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BigDon
2010-Jan-07, 06:13 PM
Enough to squeeze the adrenals...

Powering down, let you guys know how this turns out later.

01101001
2010-Jan-07, 06:17 PM
USGS (http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Quakes/nc71336726.htm)

Magnitude 4.2 - local magnitude (ML)
Time Thursday, January 7, 2010 at 10:09:35 AM (PST)
Thursday, January 7, 2010 at 18:09:35 (UTC)
Distance from Milpitas, CA - 10 km (6 miles) ENE (62 degrees)
Alum Rock, CA - 12 km (8 miles) NNE (12 degrees)
Sunol, CA - 16 km (10 miles) SSE (150 degrees)
San Jose City Hall, CA - 17 km (11 miles) NNE (29 degrees)

BigDon
2010-Jan-07, 06:58 PM
Considering you were 40 miles closer you must have felt that one, o binary one.

Gillianren
2010-Jan-07, 08:24 PM
4.2? That's nothing! I don't even get out of bed for a 4.2. (Of course, Dr. Kate always said it was best, if you were in bed during an earthquake, to stay there.) Though of course people up here go nuts over it.

01101001
2010-Jan-07, 08:37 PM
4.2? That's nothing! I don't even get out of bed for a 4.2.

It was small, but the best I felt in a few years. It was like one good kick to my office chair, a several-inch wiggle. No, it wouldn't have gotten me out of bed either. It was just a bit of fun in an otherwise dull morning.

It appeared to be greatly exciting for some visitors from more-stationary Washington DC and London.

Gillianren
2010-Jan-07, 08:58 PM
Heh. I horrify some of my friends not from California when I say that I was babysitting once, and I waited for the commercial break in my TV show before going upstairs to check on the kids. I figured they'd call me if there were a problem, and it obviously wasn't serious enough to interrupt Next Gen. The earthquake it was a foreshock for (Landers?), I would have gone up to check on them a lot sooner!

korjik
2010-Jan-07, 09:07 PM
I have always thought it is odd to see the differences in worries. A 4.2 here would cause a pretty good fright, but a cat 2 hurricane is almost a yawner. Heck, the freeze we are getting is more of a worry for alot of people.

Gillianren
2010-Jan-07, 10:48 PM
It's what you're used to and what you learn about. I talked to one of the dorm maintenance people shortly after the Nisqually quake up here (she was wet-vaccing vanilla extract out of my carpet; a large and full bottle had fallen and broken), and she's from Ohio, I think. Tornadoes, she knew about from school. She could handle tornadoes. They'd never taught her what to do in case of earthquake.

Frankly, I found the response to the earthquake from the school a little alarming. The first place they herded everyone onto has steam tunnels running under it. I think the safest place was the third try; it's also quite a way from main campus, so in a more damaging earthquake, that could have been a serious problem. I know that the dorm's worst-case scenario isn't bad enough--no worry about pancaking building or snow or even freezing rain. I know that there is considered to be no way of tracking who is or isn't out of the dorms. And that maintenance girl I talked to? Went into my building, with three other people going into the other big three concrete monoliths, and pulled the fire alarm so people would evacuate.

Lianachan
2010-Jan-07, 11:04 PM
and London.We Highlanders are more used to such things. I live on a fault. Earthquakes are mild, but pretty common.

BigDon
2010-Jan-08, 01:41 AM
We Highlanders are more used to such things. I live on a fault. Earthquakes are mild, but pretty common.

Gillian, I get scared because on two different occassion I rode out a pair of 4's twenty minutes apart and then rocked out at 7+'s.

So a 4 gets me nervous for a few minutes. Mak used to talk to me when these would happen at night. As I have a particular dread of being pinned in rubble and burned alive. It happened to people during our last two major quakes. :cry:

Local news carried a story of a S.F. police officer aquitted of shooting two people pinned. He had been with them for several hours, then the flames came. And they pleaded with him to shoot them.

That's the local urban legend at least.

I'm not ashamed to be afraid of earthquakes.

BigDon
2010-Jan-08, 02:00 AM
I live on an active fault on top of a huge deposit of natural talc. Some are saying "white cliffs of Dover" sized only a mile or two down.

Woo hoo.

I least I don't have liquifraction issues.

Unless I'm standing somewhere that does. At least at home I don't. But I'm standing in the ding weeds half the time as I no longer have legitimate employment.

