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Thread: Films of 2011

  1. #61
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    They didn't much end up in between, is my understanding.
    _____________________________________________
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    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  2. #62
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    Seeing that the Norse amongst other places ended up as mercenaries in Constantinople, it's a fair assessment to say that they got there.
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    Chase after the truth like all hell and you'll free yourself, even though you never touch its coat tails. Clarence Darrow
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  3. #63
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    VERY late this week; but as you can see, there was a lot to get through.

    For the week of Friday, 11 March


    Battle: Los Angeles: This movie’s simultaneous release leaves no doubt as to its intentions. It is a blockbuster in waiting and will accept nothing less. Much can be said about the trailer, but what strikes me most forcibly is how little the camera shakes, how clear the images are, how long the shots. Despite trying to echo the feel of rolling 24 hour news, it appears that this film, unlike most blockbusters of recent memory, isn’t also interested in imparting migraine on its audience. For that, I can forgive the obvious lifts from The War of the Worlds (though, refreshingly, from the novel rather than the 1953 film, unlike Independence Day). BTW, if this film reminds you of Skyline, that’s because the Brothers Strouse, who made that movie, also did the FX on this production, and are currently being sued for copyright as a result.

    US

    Red Riding Hood: The first of a slew of oncoming fairytale-related film projects (this, dearies, is what happens when you give a billion dollars to Alice in Wonderland and Twilight), this is directed by Catherine Hardwicke, who, natch, directed Twilight but also directed the underappreciated Thirteen. If it weren’t for that trailer, I’d say this had a chance of being good; Red Riding Hood is the ur-myth underlying every horror flick after all, and it is clearly drawing on the “werewolf” legend of serial killer Peter Stumpp, which was an idea I had once, damn it. But it’s quite clear that, rather than taking any risks whatsoever, this is hitting all the Twilight beats, even getting Gary Oldman to re-don his foppish, Prince Vlad hairdo from Bram Stoker’s Dracula Still, at least I still have The Company of Wolves, and with Neil Jordan doing The Graveyard Book and Heart-Shaped Box, maybe a sequel isn’t far off?

    Black Death: Technically a 2010 release, but I wanted to offer a warning to Americans: whatever this film is being advertised as, don’t believe it. It is neither action nor horror. It’s more interesting (though perhaps less entertaining) than that. The best I can describe it is as a hybrid of The Wicker Man and The Deer Hunter, though that may be giving it slightly too much credit.

    Jane Eyre: I’ve never been a massive fan of the novel. I don’t dislike it; I even have it in my house, somewhere. But let’s just say I know where I keep my copy of Wide Sargasso Sea. That said, my slowly, inexorably burgeoning crush on Mia Wasikowska may compel me to see this anyway.

    Mars Needs Moms: This is a Disney movie. That means I can’t even blame Dreamworks. God help us all.

    Skateland: Dude, like you know when there’s, like, this time in your life when you just don’t have a frigging clue what you’re gonna do, and you’re like, totally aimless and, like without your guiding star so you just move around in a haze like and just screw around? That’s like, universal, man. So chill.

    Elektra Luxx: There is a certain segment of the male population who, upon hearing the phrase “Carla Gugino plays a porn star”, will simply drift off into a golden sunny cloud. No further information required. Nevertheless, given how bad it could have been, I’m mildly impressed with the trailer. It actually seems to aim at more sophisticated emotions than other raunchy comedies we’ve been seeing of late. I hasten to add that that isn’t saying much.

    I AM: For a split second I thought this was finally the adaptation of I Have No Mouth, And I Must Scream that I’ve been waiting my whole life for. But no. I gotta give Tom Shadyac credit; he may have directed Ace Ventura and The Nutty Professor, but at least he knows he’s a lesser man than Desmond Tutu. I doubt Michael Bay would have been as deferent. It’s good to see a guy take on this kind of project, and at least he seems to be interviewing people who know what they’re talking about, but the tone of this doc comes awfully close to What the Bleep Do We Know?.

    Forks Over Knives: This could be a decent expose, or it could be nutritionist bunk. Unfortunately, the trailer doesn’t reveal enough to judge, which makes me suspect the latter.

