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Thread: A general gardening thread

  1. #1081
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    Now that July is flying by the spring crops are all gone and the summer crops are going nutz. Lots of good tomatoes and cantaloupes coming in daily now, Spacedudette has wrapped up the pickling phase is now into canning salsa & sauce, and freezing tomatoes for winter soups, chili, etc. Peppers and eggplants doing quite well. Picked 12 cantaloupes today, they like coming in all at once. Looks like a total of 50 out there and the vines are still healthy. Look out neighbors....

    Took a chance picked the first watermelon today, it seemed to have passed all the main clues to ripeness, we'll see in a couple of days, that's assuming I can find room in one of the fridges (vine ripened cantaloupes don't store well at room temp for more than 1-2 days). Still picking lots of squash and cukes too, the later cukes are starting to bloom now. 2nd corn planting will be ready to pick in 1-2 days. The recent (and needed) rains have really given the gardens a boost. Few pest/diseases so far, only real complain is the stink bugs on the tomatoes and cabbage loopers on the Brussels sprouts.

  2. #1082
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    The Backroad Astronomer, its is your great plan of gardening. I also want to grow some plants. I realy like the roses plants like Rose, Lily, Daisy,and much more. I have also a small garden at my home. I daily go there and watch our plants and give them water on time and keep them neat and clean.It seems that you mostly like to grow the vegetables. Would you like to give me any suggestion for the safety of the Garden?

  3. #1083
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    Ugh, Groan, Whew!............. This is that time of summer (hopefully a short time) when gardening is for the birds. I love it but I'm a mid-day gardening fool (late sleeper) and this heat is deadly, esp on the plants. Today was a good day, just 94F and drippy humidity. Some plants are now shot and their ground will soon be prepped for fall veggie plantings by late August. The tomatoes have been very good and productive despite the onslaught of stink bugs which took out about 15% of the tomatoes, not bad for no pesticide use. The plants have stopped setting fruits in this heatwave.

    The cantaloupes are exhausted, picked the last dozen over the weekend. The watermelons are very good and sweet, esp my favorite orange variety called "Gold Strike", it's ambrosia if anything is. Probably 5-6 more melons then and they'll be done, about 35 total this season. The Peppers and eggplants are holding on good, still productive though the eggplants are losing a lot of leaves. The early cukes are drying up, that's expected by now, as the late cukes are now producing but are suffering under the heat. The squash is alive but dead. Sweet potato vines are looking Great despite some rabbit nibbling, I caught a red fox on the garden cam at 4am last week, the bunnies are disappearing.

    Harvested all the carrots before the worst of the heat hit, they should last us until the fall ones mature by late Oct. The pears are shaping up nicely again this year, no apples to speak of but the figs are returning after being froze back for 4 years. To top things off there are only 3 pomegranates which formed even though the bush was loaded down with blooms this year.....as you can tell I'm a bit more garden gabby when I'm trapped inside due to extreme heat outside. The next 3 daze will reach the heat index here around 115F........Everyone Stay Cool!

  4. #1084
    Quote Originally Posted by Bardin Jack View Post
    The Backroad Astronomer, its is your great plan of gardening. I also want to grow some plants. I realy like the roses plants like Rose, Lily, Daisy,and much more. I have also a small garden at my home. I daily go there and watch our plants and give them water on time and keep them neat and clean.It seems that you mostly like to grow the vegetables. Would you like to give me any suggestion for the safety of the Garden?
    Have gotta to admit most of rose bushes and trees were here long before me. Some were planted by my grandparents and I think a couple of the apple trees were here in 1800's. Simple thing about planting dig a hole several times the size the plant you are about to plant, mix organic fertilizer like manure or compost and a little 10-10-10 fertilizer that is 10 nitrogen,10 phosphate, 10 potash or potassium, if you can stuff with higher percentages the better. The number represents the percentage of the chemicals. About what type of plants go to a place that is a plant nursery and they could help you what is best for your region. Here we get really cold winters so a lot of plants that like the heat all year round do poorly here.
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  5. #1085
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacedude View Post
    Ugh, Groan, Whew!............. This is that time of summer (hopefully a short time) when gardening is for the birds. I love it but I'm a mid-day gardening fool (late sleeper) and this heat is deadly, esp on the plants. Today was a good day, just 94F and drippy humidity. Some plants are now shot and their ground will soon be prepped for fall veggie plantings by late August. The tomatoes have been very good and productive despite the onslaught of stink bugs which took out about 15% of the tomatoes, not bad for no pesticide use. The plants have stopped setting fruits in this heatwave.