If I make it 'til spring I'm going to ask for a packing job at a moving place I know. (AMS Relocation in Burlingame. A Bekins outfit. I like working for them, if that's any endorsement.)

BigDon
2010-Jan-08, 02:30 AM
Oh Gillian! How are you doing by the way?

Were the holidays nice to you?

Gillianren
2010-Jan-08, 03:34 AM
Gillian, I get scared because on two different occassion I rode out a pair of 4's twenty minutes apart and then rocked out at 7+'s.

Well, yes, but I don't get scared at the bigger ones, either, by any real definition of the word. Jumpy, a bit, but not scared.


So a 4 gets me nervous for a few minutes. Mak used to talk to me when these would happen at night. As I have a particular dread of being pinned in rubble and burned alive. It happened to people during our last two major quakes. :cry:

Happens to people in a lot of major quakes, alas. (And I miss Mak, too.) Burning alive is my personal Worst Way to Die, at least that would reasonably happen to me.


Local news carried a story of a S.F. police officer aquitted of shooting two people pinned. He had been with them for several hours, then the flames came. And they pleaded with him to shoot them.

That's the local urban legend at least.

I'd want evidence of that. It seems very unlikely.


I'm not ashamed to be afraid of earthquakes.

That's fine. Everyone's scared of something.


I least I don't have liquifraction issues.

Psst--"liquefaction." We have huge issues with it up here. Downtown Olympia's built on mudflats.


Were the holidays nice to you?

Kind of dreadful, really. It was the second time I'd had an apartment flood around New Year's--this time, it was the night before New Year's Eve, whereas last time I think it was actually New Year's Eve. My washer overflowed. They'd just installed the thing; it's the third one we've had in here in the last six months. Of course, the two "new" ones were really used and just from other apartments. Mike the Maintenance Man test-ran this one twice. I ran a load and had a dry laundry room floor--the previous two leaked about a half-cup or so per load. On the second load I ran, it seems a hose came loose. Our floor should be dry tomorrow or the next day!

Jens
2010-Jan-08, 03:38 AM
4.2? That's nothing! I don't even get out of bed for a 4.2.

One thing that's missing from the Richter scale is that the magnitude doesn't really tell you much. Being at the epicenter of a shallow 4.2 magnitude quake can be much worse than being 100 miles away from a deep earthquake of higher magnitude. In Japan they don't use the Richter scale much. When an earthquake happens, they report the amount of shaking in different locations, and then there is usually a display on TV of the magnitude and the depth. And most people don't pay attention to the magnitude but rather the shaking scale.

Jens
2010-Jan-08, 03:44 AM
Went into my building, with three other people going into the other big three concrete monoliths, and pulled the fire alarm so people would evacuate.

Sometimes it's really tricky to know what to do. I know that here, they usually instruct kids at school to under their desks if there is a big earthquake. The reason is, evacuation can be safe but one of the big immediate dangers is falling glass, and you really don't want to have kids running out of doors when window panes are falling from above. So I think the most immediate thing is: get away from glass. In any case, you can't get out of a building fast enough to beat an earthquake, unless you jump out the window, I think.

Tobin Dax
2010-Jan-08, 06:50 AM
It's what you're used to and what you learn about. I talked to one of the dorm maintenance people shortly after the Nisqually quake up here (she was wet-vaccing vanilla extract out of my carpet; a large and full bottle had fallen and broken), and she's from Ohio, I think. Tornadoes, she knew about from school. She could handle tornadoes. They'd never taught her what to do in case of earthquake.
All these years east of the Mississippi, and tornadoes still bother me. Probably always will. I grew up in the Pacific Northwest, west of the Cascades. I can't handle anything. :lol:

Jens
2010-Jan-08, 07:16 AM
All these years east of the Mississippi, and tornadoes still bother me. Probably always will. I grew up in the Pacific Northwest, west of the Cascades. I can't handle anything. :lol:

I bet you can handle rain. :)

Gillianren
2010-Jan-08, 09:18 AM
Sometimes it's really tricky to know what to do. I know that here, they usually instruct kids at school to under their desks if there is a big earthquake. The reason is, evacuation can be safe but one of the big immediate dangers is falling glass, and you really don't want to have kids running out of doors when window panes are falling from above. So I think the most immediate thing is: get away from glass. In any case, you can't get out of a building fast enough to beat an earthquake, unless you jump out the window, I think.

The cement monoliths are at minimum five stories tall and made with thin walls and thick floors. You might not beat the earthquake out on the first one, but if they're just weakened in it, they could go at a second one. Besides, state buildings--they have to be evacuated and then inspected anyway.


