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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1711
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    Could a super-Earth literally blasted by its sun have an atmosphere?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.03115
    [Submitted on 6 Jul 2020]
    Arid or Cloudy: Characterizing the Atmosphere of the super-Earth 55 Cancri e using High-Resolution Spectroscopy
    A. Jindal, E. J. W. de Mooij, R. Jayawardhana, E. K. Deibert, M. Brogi, Z. Rustamkulov, J. J. Fortney, C. E. Hood, C. V. Morley
    The nearby super-Earth 55 Cnc e orbits a bright (V = 5.95 mag) star with a period of ~ 18 hours and a mass of ~ 8 Earth masses. Its atmosphere may be water-rich and have a large scale-height, though attempts to characterize it have yielded ambiguous results. Here we present a sensitive search for water and TiO in its atmosphere at high spectral resolution using the Gemini North telescope and the GRACES spectrograph. We combine observations with previous observations from Subaru and CFHT, improving the constraints on the presence of water vapor. We adopt parametric models with an updated planet radius based on recent measurements, and use a cross-correlation technique to maximize sensitivity. Our results are consistent with atmospheres that are cloudy or contain minimal amounts of water and TiO. Using these parametric models, we rule out a water-rich atmosphere (VMR >= 0.1%) with a mean molecular weight of <= 15 g/mol at a 3 sigma confidence level, improving on the previous limit by a significant margin. For TiO, we rule out a mean molecular weight of <= 5 g/mol with a 3 sigma confidence level for a VMR greater than 10^-8; for a VMR of greater than 10^-7, the limit rises to a mean molecular weight of <= 10 g/mol. We can rule out low mean-molecular-weight chemical equilibrium models both including and excluding TiO/VO at very high confidence levels (> 10 sigma). Overall, our results are consistent with an atmosphere with a high mean molecular weight and/or clouds, or no atmosphere.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  2. #1712
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    Today's new astronomy word: BLANET. It's a black-hole planet.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.15198

    Formation of "Blanets" from Dust Grains around the Supermassive Black Holes in Galaxies

    Keiichi Wada, Yusuke Tsukamoto, Eiichiro Kokubo

    In Wada, Tsukamoto, and Kokubo (2019), we proposed for the first time that a new class of planets, "blanets" (i.e., black hole planets), can be formed around supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in the galactic center. Here, we investigate the dust coagulation processes and physical conditions of the blanet formation outside the snowline (r snow ∼ several parsecs) in more detail, especially considering the effect of the radial advection of the dust aggregates.

    "Black hole sun, woncha come..."
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  3. #1713
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    The super-Earth around Lalande 21185, a very close star to the Sun, has been confirmed.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2010.00474

    The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Three temperate to warm super-Earths

    S. Stock, E. Nagel, J. Kemmer, V. M. Passegger, S. Reffert, A. Quirrenbach, J. A. Caballero, S. Czesla, V. J. S. Béjar, C. Cardona, E. Díez-Alonso, E. Herrero, S. Lalitha, M. Schlecker, L. Tal-Or, E. Rodríguez, C. Rodríguez-López, I. Ribas, A. Reiners, P. J. Amado, F. F. Bauer, P. Bluhm, M. Cortés-Contreras, L. González-Cuesta, S. Dreizler, A. P. Hatzes, Th. Henning, S. V. Jeffers, A. Kaminski, M. Kürster, M. Lafarga, M. J. López-González, D. Montes, J. C. Morales, S. Pedraz, P. Schöfer, A. Schweitzer, T. Trifonov, M. R. Zapatero Osorio, M. Zechmeister

    We announce the discovery of two planets orbiting the M dwarfs GJ 251 and HD 238090... based on CARMENES radial velocity (RV) data. In addition, we independently confirm with CARMENES data the existence of Lalande 21185 b, a planet that has recently been discovered with the SOPHIE spectrograph. All three planets belong to the class of warm or temperate super-Earths and share similar properties.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  4. #1714
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    Lava planets and magma oceans are a big thing lately. Here are two papers on those topics.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/2010.14101

    Modelling the atmosphere of lava planet K2-141b: implications for low and high resolution spectroscopy