    The cantaloupes are exhausted, picked the last dozen over the weekend. The watermelons are very good and sweet, esp my favorite orange variety called "Gold Strike", it's ambrosia if anything is. Probably 5-6 more melons then and they'll be done, about 35 total this season. The Peppers and eggplants are holding on good, still productive though the eggplants are losing a lot of leaves. The early cukes are drying up, that's expected by now, as the late cukes are now producing but are suffering under the heat. The squash is alive but dead. Sweet potato vines are looking Great despite some rabbit nibbling, I caught a red fox on the garden cam at 4am last week, the bunnies are disappearing.

    Harvested all the carrots before the worst of the heat hit, they should last us until the fall ones mature by late Oct. The pears are shaping up nicely again this year, no apples to speak of but the figs are returning after being froze back for 4 years. To top things off there are only 3 pomegranates which formed even though the bush was loaded down with blooms this year.....as you can tell I'm a bit more garden gabby when I'm trapped inside due to extreme heat outside. The next 3 daze will reach the heat index here around 115F........Everyone Stay Cool!
    You sound like you have a great garden due to a lot of work I am sure. Your mention of "stink bugs" was interesting as recently there has been a bit of publicity in Australia about them being responsible for entire shiploads of new cars being refused permission to not just unload in Australia but even being refused permission to enter Australian waters. The effect they had on your tomatoes makes the reason for the quarantine restrictions more obvious as I really hadn't heard of them before.https://www.carsales.com.au/editoria...n-cars-116485/
    Last edited by ozduck; 2019-Jul-19 at 07:40 AM.

  6. #1086
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    Thanks Ozduck, been gardening since about 6YO and have spoiled myself with home grown/vine ripened fruits/veggies. Store bought produce tastes dull in comparison, may have been a farmer in a previous life ;-).
    Yep, that's the bugger's pic alright, shaped like a shield and about as large as a fingernail. Hope you can keep these little devil Stink Bugs out of your continent. The damage they inflict is by puncturing a mosquito-like hole into fruits and veggies and then sucks out the fluids leaving scars/pock marks. A little damage can be peeled off but when in large numbers they can turn a tomato into a speckle ball. Below are a couple of maters that have been attacked, these 2 are salvageable. A typical orangish hybrid on the left and a Cherokee Purple heirloom on the right. Normally I'd be outside right now but it's humid 100F on my shaded back porch.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #1087
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacedude View Post
    Thanks Ozduck, been gardening since about 6YO and have spoiled myself with home grown/vine ripened fruits/veggies. Store bought produce tastes dull in comparison, may have been a farmer in a previous life ;-).
    Yep, that's the bugger's pic alright, shaped like a shield and about as large as a fingernail. Hope you can keep these little devil Stink Bugs out of your continent. The damage they inflict is by puncturing a mosquito-like hole into fruits and veggies and then sucks out the fluids leaving scars/pock marks. A little damage can be peeled off but when in large numbers they can turn a tomato into a speckle ball. Below are a couple of maters that have been attacked, these 2 are salvageable. A typical orangish hybrid on the left and a Cherokee Purple heirloom on the right. Normally I'd be outside right now but it's humid 100F on my shaded back porch.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Looks like it is certainly a nasty little critter, I do hope our bio-security controls keep working. They are strongly supported by most people.

    Heritage tomatoes - yummy. I love a nice tomato and yours sound like they would be great. Home grown vegetables picked when they are ripe are fabulous.

  8. #1088
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    Whew! The garden escaped last week's heat wave without too many bad effects other than the tomatoes halted pollination and watering everything manually had to be bumped up. A return to 80's this week allowed me to play catch up on weeding and grass cutting. The summer crops are winding down a bit now as the cantaloupes are done and I picked the last of the watermelons today. Those plots will be cleared and fertilized for planting the fall crops by late August.

    Corn plot #3 is now tasseling and and plot #4 is hip high. About 1/3 of the tomato plants are about done and are going down hill with blight diseases which is typical now. I planted 6 young tomato plants which hopefully will yield some new fruits by mid Sept into Oct. Sweet potato vines are going strong, peppers are doing well, eggplants & cukes look exhausted. Pears are doing nicely for a Sept harvest, the figs too. The 80's will return by Monday and hopefully some more rain next week too.