    Monogamy: Guy’s getting married in three months but he’s having second thoughts because he wants to stalk a bottle-blonde bimbo with his camera. Body Double/Blow-Up knockoff.

    Surrogate Valentine: Quiet little road movie about a mildly autistic guy with a talent for music. Trailer doesn’t really go anywhere but it looks sweet.

    3 Backyards: Embeth Davidtz! I haven’t seen her in years! And yes, she’s still beautiful, so I can’t drop the obvious “Honey, you got real ugly” line, not that I would anyway. Some other great actresses here too: Edie Falco, Katherine Erbe. I have no idea what this movie’s about but it does look intriguing, eerie, and beautifully shot.

    I Will Follow: Looks like a subtle, observational relationship drama. Very easy on the eyes too, though shot through with such a pervasive almond light it vaguely resembles a Nescafe commercial.

    Redland: Steamy, torrid thriller about an illicit affair in the swamplands of the American South during the Depression. Not sure about it just yet; it relies a bit too much on oversaturated colour and soft-focus for my tastes; makes it seem like a 70s porn flick.

    Clash: Asian chopsocky goodness from Vietnam. Nice to see them following the Thais and the Mandarins into Hong Kong action; shame about the dreary washed out colour scheme.

    UK

    Terry: Hard, grey, spit-on-the-pavement piece of London grit. Plot is similar to Man Bites Dog, though it doesn’t look nearly as disturbing; a documentary filmmaker decides to follow a mumbling gangland psychopath named Terry, with predictably violent results.

    His & Hers: Gentle-looking Irish documentary about female perspectives on love, from young girlhood to old age.

    Life Goes On: I like Om Puri, but I was not really into this trailer at all until it took a sudden turn in it's final seconds. Now I'm not sure if I like it more or less.

    Lord of the Dance 3D: Uh, yeah. Pretty much what it says. If that floats your boat…

    Norwegian Wood: Who knew the bestselling novel in Japanese history was named for a Beatles song? Well obviously anyone who knows more about Japan than me, but I had no clue.That’s just cool. And the trailer looks fantastic. Whoever made this movie obviously took the adaptation seriously, as I’m sure its home audience expected.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    Jane Eyre: I’ve never been a massive fan of the novel. I don’t dislike it; I even have it in my house, somewhere. But let’s just say I know where I keep my copy of Wide Sargasso Sea. That said, my slowly, inexorably burgeoning crush on Mia Wasikowska may compel me to see this anyway.
    Arguably, the end of one of my relationships came because he couldn't understand why Jane wouldn't just live with Mr. Rochester. I think we learned a great deal about each other in that conversation. But I will be going to see this, because I love the book and I love Mia Wasikowska, even if I can't reliably remember her last name.

    Mars Needs Moms: This is a Disney movie. That means I can’t even blame Dreamworks. God help us all.
    I wish I'd heard something good about it. I love Berke Breathed, and I really want to like the movie. But I almost certainly won't.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  5. #65
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    Again, very late this week. Is everyone OK with me going on with this? I don't mean to sound like an ingrate, but these things take a LOT of effort to put together

    For the week of Friday, 18 March


    US

    Paul: I missed this out on its British debut, scary deadlines etc. I’ve seen it, and if there’s one thing I know for certain after watching it, it’s that Edgar Wright is a genius. This movie, unlike Simon Pegg and Nick Frost’s other two cinematic collaborations, (Shaun of the Dead; Hot Fuzz) was without his influence, and it showed. Not that it’s bad in any way- it’s funnier and wittier than most comedies out there right now, but it lacks the inspiration, wit and depth that Wright brought to the table, both visually and verbally. But it has Pegg’s trademark heart and the duo’s easy chemistry, and Paul isn’t quite as obnoxious in the finished film as he appears in that trailer.

    Limitless: or, Let’s Give Robert de Niro Another Excuse to Line His Pockets Between Meet the Fockers Sequels in the Vain Hope That He May Turn Out Something Interesting Again Some Day. Can you believe it’s taken this many superhero flicks to come up with a Power Pill storyline? How pathetic.

    The Lincoln Lawyer: When I first heard of this, I thought, “It’s either a promo for some weird new construction toy, or it’s a biopic of Abraham Lincoln’s lawyer.” Actually it’s neither. It’s about a lawyer who drives a Lincoln. Seriously. Matthew McConaughey appears to have put his career on reset, going back to the same legal thrillers that made him a name in the first place. And I have to say, however dull this looks, it at least looks better than A Time To Kill.