    T. Giang Nguyen, Nicolas B. Cowan, Agnibha Banerjee, John E. Moores

    Transit searches have uncovered Earth-size planets orbiting so close to their host star that their surface should be molten, so-called lava planets. We present idealized simulations of the atmosphere of lava planet K2-141b and calculate the return flow of material via circulation in the magma ocean. We then compare how pure Na, SiO, or SiO2 atmospheres would impact future observations. The more volatile Na atmosphere is thickest followed by SiO and SiO2, as expected. Despite its low vapour pressure, we find that a SiO2 atmosphere is easier to observe via transit spectroscopy due to its greater scale height near the day-night terminator and the planetary radial velocity and acceleration are very high, facilitating high dispersion spectroscopy. The special geometry that arises from very small orbits allows for a wide range of limb observations for K2-141b. After determining the magma ocean depth, we infer that the ocean circulation required for SiO steady-state flow is only 10^4 m/s while the equivalent return flow for Na is several orders of magnitude greater. This suggests that a steady-state Na atmosphere cannot be sustained and that the surface will evolve over time.

    =====

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2010.06433

    Exploring Super-Earth Surfaces: Albedo of Near-Airless Magma Ocean Planets and Topography

    Darius Modirrousta-Galian, Yuichi Ito, Giuseppina Micela

    In this paper we propose an analytic function for the spherical albedo values of airless and near-airless magma ocean planets (AMOPs). We generated 2-D fractal surfaces with varying compositions onto which we individually threw 10,000 light rays. Using an approximate form of the Fresnel equations we measured how much of the incident light was reflected. Having repeated this algorithm on varying surface roughnesses we find the spherical albedo as a function of the Hurst exponent, the geochemical composition of the magma, and the wavelength. As a proof of concept, we used our model on Kepler-10b to demonstrate the applicability of our approach. We present the spherical albedo values produced from different lava compositions and multiple tests that can be applied to observational data in order to determine their characteristics. Currently, there is a strong degeneracy in the surface composition of AMOPs due to the large uncertainties in their measured spherical albedos. In spite of this, when applied to Kepler-0b we show that its high albedo could be caused by a moderately wavy ocean that is rich in oxidised metallic species such as FeO, Fe2O3, Fe3O4. This would imply that Kepler-10b is a coreless or near-coreless body.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  5. #1715
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    Great paper title! Fascinating topic.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.08530

    In search of the weirdest galaxies in the Universe

    Job Formsma, Teymoor Saifollahi

    Weird galaxies are outliers that have either unknown or very uncommon features making them different from the normal sample. These galaxies are very interesting as they may provide new insights into current theories, or can be used to form new theories about processes in the Universe. Interesting outliers are often found by accident, but this will become increasingly more difficult with future big surveys generating an enormous amount of data. This gives the need for machine learning detection techniques to find the interesting weird objects. In this work, we inspect the galaxy spectra of the third data release of the Galaxy And Mass Assembly survey and look for the weird outlying galaxies using two different outlier detection techniques. First, we apply distance-based Unsupervised Random Forest on the galaxy spectra using the flux values as input features. Spectra with a high outlier score are inspected and divided into different categories such as blends, quasi-stellar objects, and BPT outliers. We also experiment with a reconstruction-based outlier detection method using a variational autoencoder and compare the results of the two different methods. At last, we apply dimensionality reduction techniques on the output of the methods to inspect the clustering of similar spectra. We find that both unsupervised methods extract important features from the data and can be used to find many different types of outliers.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  6. #1716
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    Title says it all. Black dwarfs? Also, 10^11000 years is a long time to wait.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/2008.02296

