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View Full Version : What Will the "Naughty Aughties" Be Remembered For?



Tuckerfan
2009-Dec-26, 05:44 AM
Depending upon how you want to look at it, the first decade of the 21st Century is either closing at the end of this year, or entering its final year in a few days. Speaking as a 'Merkin, I can't think of a single event from the first decade of the 20th Century which springs to mind, but I'm more than fairly certain that 100 years from now, people will remember this decade for a number of reasons. 9/11 being the most obvious, of course, but there are others, I'm sure. (I won't list all the ones that I'm thinking of, simply because I don't want to monopolize the thread.) So what do you think people in 100 years will remember from this decade?

SkepticJ
2009-Dec-26, 06:32 AM
The movie District 9

The prevailing of ideology over scientific advancement in certain areas of biotech (i.e. embryonic stem cell research).

CERN--whatever it finds, or doesn't.

Damburger
2009-Dec-26, 09:51 AM
Exo-planets. We discovered the first rocky worlds outside our solar system this decade, and the first that could potentially harbour liquid water.

jokergirl
2009-Dec-26, 11:17 AM
The Boston Globe has a photographic summary of the 00s (http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/12/the_decade_in_news_photographs.html), and most, if not all of it, is sad.

I was having such great hopes for this decade. But it doesn't look like it was much good at all.

...oh yes, one thing. The return of Apple and the iPhone. And possibly Google.

;)

KaiYeves
2009-Dec-26, 03:41 PM
The Boston Globe has a photographic summary of the 00s, and most, if not all of it, is sad.
Tyler, Texas? I thought Columbia broke up over Palestine.

Kind of funny that in the first decade where people were in space 24/7, the only mentions of it are a disaster and a hurricane seen from orbit. Perhaps it was easy to forget, in light of all else that was happening.

The Backroad Astronomer
2009-Dec-26, 04:48 PM
Exo-planets. We discovered the first rocky worlds outside our solar system this decade, and the first that could potentially harbour liquid water.
The first exo-planets were dixcovered in the ninties.

Romanus
2009-Dec-26, 05:26 PM
It's hard to say, because so much of the past is defined more in terms of succession than in itself. For instance, the Belle Époque will forever be viewed in contrast to World War I, just as the Roaring Twenties will always be filtered through the lens of the Great Depression. In other words, I'm guessing it will take another decade to "fit" the '00s into the larger historical milieu.

Still, I can't help but give it a go. In a century, I think people will focus most on:

*The explosive growth of the developing world, with the U.S. retreating close to "first among equals" status by the end of the decade (which I think will be complete by the end of the following one).

*The economic volatility of the decade compared to the two preceding ones (not that they were any picnic).

*The flowering of what, unfortunately, looks to be a very long and bitter showdown between cultural conservatism and experimentation--and I'm not really referring to politics. Partly this is due to globalization, and partly due to grappling with technologies whose implications we're still not fully aware of.

Without going too far on a tangent, I think global civilization is going through a Reformation-like period of social and political adjustment; just as the last one was a confluence of technology, economics, politics, and religion, so will this one be. Like the Reformation, I also think it will take decades to sort out before some kind of equilibrium is reached.

Just my two bits.

Cougar
2009-Dec-26, 06:07 PM
...I can't think of a single event from the first decade of the 20th Century which springs to mind... So what do you think people in 100 years will remember from this decade?

Scientifically, I expect there were several important findings, but as you say, none really spring to my mind either without a little research. Astrophysically, things are rather overshadowed by the 1998 finding of the accelerating expansion, the 'mechanics' of which will apparently keep physicists busy for decades.

Otherwise, it will likely be remembered that U.S. voters elected the first African-American to the U.S. Presidency. (The first serious woman contender for the presidency narrowly lost her party's nomination to the first serious African-American contender, who went on to win the presidency and appoint her as Secretary of State.)

Swift
2009-Dec-26, 06:26 PM
Speaking as a 'Merkin, I can't think of a single event from the first decade of the 20th Century which springs to mind, but I'm more than fairly certain that 100 years from now, people will remember this decade for a number of reasons.
I guess it depends on what you mean by "remember". As you said, you can't think of a single event from the first decade of the 20th century (neither can I). I'm sure history books and historians will remember stuff from the 1900s as well as the 2000s. But 100 years from now, I suspect the average person on the street, particularly if they were not alive at this time, will remember pretty close to nothing. Americans might have vague hints about 9/11 ("was that 2002 or 2022?), I suspect people from Southeast Asia might have similar hints about the 2004 tsunami, but for the average kid on the street it will be well into the "is this going to be on the test" category.

