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Thread: A general gardening thread

  1. #781
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    The spinach is on a roll here, it doesn't mind cold temps and picking every 3-4 days is good. Hope to plant peas maybe tomorrow before the snow hits again if it doesn't rain. May wait to do it when planting the potatoes in a few days. Plum blooms are fading now, they may have survived the recent snow and freezes, at least later no thinning required. Pear buds are re-awakening. Daffodils peaking. Was hoping for some tulips but the voles finished them off. The cold temps have kept the grass at bay, that's good.

  2. #782
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    I'm quite the amateur really. In fact, that's too generous.

    Looking to rehabilitating the lawn, I doled out some fresh top soil in the ugly patches (which is no insignificant portion) and sprinkled a whole bunch of lawn seed all around. There's clearly a lot of work for the grass to do.

    I mowed for the first time the luscious overgrowth a few weeks ago, it has now gone quite not green in large parts. I'm hoping it's just a little traumatised by the mowing and the snow and regreens now that spring has started.

    I've read that it can happen when grass is cut too much. It goes ugly for a few weeks.

  3. #783
    These seeds are mostly for classrooms but would be interesting to try.
    http://tomatosphere.letstalkscience.ca/
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  4. #784
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    Prepped the Peas bed & trellis today for planting tomorrow, still cold here but it's already behind schedule along with the potatoes and lettuce. Soil is barely workable after that last snow. We may dodge the next snow that'll brush by us tomorrow nite. The strawberries are usually in bloom by now but they're mostly still hidden under their pine needle mulch. Pears blossoms are starting to open now, come on Spring!

  5. #785
    Well got starting soil and no seeds, by the time I got to nursery they were closing and tried debit but it didn't work.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
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  6. #786
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glom View Post
    I'm quite the amateur really. In fact, that's too generous.

    Looking to rehabilitating the lawn, I doled out some fresh top soil in the ugly patches (which is no insignificant portion) and sprinkled a whole bunch of lawn seed all around. There's clearly a lot of work for the grass to do.

    I mowed for the first time the luscious overgrowth a few weeks ago, it has now gone quite not green in large parts. I'm hoping it's just a little traumatised by the mowing and the snow and regreens now that spring has started.

    I've read that it can happen when grass is cut too much. It goes ugly for a few weeks.
    I may have some answers for you Mr. Glom.

    Grass early in the year doesn't have any starch reserves in their roots, as they used it to produce the grass blade in the first place.

    (In cattle ranching, good ranchers fence off the fields closest to where the cattle are kept in early spring to give the grass time to build up said reserves. If I recall correctly, about six to eight weeks once the grass is at least four inches tall. After that the grass can be grazed for the rest of the year without killing it, assuming otherwise proper field use and such.)

    Also, how short do you cut the grass? If you leave it longer you have to cut more often, but the grass does better. I set the height of the mower blades to at least 3 to 3.5 inches. This also helps with water consumptions as the grass blades shade their neighbors roots.

    Your only variable I know nothing about is the effect of snow. Dry ice yes, snow no.

    (As a nefarious youth I may have know somebody who spelled disparaging phrases in five foot tall letters on the large front lawn of a rival high school with a couple of hundred pounds of crushed dry ice. Prior to the big game of course.)
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
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  7. #787
    Sunny, mild with bit of a breeze. Got a new saw blade for the bow saw finished cutting up pole into logs and turned a couple into kindling. Now the funny thing is that I need to get some cedar poles to train the grape vine on, got plenty "in storage" but need the snow melt to get access to them, and cut them down. A couple of branches of an apple tree looked they were dying so the came off, the snow underneath gives you a couple inches more reach. Now have to warm up and dry off the feet.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
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  8. #788
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    Planted the peas, lettuce, and radish seed yesterday, will hold off a bit more on the potatoes. Started the tomatoes indoors too.

  9. #789
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    We had two trees taken down last Friday. I planted them both about 20 years ago, a pecan and a sweet gum. The pecan had been damaged by Ike (took its leader) and it never fully recovered, going our more than up, requiring a lot of pruning. The sweet gum had grown straight and tall, but the gum balls were a real nuisance.

    So we're left with a live oak in the front and a red maple and a Natchez crepe in the back. The oak was probably here before the house was built; the other two I also planted. (Well, the crepe was an established tree transplanted from work when they expanded the office.)
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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  10. #790
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    Sweet Gums have beautiful autumn foliage as we had one at our previous home. I tried composting the gum balls but they take too long to break down. They do a good job on dulling up the lawn mower blades too while firing them off like a machine gun.

  11. #791
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    And the gum balls are lots of fun to step on when you're not wearing hard soled shoes. Nature's Lego blocks.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They donít alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

    Moderation will be in purple.
    Rules for Posting to This Board

  12. #792
    There is one less dead poplar tree around, although it crushed a few raspberry canes on the way down but they will grow back.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  13. #793
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    Got most of the potatoes planted, Yukon Gold - a good all around tater variety. I'm trying out a short row of Kennebec tomorrow, a more stout baker. Our cat is mad, I placed the tomato tray in it's favorite sunny window spot for warmth. I'll need to save seeds this season, running low on 2 fav heirlooms. Weather improving though soil is still cold, a seasonal warming trend is coming up on us this week.