All these years east of the Mississippi, and tornadoes still bother me. Probably always will. I grew up in the Pacific Northwest, west of the Cascades. I can't handle anything. :lol:

Ha--I've seen more extreme weather while living here in Olympia than I ever did back in California.

01101001
2010-Jan-08, 08:08 PM
USGS (http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Quakes/nc71337451.html)


Magnitude 3.8 - regional moment magnitude (Mw)
Time Friday, January 8, 2010 at 11:48:50 AM (PST)
Friday, January 8, 2010 at 19:48:50 (UTC)

Same location

It was so light, I wondered. Nobody else felt anything. 10 minutes later I happened to fire up a radio and people were calling in their reports.

LaurelHS
2010-Jan-08, 08:15 PM
Kind of dreadful, really. It was the second time I'd had an apartment flood around New Year's--this time, it was the night before New Year's Eve, whereas last time I think it was actually New Year's Eve. My washer overflowed. They'd just installed the thing; it's the third one we've had in here in the last six months. Of course, the two "new" ones were really used and just from other apartments. Mike the Maintenance Man test-ran this one twice. I ran a load and had a dry laundry room floor--the previous two leaked about a half-cup or so per load. On the second load I ran, it seems a hose came loose. Our floor should be dry tomorrow or the next day!

I sympathize, believe me. My former apartment got flooded once because of a plumbing issue that the landlord admitted should have been fixed months before. I lost a cute rug and some books.

rommel543
2010-Jan-08, 08:57 PM
Being in Winnipeg our biggest concern is the cold in the winter and the amount of mosquitoes we get in the summer. We do get tornado warnings in the summer but they are VERY rare to touch down. Our earthquake "Seismic Hazard" is 0. I think the closest historically that I've seen is a 5.5 in North Dakota in 1909. Here is a PDF map (http://earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/histor/images/caneqmap_e.pdf) of Earthquakes in Canada from 1627 to 2007. Nothing for us.

BigDon
2010-Jan-08, 10:25 PM
Gillian, as a compulsive fishkeeper I assure you I too dread walking into the livingroom and feeling that "squish, squish" on the carpet.

geonuc
2010-Jan-08, 10:46 PM
Being in Winnipeg our biggest concern is the cold in the winter and the amount of mosquitoes we get in the summer. We do get tornado warnings in the summer but they are VERY rare to touch down. Our earthquake "Seismic Hazard" is 0. I think the closest historically that I've seen is a 5.5 in North Dakota in 1909. Here is a PDF map (http://earthquakescanada.nrcan.gc.ca/histor/images/caneqmap_e.pdf) of Earthquakes in Canada from 1627 to 2007. Nothing for us.
You are on some old rock. Really old rock. Being set in its ways, it doesn't move. :)

Tobin Dax
2010-Jan-09, 12:20 AM
Ha--I've seen more extreme weather while living here in Olympia than I ever did back in California.
I did miss the really cold weather this year when I was visiting my parents. The day I left, the temperature went into the forties. It was a bit colder in Nashville, and I haven't seen temperatures above freezing since I got back here. :(

Tobin Dax
2010-Jan-09, 12:22 AM
I bet you can handle rain. :)
Rain really isn't on the natural disaster level. But yes, I have webbed feet, as the saying goes.

PetersCreek
2010-Jan-09, 01:24 AM
Being an 'expatriate' of the Deep South, I've seen my share of severe thunderstorms, flooding, hurricanes, tornadoes, and the like. So far, I find earthquakes up here to be less worrisome. The 5.6 I experienced on the 20th floor of my old office building was a bit fun, though.

Gillianren
2010-Jan-09, 02:27 AM
I sympathize, believe me. My former apartment got flooded once because of a plumbing issue that the landlord admitted should have been fixed months before. I lost a cute rug and some books.

I really don't blame the maintenance guy for this one--he did run the thing twice before installing it in an attempt to make sure it didn't leak. Fortunately, I only lost a half-dozen books, and although my 1937 copy of Of Mice and Men got slightly wet, it seems mostly okay. The cover's not in the best condition, but the book is still in one piece. And the pages still turn.

ABR.
2010-Jan-10, 12:42 AM
About 10 minutes ago, we felt a moderate earthquake here in the Sierra Nevada foothills. I filed a report on the USGS website (http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Quakes/nc71338066.htm). Now it is showing a 6.5 off the North Coast near Eureka. From memory, I didn't think the shaking here was nearly as strong as some I experienced in Arkansas such as one in 1976 which measured out at about 5-5.5 or so on the Richter Scale.

