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LiQuiDKain
2010-Jan-18, 07:06 PM
I was of the understanding that Jupiter, for example, eventually did have an inner core that was made out of a very exotic material such as liquid metallic hydrogen or something of that nature. In recent years, we've discovered many large gaseous giants orbiting very close to their host star. I've even heard CoRoT 7-b be referred to as an "evaporated core" of a planet that was Saturn-sized. My question is, supposing Jupiter is made of Metallaic Hydrogen, and it was dragged close enough to the sun that its atmosphere evaporated, what would be left? How would it go from a very strange non-terrestrial core to a body like CoRoT-7b? Why wouldn't the hydrogen simply decompress into less exotic forms of hydrogen? I'm probably wording this question all wrong, but in summery, I'd like to know what would happen if you cooked away Jupiter, and what would be left?

01101001
2010-Jan-18, 07:19 PM
I was of the understanding that Jupiter, for example, eventually did have an inner core that was made out of a very exotic material such as liquid metallic hydrogen or something of that nature.

Theory about that has drifted. It's probably now different from what you understood.

Universe Today: Jupiter Could Have Earth-like Rocky Core (http://www.universetoday.com/2008/11/26/jupiter-could-have-earth-like-rocky-core/):


Jupiter has a rocky core that is more than twice as large as previously thought, according to computer calculations by a geophysicist who simulated conditions inside the planet on the scale of individual hydrogen and helium atoms. "Our simulations show there is a big rocky object in the center surrounded by an ice layer and hardly any ice elsewhere in the planet," said Burkhard Militzer from University of California, Berkeley.

LiQuiDKain
2010-Jan-18, 08:55 PM
Interesting. Thanks.

Is that core still surrounded by liquid metallic hydrogen? I was of the understanding that LMH was the basis of Jupiter's outrageous magnetic field.

Hungry4info
2010-Jan-18, 10:50 PM
Yep. The liquid metallic hydrogen is still there.

swampyankee
2010-Jan-18, 10:57 PM
I was of the understanding that Jupiter, for example, eventually did have an inner core that was made out of a very exotic material such as liquid metallic hydrogen or something of that nature. In recent years, we've discovered many large gaseous giants orbiting very close to their host star. I've even heard CoRoT 7-b be referred to as an "evaporated core" of a planet that was Saturn-sized. My question is, supposing Jupiter is made of Metallaic Hydrogen, and it was dragged close enough to the sun that its atmosphere evaporated, what would be left? How would it go from a very strange non-terrestrial core to a body like CoRoT-7b? Why wouldn't the hydrogen simply decompress into less exotic forms of hydrogen? I'm probably wording this question all wrong, but in summery, I'd like to know what would happen if you cooked away Jupiter, and what would be left?

Whether the metallic hydrogen layer is left or not would depend on the details of its equation of state (EOS) and the temperature and pressure that exists at the boundary between the metallic hydrogen layer and the atmosphere, something that may not be exactly distinct.