  14. #794
    One thing I miss from when you grow you potatoes are the little ones so nice to cook up whole.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  15. #795
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spacedude View Post
    I'm no orchid specialist, although I do grow lots of outdoor fruits & veggies there is not one single indoor potted plant in our house. There are several variables involved in growing orchids successfully.
    These sites below may be of help....

    http://www.aos.org/orchids/additiona...s-indoors.aspx

    http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/orchids
    Thank you! The links are very helpful!

  16. #796
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    The dhalia bulb is clearly rotten. But since I had a mole hill in the garden, I popped it in there to see what will happen.

    The mole hill is the result of me digging a hole to plant the polyanthus fire dragon. It's spent two weeks in the living room and kept some nice blooms. A small branch in particular has bloomed a couple of blooms in the last few days wth more on the way. Now I'll see how it does in its final home.

  17. #797
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    Hey! I just found out one man's polyanthus is another man's primula!

    I Googled it to see what they looked like and recognized the foliage immediately.

    Nice flowers by the way.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
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  18. #798
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    Funnily enough, this particular variant wasn't listed on the RHS website. Looked nice in the shop though and the label said it was okay in an acidic environment. I hope it's okay with the British weather though. In fact, it's so British today, it's Scottish.

  19. #799
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    Dropped a couple of hundred bucks towards my balcony garden this weekend. Bought two hanging color baskets, two fuchsias trained into tree shapes, (var. gartenmiesterbonstead). Two bright orange black-eyed susans plus I have two large pots planted with coleus seeds, a variety called "Black Dragon" due to its black and red foliage. Had to send away to China for the seeds.
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
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  20. #800
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    Looks like the polyanthus has done fine over the easter weekend either in spite of or because of the relentless rain. I went out to do some deadheading and found the blooms mostly looking very food. The leaves look good too.

  21. #801
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    Maybe spoke too soon. Big temperature jump today and it doesn't like it.

  22. #802
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    Finally finished planting all of the early spring crops. Peas and radishes are the first to slowly break ground.The fruit trees are all looking good other than the plums, figs, and pomegranate. We hit the single digits too many times this past winter for those last 2 guys. Strawberries blooming now and blueberries budding up. Spinach picking continues.
    The summer crops go in the warmer ground by mid May if the seasonal warming trend continues. No freezes are expected in the long term but it's still a bit early, it cools down to 35-39F on most nights. A possible snow/rain mix on Sat?

  23. #803
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    Actually, I think it was the wind what done it. So sad. A promising young branch and luscious head of flowers snapped off their stems. I'm quite upset.

  24. #804
    Just saw a post from the local greenhouse. They have started selling hydroponics supplies, hmm I wonder if that has anything to do with a plant becoming legal across Canada soon, not into myself. Yes I know there is a lot of other stuff you can grow that way.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  25. #805
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    Finished off the spring veggie planting yesterday with rows of carrot and beet seeding, just in time for a nice rain to tuck them in today. Temps may dip to around freezing tonite but that shouldn't harm the fruit trees that are now blooming.

  26. #806
    With all the worry with the seeds I all forgot that I have re lookup the part information for the tiller and order the parts they cane take a couple weeks to get delivered.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  27. #807
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    The polyanthus isn't looking too hot. From inside the bright yellow and red petals look good but up close things are less good with grey speckles and little holes. Who would have thought that an unprotected plant outside in two weeks of constant rain would develop fungal issues? And while dead heading I found a slug sleeping in one of the flowers. I gave the plant a dose of the Bayer, both antifungal and antibug.

    The heuchera on the other hand is looking lovely and even some grass seed has started to germinate. And inside, the money plant has pepped up recently.

    Looks like I'm just not very good with flowering plants. But that is insufficient because my Figment rock is from the Epcot International Flower and Garden festival so it can't ornament a garden without flowers.

  28. #808
    Finally got the seeds, something to do next week while it is raining.
    It cost a lot for such a small bag. This is just for the tomatoes, peppers, squash,tomatoes, herbs, tomatoes. There still are the peas, beans, potatoes, beets and other direct plant crops.
    I hope I have enough potting soil. didn't get to the garage to order the parts but I think they were closed I probably just call in over the week.
    Last edited by The Backroad Astronomer; 2018-Apr-14 at 09:38 PM.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  29. #809
    Does anyone know how to egg eggplant?
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
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  30. #810
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    Egging an eggplant isn't overly easy, I can't do it either ;-)
    Gardening is heating up bigtime, we got 2.25" rain overnite and needed it, 3" behind for the year. Planted the first block of corn yesterday and prepped the butterbean poles. Peas are 4" high and radishes are doing fine, lettuces are a bit slow going. Picking spinach 3-4 times a week now.

    Potatoes are breaking ground while the brocs and cabbages are bulking up. Strawberries are setting at post bloom and blueberries are attracting bees. To my surprise there are a lot of plums on the 2 trees that I thought for sure were frostbit. 3 trees loaded down with tiny pears, the peaches and apples are in bloom, spring seems to be springing along. Indoor tomato seedlings about 2" tall and the cukes & melons are to be started indoors this week. The red dogwoods are spectacular!

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