Any other Northern California or Oregon posters feel this one?

ETA: Just talked to a friend in Eureka. This quake definitely caught his attention and it sounds like some things fell off shelves, but no major damage to his place. The shake map on the USGS website is showing this one was felt pretty far and wide.

LaurelHS
2010-Jan-10, 01:47 AM
About 10 minutes ago, we felt a moderate earthquake here in the Sierra Nevada foothills. I filed a report on the USGS website (http://quake.wr.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Quakes/nc71338066.htm). Now it is showing a 6.5 off the North Coast near Eureka. From memory, I didn't think the shaking here was nearly as strong as some I experienced in Arkansas such as one in 1976 which measured out at about 5-5.5 or so on the Richter Scale.

Any other Northern California or Oregon posters feel this one?

ETA: Just talked to a friend in Eureka. This quake definitely caught his attention and it sounds like some things fell off shelves, but no major damage to his place. The shake map on the USGS website is showing this one was felt pretty far and wide.
CNN (http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/01/09/california.earthquake/index.html) reports that this earthquake caused some power outages, but no injuries have been reported so far.

hhEb09'1
2010-Jan-10, 01:51 AM
A little over an hour ago, huh? That's not a small one...here's CNN:

http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/01/09/california.earthquake/index.html


There were no immediate reports of injuries

ABR.
2010-Jan-10, 02:09 AM
A little over an hour ago, huh? That's not a small one...here's CNN:

No, it's not. For us here in the Sierra Nevadas, it wasn't a big deal at the time. The quake wasn't showing up on the USGS site when I filed the "did you feel it" report. After I finished, I was shocked to find out the magnitude and that the epicenter was so far away.

My friend in Eureka says that the VCR jumped off the TV, several potted plants fell and broke their pots and several other glass items fell and broke. Apparently, the stores are closed and there's a lot of traffic on the streets.

hhEb09'1
2010-Jan-10, 02:18 AM
Liar's Richter: I just felt a 7.0. Yeah, that's right...

Glad to hear everybody's OK.

NEOWatcher
2010-Jan-12, 05:47 PM
Of course, it was predicted by a dog...

(video)Dog predicts quake? (http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/bestoftv/2010/01/12/ac.dog.earthquake.shot.cnn)

Yes; just a case of the dog feeling it "moments" before the earthquake hits. Or should that just be, feeling the early movements of the quake which are undetectable by humans.

Of course, did that human in the video really jump up to see where the dog went, or did he have an early sense of it too? After all, he didn't run in the same direction as the dog. :think:

ABR.
2010-Feb-04, 08:46 PM
Another earthquake (http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Quakes/nc71348851.htm) off the coast of Northern California a few minutes ago. This one registered at about 6.0 and I felt it although I'm nearly 200 miles away.

NEOWatcher
2010-Feb-04, 09:17 PM
Another earthquake (http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/Quakes/nc71348851.htm) off the coast of Northern California a few minutes ago.
And now has hit the news.
6.0 Magnitude Quake Reported off Norcal Coast (http://www.ktla.com/news/landing/ktla-quake,0,3896359.story?hpt=T2)
It would have been nice of them to attach a map to show where it was rather than some stock photo of a seismograph.

ABR.
2010-Feb-04, 09:35 PM
My friend in Eureka has described this one as a slow roller and nothing like the big one last month.

NEOWatcher, if you go straight to this USGS webpage (http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/latest.htm), you'll get a better idea of where the quake was located.

NEOWatcher
2010-Feb-05, 01:56 PM
NEOWatcher, if you go straight to this USGS webpage (http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/latest.htm), you'll get a better idea of where the quake was located.
Absolutely; but my point was that the reporters are doing the least amount of work they can get away with. I have seen plenty of articles with maps to expect this. (and I did say "it would be nice", just to point out a simple courtesy rather than something lacking)

But; to be fair to the article, it was a local station, so thier regular audience probably has some idea. Unfortunately, it was picked up by the national media.

Cougar
2010-Feb-05, 05:12 PM
I was 30 miles away from the epicenter of the 1994 Northridge Quake. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1994_Northridge_earthquake)



The earthquake had a "strong" moment magnitude of 6.7, but the ground acceleration was one of the highest ever instrumentally recorded in an urban area in North America. Seventy-two deaths were attributed to the earthquake, with over 9,000 injured. In addition, the earthquake caused an estimated $20 billion in damage, making it one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history.