    Black Dwarf Supernova in the Far Future

    M. E. Caplan

    In the far future long after star formation has ceased the universe will be populated by sparse degenerate remnants, mostly white dwarfs, though their ultimate fate is an open question. These white dwarfs will cool and freeze solid into black dwarfs while pycnonuclear fusion will slowly process their composition to iron-56. However, due to the declining electron fraction the Chandrasekhar limit of these stars will be decreasing and will eventually be below that of the most massive black dwarfs. As such, isolated dwarf stars with masses greater than ∼1.2 M⊙ will collapse in the far future due to the slow accumulation of iron-56 in their cores. If proton decay does not occur then this is the ultimate fate of about 10^21 stars, approximately one percent of all stars in the observable universe. We present calculations of the internal structure of black dwarfs with iron cores as a model for progenitors. From pycnonuclear fusion rates we estimate their lifetime and thus delay time to be 10^1100 years. We speculate that high mass black dwarf supernovae resemble accretion induced collapse of O/Ne/Mg white dwarfs while later low mass transients will be similar to stripped-envelope core-collapse supernova, and may be the last interesting astrophysical transients to occur prior to heat death.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  7. #1717
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    W0855 is a Y-type brown dwarf (almost a free-floating planet) barely farther than Alpha Centauri. Trying to observe it, however, is tough.


    https://arxiv.org/abs/2009.05414

    A search for millimeter emission from the coldest and closest brown dwarf with ALMA

    Dirk Petry, Valentin D. Ivanov

    Context: WISE J085510.83-071442.5 (W0855) is a unique object: with Teff ca. 250 K, it is the coldest known brown dwarf (BD), located at only ca.2.2 pc form the Sun. It is extremely faint, which makes any astronomical observations difficult. However, at least one remotely similar ultra-low-mass object, the M9 dwarf TVLM 513-46546, has been shown to be a steady radio emitter at frequencies up to 95 GHz with superimposed active states where strong, pulsed emission is observed. Aims: Our goal is to determine the millimeter radio properties of W0855 with deep observations around 93 GHz (3.2 mm) in order to investigate whether radio astrometry of this object is feasible and to measure or set an upper limit on its magnetic field. Methods: We observed W0855 for 94 min at 85.1-100.9 GHz on 24 December 2019 using 44 of the Atacama Large millimeter Array (ALMA) 12 m antennas. We used the standard ALMA calibration procedure and created the final image for our analysis by accommodating the Quasar 3C 209, the brightest nearby object by far. Furthermore, we created a light curve with a 30 s time resolution to search for pulsed emission. Results: Our observations achieve a noise RMS of 7.3 {\mu}Jy/beam for steady emission and of 88 {\mu}Jy for 30 s pulses in the aggregated bandwidth (Stokes I). There is no evidence for steady or pulsed emission from the object at the time of the observation. We derive 3 {\sigma} upper limits of 21.9 {\mu}Jy on the steady emission and of 264 {\mu}Jy on the pulsed emission of W0855 between 85 GHz and 101 GHz. Conclusions: Together with the recent non-detection of W0855 at 4-8 GHz, our constraints on the steady and pulsed emission from W0855 confirm that the object is neither radio-loud nor magnetospherically particularly active.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  8. #1718
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    New paper suggests that a giant comet broke apart 20,000 years ago, and its remnant comets and meteors threaten us today.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2011.13078

    Taurid Complex Smoking Gun: Detection of Cometary Activity

    Ignacio Ferrin, Vincenzo Orofino

    Using the Secular Light Curve (SLC) formalism (Ferrín, 2010), we have catalogued 88 probable members of the Taurid Complex (TC). 51 of them have useful SLCs and 34 of these (67%) exhibit cometary activity. This high percentage of active asteroids gives support to the hypothesis of a catastrophe that took place during the Upper Paleolithic (Clube and Napier, 1984), when a large short-period comet, arriving in the inner Solar System from the Kuiper Belt, experienced, starting from 20 thousand years ago, a series of fragmentations that produced the present 2P/Encke comet, together with a large number of other members of the TC. The fragmentation of the progenitor body was facilitated by its heterogeneous structure (very similar to a rubble pile) and this also explains the current coexistence in the complex of fragments of different composition and origin. We have found that (2212) Hephaistos and 169P/NEAT are active and members of the TC with their own sub-group. Other components of the complex are groups of meteoroids, that often give rise to meteor showers when they enter the terrestrial atmosphere, and very probably also the two small asteroids that in 1908 and 2013 exploded in the terrestrial atmosphere over Tunguska and Chelyabinsk, respectively. What we see today of the TC are the remnants of a very varied and numerous complex of objects, characterized by an intense past of collisions with the Earth which may continue to represent a danger for our planet.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  9. #1719
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    A slow giant impact on the Moon's nearside would explain a lot about the differences between nearside and farside. My question is, did Earth intercept and throw the impactor at the nearside?


    https://arxiv.org/abs/2011.13686

    Are the Moon's nearside-farside asymmetries the result of a giant impact?