Moose
2009-Dec-26, 09:09 PM
... Probably best forgotten...

SolusLupus
2009-Dec-26, 09:16 PM
The introduction of youtube and extremely popular online social networks.

Donnie B.
2009-Dec-26, 09:56 PM
... I can't think of a single event from the first decade of the 20th Century which springs to mind...
I guess those crazy Wright brothers didn't have much impact after all, then...

Chuck
2009-Dec-26, 10:04 PM
Pairs of zeros in the year number to decorate with eyebrows, noses, and smiles.

kleindoofy
2009-Dec-26, 10:12 PM
Decades aren't remembered for individual occurences. Those are remembered for themselves.

The moon landing is remembered as having taken place in 1969, but not as beining typical for the '60's. However, hippies, the civil rights movement, the sexual revolution, women's lib, the "generation gap," etc. come to mind as being "from the 60's."

Trends define a decade, not dates.

I think the 00's will be remembered for the coming of age of the internet, email spam, post cold-war economic globalization, homeland security, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

I think we may also be frowned upon for failing to take environmental issues seriously while there was still a chance. However, the blame for that might fall on the 10's.

Damburger
2009-Dec-26, 10:43 PM
The first exo-planets were dixcovered in the ninties.

Did you actually read what I wrote? The exo-planets in the nineties were almost all hot jupiters, and none were rocky worlds (aside from a few oddities orbiting pulsars that certainly couldn't harbour liquid water).

Check your own facts before you check anyone elses.

The Backroad Astronomer
2009-Dec-26, 11:20 PM
Did you actually read what I wrote? The exo-planets in the nineties were almost all hot jupiters, and none were rocky worlds (aside from a few oddities orbiting pulsars that certainly couldn't harbour liquid water).

Check your own facts before you check anyone elses.
If you said "rocky planets that could contain water" that would be more clear. The way you worded it comes off as they found rocky planets period for the first time and some of these might contain water.

SolusLupus
2009-Dec-26, 11:25 PM
Decades aren't remembered for individual occurences. Those are remembered for themselves.

The moon landing is remembered as having taken place in 1969, but not as beining typical for the '60's. However, hippies, the civil rights movement, the sexual revolution, women's lib, the "generation gap," etc. come to mind as being "from the 60's."

Trends define a decade, not dates.

I think the 00's will be remembered for the coming of age of the internet, email spam, post cold-war economic globalization, homeland security, Iraq, and Afghanistan.

I think we may also be frowned upon for failing to take environmental issues seriously while there was still a chance. However, the blame for that might fall on the 10's.
I agree with this post 100%.

That is all.

John Jaksich
2009-Dec-27, 12:51 AM
I agree with this post 100%.

That is all.

I seond that response!

Well put kleindoofy!

Xelebes
2009-Dec-27, 04:11 AM
Emo
Electroclash / 80's Revival
Tektonic (French phenomenon)
Jumpstyle (Belgian-Dutch phenomenon)
Guido/Gino (American-Canadian phenomenon)
Rise of Muslim Terrorism
Search for Exoplanets (first found in 90's but it wasn't until this decade when it became a common headline to read that another planet had been found.)
Tanning-bed addiction
(Crystal) Meth addiction

traceur
2009-Dec-27, 09:41 AM
doesn't that depend on how the next decades will contrast?
as a society we don't remember a decade by what started in it or even the dominant features in it, we remember it by what distinguished it.

so we first need to ask ourselves what of the stuff that started this decade is not going to continue...

clop
2009-Dec-27, 11:22 AM
Depending upon how you want to look at it, the first decade of the 21st Century is either closing at the end of this year, or entering its final year in a few days. Speaking as a 'Merkin, I can't think of a single event from the first decade of the 20th Century which springs to mind, but I'm more than fairly certain that 100 years from now, people will remember this decade for a number of reasons. 9/11 being the most obvious, of course, but there are others, I'm sure. (I won't list all the ones that I'm thinking of, simply because I don't want to monopolize the thread.) So what do you think people in 100 years will remember from this decade?