  9. #1089
    Been doing a little watering, weeding and debugging in the garden the last few days but only can take the heat for so long. Waiting for BIL to fix the oil tank on the wood splitter, moved a few pieces of wood out the way yesterday.
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  10. #1090
    Went out a couple of hours ago, walked in the field to check the blackberries nothing there. Planned to pick potato bugs but got distracted weeding, feeding and weeding some plants. I a Brussels sprout plant in a planter, in between the beets and few in other spots. Now the sun is setting I guess time to download the Skeptics guide and something else to do.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
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  11. #1091
    Just went to take a look at the garden. Some of the tomato plants have about a dozen tomatoes on them, pulled a carrot and they are about baby carrot sized already. Picked a few more zucchini, one of them got to baseball bat size, that one will probably be cut up and frozen more zucchini bread. There is a squash and it is almost ready to pick, I don't usually pick them until at least September, and the beans are loaded with flowers. The Brussel Sprouts, cucumbers and a few tomato plants are a little behind but been spreading manure to different plants, all we need some rain which might come later this week.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  12. #1092
    Well this evening I went for a few minutes to go out clear some of the stuff away for the wood splitter to move it. Then went int the garden and is completely over run with buck wheat and over weeds, I keep think about tilling under the garden in fall to see it the cold of winter will kill most of weeds n=but never got to it. Pulled a few spud plants there were few potatoes but it would be better without the grass roots.
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  13. #1093
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    After a setback caused by varmints a few weeks ago, my Kentucky Wonder pole beans are coming in like gangbusters. I suspect the culprit was a deer. I came home from a weekend trip to find the vines stripped of their leaves from a foot off the ground up to about five feet, but untouched above or below. I sprayed them with deer and rabbit repellant and now they have recovered. The tomatoes in an adjoining bed are going nowhere. I donít know whether itís varmints or just insufficient sunshine. The area is heavily wooded and no part of my yard gets more than about five hours of direct sunshine.

  14. #1094
    Yes tomatoes need sun. I have what the packet said were peppers but the flowers on the plant is nothing like what I have seen on a pepper planet before. Here is a picture of the pepper plant from above, can't really make out the flowers.
    https://twitter.com/DavidLPFairweat/...275650/photo/1
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  15. #1095
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    After a setback caused by varmints a few weeks ago, my Kentucky Wonder pole beans are coming in like gangbusters. I suspect the culprit was a deer. I came home from a weekend trip to find the vines stripped of their leaves from a foot off the ground up to about five feet, but untouched above or below. I sprayed them with deer and rabbit repellant and now they have recovered. The tomatoes in an adjoining bed are going nowhere. I don’t know whether it’s varmints or just insufficient sunshine. The area is heavily wooded and no part of my yard gets more than about five hours of direct sunshine.
    I just cooked a batch of them and they are great. I seasoned them with HerbOx chicken granules and minced onion.

  16. #1096
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    Astronomer, that looks like Basil to me, maybe? The flowers aren't right but the leaves look similar to basil, but there are many types of basil. Pepper leaves are longer and thinner like mine today in this pic:
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    Hornblower, for 5 hours of direct sunlight I'd recommend a cherry tomato, "Sungold" is our fav here, a very sweet orange tomato.

    Today should be our last 90's+ plus day here for a while so I grabbed the cabbage and broccoli transplants and put them in just before a storm dropped 1/3" of rain, more on the way with temps in the 80's for the next week or so. Also dug up the first sweet potatoes which look good. Planted carrot, spinach, beet seed too. Next to go in will be collards and turnips.

  17. #1097
    Quote Originally Posted by Spacedude View Post
    Astronomer, that looks like Basil to me, maybe? The flowers aren't right but the leaves look similar to basil, but there are many types of basil. Pepper leaves are longer and thinner like mine today in this pic:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Hornblower, for 5 hours of direct sunlight I'd recommend a cherry tomato, "Sungold" is our fav here, a very sweet orange tomato.

    Today should be our last 90's+ plus day here for a while so I grabbed the cabbage and broccoli transplants and put them in just before a storm dropped 1/3" of rain, more on the way with temps in the 80's for the next week or so. Also dug up the first sweet potatoes which look good. Planted carrot, spinach, beet seed too. Next to go in will be collards and turnips.
    Not basil, have plenty of goring nearby, don't look at all the same.
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  18. #1098
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    Well the summer crops are winding down or gone now, still getting peppers, eggplants, some tomatoes from the late plants, and down to the last few ears of corn with 5 melons in the spare fridge. Dug up the first wave of sweet potatoes and they're in the process of curing. Will dig up the last batch before first frost around Halloween.

    Now it's time for the Autumn crops. All seeds and transplants are in the ground now which includes broccoli, cabbages, carrots, beets, spinach, collards, and turnips. I'll plant some more turnip seed in early Sept and more spinach around mid Nov for an early Spring spinach harvest (it overwinters well). That should do it, also dismantling the staked early tomato plants which are shot. Will be picking pears in about 10 days, picking some figs now too, there's even 5 pomegranates on the bush this year. Next year I'll be downsizing the gardens by about 1/3 which means less corn, cantaloupes, and watermelons, it's getting more difficult to keep up now that I'm way past my prime, ugh. All-in-all it's been a good year.