    Win Win: Fairly traditional by the standards of writer/director Thomas McCarthy, who brought Peter Dinklage to international attention with The Station Agent. Looks funny in spots (that kid reads her lines like a pro) but I’m getting a bit tired of watching Paul Giamatti play Paul Giamatti.

    Tornado Alley: A movie spinoff of Storm Chasers, which was inspired by Twister, with the same plot as Twister and narrated by Bill Paxton, who was in Twister. I’m pretty sure it’s a documentary, but I have to say that once you go that meta, it doesn’t really matter.

    Winter in Wartime: A young boy risks everything to save a downed British aviator in Nazi-occupied Holland. Doesn’t look like it treads much new ground (it’s basically Allo, Allo without the laughs) but the cinematography looks great, and the wartime resistance deserves all the commemoration it can get.

    The Music Never Stopped: Another perfectly acceptable movie about getting over a uniquely debilitating illness. I have nothing against these movies, but once you’ve seen one, you’ve generally seen them all.

    The Desert of Forbidden Art: Fascinating looking doc about a trove of banned Soviet art uncovered in a desert in Uzbekistan. Perhaps its discovery bodes well for the treasures currently being crushed and seized in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Desert Flower: with it’s uninspired title and tired rags-to-riches theme, I was ready to hate this. But actually it developed into something far more interesting than it initially suggested.

    UK:

    Chalet Girl: It seems chalet girl is the career for every aspiring young British girl who can’t get into the competitive fields of footballer’s girlfriend or topless model. This movie almost seems like a parody of itself, to the point when the trailer was effectively apologising for its own existence.

    Anovahood: That’s “another hood” to you and me. Basically the life story of Ali G.

    Benda Bilili!: This is a documentary, though you won’t believe it. It feels and looks like the most inspiring rock biopic you’ve ever seen. It follows a band of paraplegics in the slums of Kinshasa, “capital” of the lawless Democratic Republic of Congo, as they make their way from bombed out rubble to the stage. It’s hard to imagine an environment less conducive to human life as that which these are forced to live in, but these people’s joy and optimism is beyond inspirational.

    Between the Canals: Worth a look just to see if you can decipher the impenetrably thick Irish patois. Seems a bit too similar to last month’s NEDS, and not nearly as well-directed.

    Route Irish: At some point, Ken Loach may have known the meaning of the word “compromise”, but he threw away the dictionary years ago. So when he takes on the Iraq War, expect no prisoners. An actor in this film actually sued Loach for torture after that waterboarding sequence got too authentic.

    Submarine: Literate examination of the awkwardness of young love, with some nice cinematic irony (“I wish I had a film crew following my every move…”). This is the cinematic debut of director Richard Ayoade, better known (to a very small section of the population) as the creator of Garth Marenghi. And is there a British film out right now that doesn’t star Paddy Considine or Sally Hawkins?
    Last edited by parallaxicality; 2011-Mar-20 at 12:15 PM.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

  6. #66
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    I appreciate the effort you go through for these. Often, it is a way to find out about movies (usually the UK releases) I'd never heard of. It's just that this is a particularly dismal time of year for releases.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    Again, very late this week. Is everyone OK with me going on with this? I don't mean to sound like an ingrate, but these things take a LOT of effort to put together
    Please, keep 'em coming!

    When you can come out with a line like, "but I have to say that once you go that meta, it doesn’t really matter" I'll keep reading even if the films don't interest me!

  8. #68
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    I don't post enough in this thread, but I do appreciate the effort you put into it.

    However:
    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    Tornado Alley: A movie spinoff of Storm Chasers, which was inspired by Twister, with the same plot as Twister and narrated by Bill Paxton, who was in Twister. Iím pretty sure itís a documentary, but I have to say that once you go that meta, it doesnít really matter.
    That may be a great line, but you've got this completely backwards. Scientific storm chasing actually came first. Twister was very loosely based on existing research efforts (mostly the TOTO drop probe used in the '80s, with a little bit of the VORTEX 1 project).