You know that a merkin is a pubic wig designed to hide the effects of syphilis?

Damburger
2009-Dec-27, 07:02 PM
Yes I should've been more clear; there were a couple of near-earth sized planets discovered in the 90s, but they were orbiting pulsars and thus were certainly dead, likely radiation soaked, rocks.

Exo-planets entered the public consciousness this decade, because the planets are far more relevant both to scientists and the general public. I was working in an office when the news broke about the super-Earths in the Gliese 581 system, and people at work who had no interest in science generally were very interested and knew quite a bit about these new planets.

However much I would like it not to be, this decade will be remembered above all for 9/11 not because it was the most significant event (debatable) but because it was the most replayed, talked about and referenced event. The video images of it were replayed constantly for months by news producers who treated them like they were clips from a Jerry Bruckheimer movie and not real life footage of peoples loved ones being murdered. Every talking head on TV used it as a reference point for their arguments ("9/11 changed everything" etc.).

Personally I think that the rise of mass mobile communication, web 2.0 and social networking technology is more historically relevant (maybe I will be vindicated in this belief; the 1900s are now more generally remembered for powered flight and not for the assassination of President McKinley). The rise of wikipedia and its prevalence, for better or worse, against expert sources; the use of phone cameras in Burma and twitter in Iran to provide a medium for dissident groups; and the increase in big media in the west soliciting and responding to the opinions of viewers.

KaiYeves
2009-Dec-27, 08:41 PM
I guess those crazy Wright brothers didn't have much impact after all, then...
Well said.

Glom
2009-Dec-27, 11:49 PM
Speaking as a 'Merkin, I can't think of a single event from the first decade of the 20th Century which springs to mind,

You come to a science and technology board and say you cannot think of anything significant from the 1900s?

Einstein's Annus Mirabilis? Rutherford's alpha scattering experiment that led to the discovery of the nucleus? The first flight of the Wright Brothers?

Have him taken away and fed his own socks until deemed fit to re-enter BAUT society.

Tuckerfan
2009-Dec-28, 06:46 AM
You know that a merkin is a pubic wig designed to hide the effects of syphilis?

Ayup. That's why its so funny to refer to us folks from the US by that term. :D

Tuckerfan
2009-Dec-28, 06:54 AM
You come to a science and technology board and say you cannot think of anything significant from the 1900s?

Einstein's Annus Mirabilis? Rutherford's alpha scattering experiment that led to the discovery of the nucleus? The first flight of the Wright Brothers?

Have him taken away and fed his own socks until deemed fit to re-enter BAUT society.

None of those things "defined" the time period from 1900 - 1909 like how, for example, the Roaring 20s defined the period shortly after, or the Great Depression defined the 30s, WWII defined the 40s, etc.

You're talking about remarkable achievements, but we don't think of them in conjunction with the era in which they occurred. Just like I don't think that in 100 years people will hear mention of this decade and think, "Oh! That was the decade when for only the second time in its history, humanity completely eradicated a disease!" (http://ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=49826)

SkepticJ
2009-Dec-28, 08:06 AM
None of those things "defined" the time period from 1900 - 1909 like how, for example, the Roaring 20s defined the period shortly after, or the Great Depression defined the 30s, WWII defined the 40s, etc.

Dot-Com Bubble popping.

The Great Recession (or whatever it is that we've been in the last year and whatever)

The Backroad Astronomer
2009-Dec-28, 08:18 AM
For me the decade started bad and ending bad. I just want to get it over.

SolusLupus
2009-Dec-28, 08:20 AM
Everyone always thinks they're living in The Bad Times. :p

Glom
2009-Dec-28, 12:21 PM
None of those things "defined" the time period from 1900 - 1909 like how, for example, the Roaring 20s defined the period shortly after, or the Great Depression defined the 30s, WWII defined the 40s, etc.

You're talking about cultural thing? Well this decade will be defined by Harry Potter probably.

KaiYeves
2009-Dec-29, 06:57 PM
Everyone always thinks they're living in The Bad Times.
True. The Scholastic News 2003 Year in Review probably gave me some advice I have never forgotten (It helps that I saved the magazine):


Life is always a mix of good and bad news... It's important to keep up on all sorts of stories. That way, things don't look impossibly gloomy or too good to be true.

Good advice, and not just for kids in grade school.