  19. #1099
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    After a setback caused by varmints a few weeks ago, my Kentucky Wonder pole beans are coming in like gangbusters. I suspect the culprit was a deer. I came home from a weekend trip to find the vines stripped of their leaves from a foot off the ground up to about five feet, but untouched above or below. I sprayed them with deer and rabbit repellant and now they have recovered. The tomatoes in an adjoining bed are going nowhere. I don’t know whether it’s varmints or just insufficient sunshine. The area is heavily wooded and no part of my yard gets more than about five hours of direct sunshine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    I just cooked a batch of them and they are great. I seasoned them with HerbOx chicken granules and minced onion.
    "Them"??? The pole beans, the tomatoes, or the varmints?
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  20. #1100
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    Mmmmm, venison!
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  21. #1101
    Picked most of tomatoes so we would have enough to make some chow pickles.
    https://twitter.com/DavidLPFairweat/...686017/photo/1

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  22. #1102
    Plus another picture of the mystery pepper plant.
    https://twitter.com/DavidLPFairweat/...972544/photo/1
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  23. #1103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    After a setback caused by varmints a few weeks ago, my Kentucky Wonder pole beans are coming in like gangbusters. I suspect the culprit was a deer. I came home from a weekend trip to find the vines stripped of their leaves from a foot off the ground up to about five feet, but untouched above or below. I sprayed them with deer and rabbit repellant and now they have recovered. The tomatoes in an adjoining bed are going nowhere. I donít know whether itís varmints or just insufficient sunshine. The area is heavily wooded and no part of my yard gets more than about five hours of direct sunshine.
    I just now picked another pound and a half of beans. If I remember correctly they will keep producing until a killing frost puts a stop to it. All of this has been from about an ounce of seeds. By one of the wonders of nature the plants are produced mostly from carbon dioxide and water, with very little solid material extracted from the soil. That little bit of soluble mineral material contributes to giving each type of plant its characteristics, as regulated by its genes.

    ETA: There is also nitrogen from the air and the soil in the finished product.
    Last edited by Hornblower; 2019-Sep-07 at 11:46 PM. Reason: Nitrogen

  24. #1104
    Took a quick break from the wood and checked the garden or what is left of it. Pick the rest of the beets, some carrots and a few zucchini. Next year I think I might not have a garden and get some garden fabric and cover it and smother out the weeds.
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  25. 2019-Sep-18, 11:09 AM


  26. #1105
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    Time for an Oct update.......
    Autumn temps have finally settled in so the fall crops are relaxing and growing well now despite the ongoing drought conditions since late Aug. It would be a dust bowl out there if not for the deep well to keep things alive. Right now the late tomatoes are kicking in and this will be the best Oct in several years for tomatoes. The broccoli and cabbages are looking real good as the heads start to form up. The eggplants are gone but the peppers are holding on. Picking collards, spinach, and turnips now as they recover from the recent heatwave. Carrots and beets are looking good too and should be ready to pick in about 3-4 weeks. The last of the sweet potatoes will be dug up in the coming days, an excellent harvest this year.

    On the fruit side of the coin, the pears were all harvested and many are in cool storage, most were canned as pear sauce to use in the coming year. The Japanese persimmons are turning a light orange now and should be at peak sweetness soon. Still have a few pomegranates hanging on as they are slow to ripen.

    Second generation of zinnias and cosmos are putting on a good display.
    One last lawn mowing is due but not until I see a decent rain coming, little chance in sight now.

  27. #1106
    Well pulled the tomato cages and put the glass away for the cold frame, felt a bit silly when I bought some cherry tomatoes at the grocery store while there some tomatoes we waiting to see if they rippen.
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  28. #1107
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    A couple of weeks ago, I harvested my parsnips and carrots. They turned into real whoppers. Made some roast veg and mish mash with them. Good times. Now I can spend the next months not having to worry about the patch.

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  29. #1108
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    The recent autumn weather has been good for the gardens but our first hard freeze will hit here in 3 days. Presently picking spinach. collards, turnips, broccoli, & cabbages. The carrots and beets are next. Will be picking the remaining tomatoes (still green) and peppers before the freeze. Picked all the persimmons and will be jamming soon. Planted the last spinach seed for an extra early spring harvest. Also, dug up the last of the sweet potatoes. All's well, a hint of snow in next week's forecast.

  30. #1109
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    As my companions on the east coast are realizing, autumn seems officially over today! A winter wonderland outside with an inch of snow covering almost everything and temps dropping to around 20F for the next 2 nights, it'll be a slow melt with a high in the 30's tomorrow. I picked the most mature cabbages and broccoli just before temps dropped below freezing, brought in all the picked persimmons from the porch, and set up the hens water warmer. The collards, turnips, carrots, and spinach should be ok and hopefully the immature broccoli and cabbages will get through this extra early freeze intact, a light blanket of snow might even help. Can't recall getting snow before Thxgiving which is still over 2 weeks away. Hard to believe that it hit 70F yesterday.

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