    Tornado Alley is one of those IMAX-only documentaries that play at science museums and the like. The Storm Chasers series is a spin-off of this film, originally about director Sean Casey's attempts to get footage from inside a tornado. It may have influenced the film: instead of being just about tornadoes or VORTEX 2, Casey's intercept vehicle is interesting enough that he put himself in his movie. That's the meta bitósome of the documentary is about the effort to make the documentary itself.

    I'll probably go see this one, even though the nearest showing is an hour's drive from me.

  9. #69
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    As I recall, the documentary series Storm Chasers premiered after Twister. Cable channels have a long habit of launching documentary series on the backs of popular films. So perhaps, if Twister was inspired by this guy's work, the decision to greenlight his series was inspired by the success of Twister. Which would make this even more meta.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    The Lincoln Lawyer: When I first heard of this, I thought, ďItís either a promo for some weird new construction toy, or itís a biopic of Abraham Lincolnís lawyer.Ē Actually itís neither. Itís about a lawyer who drives a Lincoln. Seriously. Matthew McConaughey appears to have put his career on reset, going back to the same legal thrillers that made him a name in the first place. And I have to say, however dull this looks, it at least looks better than A Time To Kill.
    I think if you liked A Time To Kill then you'll like this one. I did. Not as deep of a movie as ATTK I think, but some similarities as far as lawyer movies go.

    And I appreciate this thread as well.

  11. #71
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    Plus one for the effort involved. Keep em coming!

  12. #72
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    parallaxicality, I would never try to pressure you to keep doing these updates, especially if you have more pressing things to do in real life. However, I do find them entertaining (even if I will never see most of these films), so I would be a little sad if they ended.

  13. #73
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    Oh no, don't worry; I just needed confirmation that they were being read and that people were finding them useful.

    OK, back on schedule.

    For the week of Friday, 25 March

    US

    Sucker Punch: I may be rushing to judgement here; maybe it’s because I have experience on the wards myself, but I find the idea behind this movie instinctively repulsive. Take a bunch of young girls (make sure they’re hot, of course) trap them in a mental institution, and then have them escape by using clues found in their own (suspiciously male-oriented) fantasies. Er, how exactly is this supposed to work? To say nothing of the fact that descending further into your own delusions is just about the LAST thing you should do if you want to get out of a loony bin. The sad thing is I’m sure you’ll get some woman vox pop on the news saying how this depicts female empowerment. No. It does not.

    Bonnie and Clyde vs. Dracula: Hollywood must really be scared of Sucker Punch if they’re putting this up as its main competition. I gotta admit though, this looks about as good as a movie called Bonnie and Clyde vs. Dracula could be. I mean if you’re even thinking about going to see a movie called Bonnie and Clyde vs. Dracula, its somewhat of a given that you’ve lowered your sights, and this trailer delivers to my meagre expectations.

    Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2: Roderick Rules: Were kid movies this bad when I was a kid? I think so. But then I always stayed away from these kinds of films; I preferred movies like The Goonies or Monster Squad; fantastical escapist rides that were far far away from the pain and cruelty I was suffering at the time. Some kids may find this funny, I dunno. I doubt anyone who vaguely resembles the lead character will.

    Peep World: Comedy about a wealthy, talented dysfunctional family that implodes over sudden exposure. This actually feels kinda fun, with a real Arrested Development/Royal Tannenbaums vibe. Great cast (Dexter!), and cool that Lewis Black is narrating. But I can’t say it made me spill my tea with laughter.

    Potiche: Hey, Catherine’s back! Still looks great. How old is she now? I’m sure she’s had work but she certainly has been looking after herself better then Gerard Depardieu, who really, really, really shouldn’t be given a role in which he criticises another character for having a heart attack. And I’m pretty sure that was an Umbrellas of Charbourg reference there.

    White Irish Drinkers: With this, The Town and The Departed, it seems Irish Americans have become the new Italian Americans. Perhaps The Sopranos was the final overdose, and this is our criminal stereotype methadone.

    The 5th Quarter: This is the kind of plot summary that just screams “Yadda yadda yadda”; true story about a sports hero whose brother dies, but who rises above it to push himself to ever greater whatevers.