It was a big one, all right, even for SoCal. I just rode it out in bed. It was like two freight trains going right by my bedroom at about 70 mph in opposite directions. And loud. Dishes probably would have been thrown from the cupboard, but fortunately they were all dirty and in the sink. No problem! :whistle:

jj_0001
2010-Feb-06, 05:34 AM
Went into my building, with three other people going into the other big three concrete monoliths, and pulled the fire alarm so people would evacuate.

Even 'B' dorm? :o

Gillianren
2010-Feb-06, 07:41 AM
Even 'B' dorm? :o

It's where I lived at the time!

mugaliens
2010-Feb-06, 08:00 AM
I haven't been able to follow this thread in the last two weeks, but I'm very glad to see the C-130 units were among the first to respond with aid.

I sincerely hope they work out the money issues so that the people of Haiti receive the aid they so desperately need during this crisis.

HenrikOlsen
2010-Feb-06, 11:21 AM
... and she's from Ohio, I think. Tornadoes, she knew about from school. She could handle tornadoes. They'd never taught her what to do in case of earthquake.
<snip>
And that maintenance girl I talked to? Went into my building, with three other people going into the other big three concrete monoliths, and pulled the fire alarm so people would evacuate.
I forgot to comment on it at the time, but there are four people who in a quiet and likely almost entirely overlooked way counts as heroes in my book.

Gillianren
2010-Feb-06, 08:18 PM
I forgot to comment on it at the time, but there are four people who in a quiet and likely almost entirely overlooked way counts as heroes in my book.

And the one I was talking to was also working her way through school while supporting a young son. The more hero she, right?

BigDon
2010-Feb-06, 09:58 PM
So, are we getting lined up for our every twenty year big one? It would seem so to me. Fortunately the building I live in is a two story with I-beam construction that's rode out several doozies already.

Luckmeister
2010-Feb-07, 12:10 AM
In 1996, just before the Duvall quake southeast of Everett WA, where we were setting up for a band gig, I looked out the window and saw streetlights flicker about 5 blocks away. Then they flickered about 2 blocks away. I was just starting to think, "what the heck!" when the place began to shake. That's the only time I've seen a quake coming. Of course that sequence took less than a second since even the slower "S" wave travels at least 3 kps -- not enough time to figure out what was about to happen.

Mike

mugaliens
2010-Feb-07, 02:05 AM
Mike, that's interesting! You're probably one of the few who's ever witnessed the progressive movement of a quake!

Luckmeister
2010-Feb-10, 03:19 AM
Mike, that's interesting! You're probably one of the few who's ever witnessed the progressive movement of a quake!

Perhaps that's so. I told people there what I saw and commented that I wondered if the quake was centered in that direction. It turned out it was. I was looking out in the general direction of Duvall. It was a short but fairly strong shallow quake. Enough to get the adrenaline flowing. It's at a time like that when you think about all the things at home that are perched precariously at table height or higher.

Mike

ABR.
2010-Mar-11, 11:52 PM
We had a small earthquake here earlier, ~2.8 magnitude. The interesting part was that the epicenter was only a couple miles away and about 8 miles down.

korjik
2010-Mar-12, 04:35 AM
So, are we getting lined up for our every twenty year big one? It would seem so to me. Fortunately the building I live in is a two story with I-beam construction that's rode out several doozies already.

We had our 20-year big one September before last. Went by the name of Ike.

Oh, wait, you meant earthquakes......

I think I will keep my hurricanes, they are alot less sneaky.

:)

ABR.
2011-Oct-27, 06:57 AM
Small quake just woke me up. Looks like a 4.8 or thereabouts. Info here (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsus/Quakes/nc71671056.html). Something's wrong with the reporting feature on the USGS website, or maybe it's just my computer -- in any case, I wasn't able to access the Did you Feel It.

BigDon
2011-Oct-27, 06:41 PM
I overslept this morning.

Didn't wake up until 11:20: AM

The closer to Mag. five they get they more they get your attention, no?

I still dread getting pinned in my bed by the ceiling and then the place catching fire.

Why? Because it's a dreadful fate!

(Sheesh! Some people reading over your shoulder can asked the dumbest things!)

It happens to people here in the Bay Area whenever we get above a 7.

A lot of that stays local news.