the recent WMAP measurements pointed to a flat universe which was predicted by inflationary theory.

Kaptain K
2004-Feb-20, 07:54 PM
There is no edge, just as there is no center. As an analogy, think of the surface of the Earth. It has no center (on the surface) and no edge (no matter how far you go, you can't fall off).

Drakheim
2004-Feb-20, 07:56 PM
Sooooooo... if one were to ( in theory of course ) fly in what appears to them to be a stright line away from earth, would they eventually come back to it?

Maksutov
2004-Feb-21, 05:28 AM
Astronomers think the cosmic alignment has something to do with the way the cluster of galaxies is being assembled.

Geez! What would this be? A type XXXVII Civilization? :o

Come to think of it, close examinatino of the photo seems to reveal some sort of super large bowl right there in the middle of the field. This will probably kick off a new astronomical era. Too bad this wasn't first discovered by a New England observatory! :wink:

Maksutov
2004-Feb-21, 05:40 AM
Any doomsaying yet?

Here is it (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3499359.stm)

I downloaded the high definition image and scanned it using a high-pass Wratten yellow filter. I was really surprised, when looking at the cluster near the center, to find this particular pattern (inside the ellipse):

http://www.subaru.kh.ua/images/logo.gif

Really wouldn't be surprised if it were some sort of artifact of the telescope's optics. 8)

eburacum45
2004-Feb-21, 09:41 AM
Cosmic string.
Definitely.

Tobin Dax
2004-Feb-21, 09:22 PM
So, Muskatov, are you saying that someone just took a deep scan of the Pleiades? 8)

Kaptain K
2004-Feb-22, 03:31 AM
:-s Muskatov???? :o

Tobin Dax
2004-Feb-22, 07:36 AM
Whoops, I meant "Maksutov." Um, at least I didn't say "nebularian." :) 8-[ :oops:

Maksutov
2004-Feb-22, 07:58 AM
Hey, even "Mazeltov!" is fine by me if you're buying!

Maksutov
2004-Feb-22, 08:01 AM
:-s Muskatov???? :o

Sure.

"Now, boys, it'll be a few days before we attack the British at Fort Ticonderoga, and if what my nose is telling me is true, we're due for some rain. So keep your powder dry. If your powder gets wet, you won't be able to fire your Muskatov!"

Kaptain K
2004-Feb-22, 11:56 AM
... but don't call me late for dinner! [-X 8)

TheGalaxyTrio
2004-Feb-23, 03:54 PM
There is no edge, just as there is no center. As an analogy, think of the surface of the Earth. It has no center (on the surface) and no edge (no matter how far you go, you can't fall off).

Does this still hold in a flat universe (as it appears we may have on our hands)? My understanding is that you can't fall off the edge (or, more precisely, pass beyond the current extent of the post Bang expansion) because you cannot travel fast enough to reach it. The "end" is the limit of spacetime itself. In fact, you can't even travel fast enough to move closer to it because it's receding faster than you can travel (and, apparently, accelerating).

But given all that, there should be some shape or limiting extent to spacetime, and you can, in theory, define some sort of "edge". Even if you go to the old balloon analogy, the 2D critters on the surface of the balloon can't see an edge, but from our vantage point the balloon is finite and limited. It has a shape.

Sometimes I hate cosmology and, by extension I suppose, the Universe. :(

TheGalaxyTrio
2004-Feb-23, 03:56 PM
Sooooooo... if one were to ( in theory of course ) fly in what appears to them to be a stright line away from earth, would they eventually come back to it?

I don't think this would work even in a closed universe destined to recollapse. It would recollapse before you "circled" back, even if you somehow started your trip shortly after the Big Bang.

russ_watters
2004-Feb-23, 06:02 PM
Sooooooo... if one were to ( in theory of course ) fly in what appears to them to be a stright line away from earth, would they eventually come back to it? Quite possibly, yes. But it depends on expansion (collapse) rate among other things