    UK

    The Cave of Forgotten Dreams: I don’t see in 3D, so whatever effects Herzog was planning to produce in his Lascaux doc, I won’t know what they are. I’m still seeing this though. I hope that that music isn’t in the actual film, because I want to experience what Herzog felt in that cave: silence.

    A Turtle’s Tale: Sammy’s Adventures: Tepid Finding Nemo ripoff.

    Wake Wood: The “New Hammer” does another well-executed creepfest, as a grieving couple are offered another chance to see their dead daughter by Timothy Spall’s slimy cult leader. The imagery in that trailer was pretty intense.
    Last edited by parallaxicality; 2011-Mar-21 at 06:58 PM.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    Potiche: Hey, Catherine’s back! Still looks great. How old is she now?
    67 and still a head turner.
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    Being ignorant is not so much a shame, as being unwilling to learn. Benjamin Franklin
    Chase after the truth like all hell and you'll free yourself, even though you never touch its coat tails. Clarence Darrow
    A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read. Mark Twain

  15. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    Sucker Punch: I may be rushing to judgement here; maybe it’s because I have experience on the wards myself, but I find the idea behind this movie instinctively repulsive. Take a bunch of young girls (make sure they’re hot, of course) trap them in a mental institution, and then have them escape by using clues found in their own (suspiciously male-oriented) fantasies. Er, how exactly is this supposed to work? To say nothing of the fact that descending further into your own delusions is just about the LAST thing you should do if you want to get out of a loony bin. The sad thing is I’m sure you’ll get some woman vox pop on the news saying how this depicts female empowerment. No. It does not.
    My two best friends are going to go see it together. Possibly with Graham, though his reaction to the commercial was "What the [BAUT inappropriate but relatively tame] word was that?" One of my best friends is also seriously mentally ill, but she thinks it looks entertaining. What she's worried about is that Magical Mentally Ill Person will be the new thing. Personally, I think it looks like the same kind of ridiculous action-fest we've been getting a lot of lately, except it all takes place in a crazy person's head. Maybe a sort of Doctor Parnassus with explosions? I have a feeling it would just make me bored and mad at the same time.

    Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2: Roderick Rules: Were kid movies this bad when I was a kid? I think so. But then I always stayed away from these kinds of films; I preferred movies like The Goonies or Monster Squad; fantastical escapist rides that were far far away from the pain and cruelty I was suffering at the time. Some kids may find this funny, I dunno. I doubt anyone who vaguely resembles the lead character will.
    Well, but that's the thing; The Goonies was a children's movie of (apparently) our time. Or anyway young adult. But I do think those movies were better in the '80s and into the early '90s. Disney comes and goes in cycles independent of the live action market, but I think there are times and places where live action kids' and family movies are better. This is not one of them.

    The Cave of Forgotten Dreams: I don’t see in 3D, so whatever effects Herzog was planning to produce in his Lascaux doc, I won’t know what they are. I’m still seeing this though. I hope that that music isn’t in the actual film, because I want to experience what Herzog felt in that cave: silence.
    I desperately, desperately want the chance to see this in 3D; I may have to go up to Seattle and the Pacific Science Center. Certainly the Olympia Film Society, my usual chance for obscure movies, isn't going to be getting the 3D version. The thing is, the effect Herzog's going for is showing the actual shape of the stone and how it interacts with the paintings, which I am given to understand is quite important. It is thus far about the only 3D film I've heard of where I think 3D is actually vital, given Herzog's stance on the subject. Werner Herzog is one of my favourite directors, because he has a remarkable eye. I can't imagine any other director's showing Lascaux as it deserves to be shown. If I still lived Back Home, I'd be certain to find somewhere showing it. Chances are a little thinner on the ground up here.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    As I recall, the documentary series Storm Chasers premiered after Twister. Cable channels have a long habit of launching documentary series on the backs of popular films. So perhaps, if Twister was inspired by this guy's work, the decision to greenlight his series was inspired by the success of Twister. Which would make this even more meta.
    I have to agree with George on this. I suspect Tornado Alley and Twister were both inspired by lots of real world storm chasing being done by meteorologists and journalists for years and decades prior to either of those cinamatic projects. Heck, even I almost went on a storm chase a couple years before Twister was released.
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    Sucker Punch: I may be rushing to judgement here; maybe it’s because I have experience on the wards myself, but I find the idea behind this movie instinctively repulsive. Take a bunch of young girls (make sure they’re hot, of course) trap them in a mental institution, and then have them escape by using clues found in their own (suspiciously male-oriented) fantasies. Er, how exactly is this supposed to work? To say nothing of the fact that descending further into your own delusions is just about the LAST thing you should do if you want to get out of a loony bin. The sad thing is I’m sure you’ll get some woman vox pop on the news saying how this depicts female empowerment. No. It does not.
    My two best friends are going to go see it together. Possibly with Graham, though his reaction to the commercial was "What the [BAUT inappropriate but relatively tame] word was that?" One of my best friends is also seriously mentally ill, but she thinks it looks entertaining. What she's worried about is that Magical Mentally Ill Person will be the new thing. Personally, I think it looks like the same kind of ridiculous action-fest we've been getting a lot of lately, except it all takes place in a crazy person's head. Maybe a sort of Doctor Parnassus with explosions? I have a feeling it would just make me bored and mad at the same time.
    What may be the only positive review in existence.
    Main gist:
    Has it earned the awful reviews? Absolutely. But I believe that most of what you get out of a movie (or a book, or a comic, or a song) is a reflection of what you brought with you into it. This film will, by nature, reflect in such a way that some people are simply going to HATE it.
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    Chase after the truth like all hell and you'll free yourself, even though you never touch its coat tails. Clarence Darrow
    A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read. Mark Twain

