Magnetism and Gravity -

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  1. rigney
    rigney
    To make the case for gravity, it must be understood that "it", gravity has not always been around. During the initial period of expansion and up through perhaps the first few million years, our universe was controlled exclusively by the strong arm of magnetism. It flourished as the super glue that gathered, bound and held material things together. While this process is still true today, it was a much easier task for magnetism to accomplish at that time, since the universe was still rather small. In a few words, "magnetism" was the strongest, meanest and only big dog on the block. Whom ever, or what ever created this universe knew that without this imbued and intrensic quality, a world as we view it now, could never have existed.!!
  2. John Jaksich
    John Jaksich
    Hello rigney,

    One response which I present to you is: if magnetism is a property of matter (or energy)- --does it not imply that gravity might (at least) co-exist at the same time that magnetism did?
  3. rigney
    rigney
    Seeing your question and trying to be diplomatric, I honestly must admit that I haven't a clue as to what gravity is, other than a manifstation of magnetism. Arbitrarily, gravity got its start only after galaxies were created. Prior to that time, magnetism was boss!!
  4. andro
    andro
    Hey,we can't say that magnetism was boss b'coze big bang was occurred due to gravity "a neutron star was collapsed into itself " I don't think there was any role of magnetism.
  5. John Jaksich
    John Jaksich
    I think the beauty of Astronomy and Cosmology is that it is a "natural science" and it---sometimes--is more fundamental than physics. Astronomy came before physics, so one can postulate (as in this instance) a Universe where magnetism came before (or at the same time as) gravity. But not as easily done?
  6. andro
    andro
    Well I wanna ask a ques-- why the revolving speed of different planets is different?
  7. John Jaksich
    John Jaksich
    Can you give me an example of what you mean?
  8. andro
    andro
    I just mean that all planets revolve,but some of them take more time to complete one revolution while some take less time. Eg: mercury takes approx. 176 days to complete one revolution as compared to earth. why is it so?
  9. John Jaksich
    John Jaksich
    Mercury takes approximately 88 days to orbit the Sun --and ~ 1407 hours to spin on its axis.

    I will post a link for it also----> Wiki-pedia

    Here is an interesting image of how Mercury is locked into orbit with the Sun . . . if you don't completely understand it just ask-- or go it the link which I provided.

  10. John Jaksich
    John Jaksich
    The orbital period of Mercury---along with spin are tidally locked with the Sun --but generally, it is said to behave according to Kepler's empirical laws of motion.

    I will illustrate from Wikipedia (Kepler's 2nd law):

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