  18. #78
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    So instead of a negative review of the movie, it's a negative review of the audience?
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    Winter in Wartime: A young boy risks everything to save a downed British aviator in Nazi-occupied Holland. Doesn't look like it treads much new ground (it's basically Allo, Allo without the laughs) but the cinematography looks great, and the wartime resistance deserves all the commemoration it can get.
    In Allo, Allo they didn't worry much about betrayal and who to trust, even if it's family, which is the main theme.
    The book and the TV mini-series from the 70s* had a big influence on how Dutch people of my generation see the occupation.
    Not just as a time of oppression, hunger, and violence, but also paranoia.

    The material is now being turned into a musical, a clear indicator that it is still very popular.

    *which were both for teens, the movie is rated 12 yo and up in the Netherlands, in the US it managed to get an R rating.
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    This is just a pet peeve of mine, but the story is set in the Veluwe, the region where the author grew up, which is NOT IN HOLLAND! Dagnabit.

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    Boy I'm getting slaughtered this week. That's the price I pay when I dedicate an entire thread to making snide comments about trailers for movies I know nothing about.

    Still, I'm glad I'm getting more responses.

    And I could raise a hundred little synechdoches people use for countries I've lived in that would peeve the natives off no end. Like calling American southerners "Yanks" or Wales England. And yes, I know we're supposed to call it "The Netherlands" but, well, I think Holland sounds nicer.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

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    Quote Originally Posted by parallaxicality View Post
    And I could raise a hundred little synechdoches people use for countries I've lived in that would peeve the natives off no end. Like calling American southerners "Yanks" or Wales England. And yes, I know we're supposed to call it "The Netherlands" but, well, I think Holland sounds nicer.
    Actually, the Yanks are from the northeast.
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

  22. #82
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    So calling a southerner a Yank must be extra offensive
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    Sucker Punch: ... Take a bunch of young girls (make sure theyíre hot, of course) trap them in a mental institution, and then have them escape by using clues found in their own (suspiciously male-oriented) fantasies. ...

    Oh, now that's just unfair! The director gave a recent interview in which he clearly put this to rest.

    He said that Babydoll's extremely short miniskirt made it possible to see her undies. Realizing this, and not wanting to exploit it for the titillation factor, they made them black instead of white so they wouldn't be so noticeable.
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  24. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ara Pacis View Post
    Actually, the Yanks are from the northeast.
    That's the point. In certain places, "Yank" means "anyone from the US." As you might imagine, it makes Southerners a little twitchy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ara Pacis View Post
    Actually, the Yanks are from the northeast.
    As Gillian has already pointed out, that was the point.

    But it reminds me of the onscreen credit in Sleepy Hollow, which referred to "the town of St Albands in London" - it's not a town, it doesn't have a 'd' in its name, and it's not in London.

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    Looking forward to Apollo 18...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    That's the point. In certain places, "Yank" means "anyone from the US." As you might imagine, it makes Southerners a little twitchy.
    Right, but then it ceases to be a synechdoche.
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

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    Actually, using "Yankee" (a subset of Americans) as name for the whole (all Americans) is exactly one of the uses of synechdoche, the pars pro toto use.

    As is, intentionally, my use of "Americans" in the previous sentence to refer to US'ians. In this case a totum pro parte synechdoche.
    __________________________________________________
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    Okay, I think I'm gonna give up irony for Lent.
    Et tu BAUT? Quantum mutatus ab illo.

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    Sheesh. Double shifts this week. Looks like it’s aneurism time.


    For the week of Friday, 1 April:

    Hop: Russell Brand as the Easter Bunny. And Hugh Laurie as his dad if I’m not mistaken? Anyway, I hate every crease and pore of Russell Brand’s smug, gurning, priggish face, so I’m boycotting this on principle, which is a bit stupid because a) his face isn’t in it and b) it looks like crap anyway. I wonder if it ends with Brand teaching that slob the true meaning of Easter. By being whipped, nailed to a cross, and then stabbed with a spear. That I’d pay to see.

    Source Code: Ah, going back in time to save the woman you love. It never ends well. If Duncan Jones has pulled off what I think he’s capable of, this could be 2011’s Inception. Certainly this movie’s McGuffin opens up some intriguing narrative possibilities. Here’s hoping audiences feel the same way.

    US:

    Insidious: This might be the next horror masterpiece. I wouldn’t know, because that trailer seemed designed to make me hate it as much as possible. Yes, it’s called “Insidious”. Good name. Direct and to the point. You don’t have to tell me over and over that your movie, called “Insidious”, is insidious. That’s kinda already implied. By the fact that it’s called “Insidious”. Indeed, to so blatantly hammer the title, “Insidious”, over the audience’s head somewhat goes against the meaning of the word “insidious”. If someone asked me what the marketers could have done to improve the trailer for “Insidious”, I would have suggested, above many, many, other things (like lengthening the takes, making the characters sympathetic, quieting the bludgeoning sound effects, and giving some concrete idea of what the movie is actually about), they might try making it more insidious.

    Super: Too bad this came out so soon after Kick-***; if it hadn’t, it might have been a nice subversive little dark comedy. Now it just feels like a rehash. From the reviews though, this apparently goes farther down the road to Twisted Town than Kick-*** ever dared. And wow have I entered a parallel universe or is Ellen Page suddenly looking sexy? It’ll be fun to see her go full on psycho for the first time since Hard Candy.

    Trust : A thriller directed by David Schwimmer. Really. And he’s here to tell the kids of America that, despite what they saw in Tron Legacy, not everything on the internet is as it seems. This movie better do a lot more with that story than that trailer is suggesting, because right now it’s looking fairly trite. Catherine Keener, what are you doing?

    Mother’s Day: Ah, 80s schlock horror remakes. We just can’t get enough of them it seems. And this one’s directed by the guy who made Saw II, III and IV. Still, Rebecca de Mornay can do ice queen like no one else, and the lovely Deborah Ann Woll (Jessica from True Blood) is certainly diverting.

    Rubber: This movie is about a sentient car tire named Robert who lusts after a girl in hotpants and can make people’s heads explode. If you can deal with that, you can probably deal with this movie.

    In a Better World: Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film, this movie looks beautiful, and it certainly has its heart in the right place, but I can’t shake the feeling that it’s being a bit sanctimonious; I doubt it intended to suggest that Africans were all just little kids on a playground, but that’s pretty much what it’s saying.

    Cat Run: There is absolutely nothing positive I can say about this trailer, so I’m not going to bother. Well, OK. Paz Vega is hot. Janet McTeer, it’s been a long time since your Oscar nom.

    The Last Godfather: Uh, what the hell did I just watch? Was that Harvey Keitel? Really? Doesn’t he have better ways to earn paychecks? And Jason Mewes? Seriously? Can’t Kevin Smith keep him in reefer? Apparently that diminutive moron you saw doing the un-stunts is the writer, director and star of this movie. And he’s very big in Korea. I guess Chen Wook Park just isn’t cool enough, huh?

    Queen to Play: What is it with English-speaking actors making French movies? Don’t they know French people hate them? I have to say, Kevin Kline plays a Frenchman amazingly well; so well in fact that I had to check that I had the right trailer. The aged-master-instructs-willing-idealistic-novice plot is not new, but the very French undercurrents of bitterness and yearning make this far more intriguing than others of its type.

    Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead: That’s it. I’m going on a diet. If this guy can get his act together, surely I can too?

    Wrecked: Interesting idea; is a murderer still guilty of his crimes if he loses his memory? Adrien Brody appears to like this action star gig; this trailer borrows a lot from First Blood. Not enough info for a clear judgement as yet.

    Another Harvest Moon: Is it some kind of cruel joke that Hollywood takes a troupe of actors from the early 70s (Cybil Shepard, Ernest Borgnine, Piper Laurie) and places them in a movie about assisted suicide? Is there some kind of message there? The presence of Buffy’s gorgeous Amber Benson notwithstanding, this is no Sea Inside.

    To Catch A Dollar: Documentary about Mohammed Yunus, the Nobel Prizewinning creator of microfinance, one of the few ideas in the last few years that has actually made a difference to the world. Yes, I know, clouds have gathered over it since then, but let’s just have some optimism for a change, shall we?

    Between Notes : Sweet, quite literate indie romance, ala Before Sunrise. I actually think, against all my cynical judgement, that this could be good.

    Wretches & Jabberers: Nice that someone’s finally made a crusading documentary humanising autistic people. Not sure why it had to be called Wretches and Jabberers.

    UK:

    Blooded: The title refers to the fox hunter's practise of smearing the blood of his first dead fox on his cheeks, which would be less awkward if the hunting party were wearing feathers and loincloths instead of felt hats and jodhpurs. As to the trailer, well I doubt it’s a true story, and, however it may serve the horror of the narrative to strip people down before they’re hunted in the wilderness, I’m pretty sure the chance to show hot chicks in their undies had more to do with it than instilling a sense of vulnerability.
    [Long and tedious rant about the stupidity of the British fox hunting debate deleted]

    Essential Killing: I think I posted this in “Films of 2010”, but I thought I’d post it again, because it does look interesting. Basically a wilderness chase film for the Guantanamo Bay generation. Not much else can be gleaned from the trailer, except that it looks very well shot.

    Game: I love these Bollywood trailers; they’re so slick and yet so cheesy at the same time. Not exactly sure what it’s about, but it looks like a cross between The Most Dangerous Game and Clue.

    Killing Bono: I know quite a few people for whom the title would be an invitation. This movie about the Dublin band that lost out to U2 will now always be known as Pete Postlethwaite’s last. He certainly looks like he’s having fun.

    Louise-Michel: Comedy about a disgruntled employee who uses her severance pay to hire a hitman to whack her boss. Not sure what she hopes to gain from said action, but never mind. Looks sporadically funny.

    Oranges and Sunshine: As regular readers of this thread will know, I admit to crushes on many actresses, but to date I have only fallen in love with one once, and that was Emily Watson. I was living in Massachusetts when Breaking the Waves came out, but upon emerging from the theatre I was prepared to swim the Atlantic and propose marriage. But she was already married, so that scuppered it. She’s had an uneven career since then, openly stating she’d rather be at home with the kids then earning more Oscar nominations, which is fair enough I suppose. She’s taken on a number of activist roles recently, seemingly more interested in the message she gets out then in any critical or commercial success. This one, by Jim Loach (Ken’s son) concerns a woman who exposed the deportation of supposedly orphaned British children to gulag-style care homes in Australia. Could be good but the trailer makes it seem like a well-meaning but overly earnest documentary.

    Passenger Side: very indie male bonding road trip flick. Script has some wit in it, I have to say.

    Young Hearts Run Free: Sweet looking indie flick that bears a strong resemblance to Ricky Gervais’s Cemetery Junction, only more realistic and heartfelt.
    Last edited by parallaxicality; 2011-Mar-29 at 09:34 AM.
    "Occam" is the name of the alien race that will enslave us all eventually. And they've got razors for hands. I don't know if that's true but it seems like the simplest answer."

    Stephen Colbert.

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