    Meng-Hua Zhu, Kai Wunnemann, Ross W. K. Potter, Thorsten Kleine, Alessandro Morbidelli

    The Moon exhibits striking geological asymmetries in elevation, crustal thickness, and composition between its nearside and farside. Although several scenarios have been proposed to explain these asymmetries, their origin remains debated. Recent remote sensing observations suggest that (1) the crust on the farside highlands consists of two layers: a primary anorthositic layer with thickness of ~30-50 km and on top a more mafic-rich layer ~10 km thick; and (2) the nearside exhibits a large area of low-Ca pyroxene that has been interpreted to have an impact origin. These observations support the idea that the lunar nearside-farside asymmetries may be the result of a giant impact. Here, using quantitative numerical modeling, we test the hypothesis that a giant impact on the early Moon can explain the striking differences in elevation, crustal thickness, and composition between the nearside and farside of the Moon. We find that a large impactor, impacting the current nearside with a low velocity, can form a mega-basin and reproduce the characteristics of the crustal asymmetry and structures comparable to those observed on the current Moon, including the nearside lowlands and the farside's mafic-rich layer on top of a primordial anorthositic crust. Our model shows that the excavated deep-seated KREEP (potassium, rare-earth elements, and phosphorus) material, deposited close to the basin rim, slumps back into the basin and covers the entire basin floor; subsequent large impacts can transport the shallow KREEP material to the surface, resulting in its observed distribution. In addition, our model suggests that prior to the asymmetry-forming impact, the Moon may have had an 182W anomaly compared to the immediate post-giant impact Earth's mantle, as predicted if the Moon was created through a giant collision with the proto-Earth.

    QUOTE: We demonstrate that a large body slowly impacting the nearside of the Moon can reproduce the observed crustal thickness asymmetryand form both the farside highlands andthe nearside lowlands. Additionally, the model shows that the resulting impact ejecta would cover the primordial anorthositic crust to form a two-layer crust on the farside, as observed. Overall, the modeling resultsare generally in agreement with assumptions that are based observations and provide credible explanations for the observed asymmetries in crustal thickness and elevation. This work also provides a plausible explanation for the existence of KREEP (potassium, rare-earth element, and phosphorus) on the lunar surface. Avery important implication of this work is that it can explain the conundrum about isotopic differences between the Earth and Moon, particularly the significant anomaly of 182W in the Moon, as this anomaly would occur if this giant impact added material to the Moon after the initial Moon-forming. Our model can thus explain this isotope anomaly in the context of the giant impact scenario of the Moon’s origin. In summary, this work quantitatively supportsthe long-standing hypothesis that a giant impact resulted in the Moon’s nearside-farside asymmetriesand the Procellarum KREEP terrain was formed as a consequence of such an impact event. In addition, this work also provides a reference for reconstructing the early history of planetary bodies with similar asymmetries, such as Mars.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  10. #1720
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    A paper suggesting that the Oort Cloud contains more interstellar objects than solar-system-born ones. Comet Borisov seems to have been the main indicator.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2011.14900

    Interstellar Objects Outnumber Solar System Objects in the Oort Cloud

    Amir Siraj, Abraham Loeb

    Here, we show that the detection of Borisov implies that interstellar objects outnumber Solar system objects in the Oort cloud, whereas the reverse is true near the Sun due to the stronger gravitational focusing of bound objects. This hypothesis can be tested with stellar occultation surveys of the Oort cloud. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ∼1% of carbon and oxygen in the Milky Way Galaxy may be locked in interstellar objects, saturating the heavy element budget of the minimum mass Solar nebula model.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  11. #1721
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    Supergiant stars about to become core-collapse supernova can be detected and monitored.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1910.03797

    Predicting the next local supernova

    John Middleditch (University of California, retired)

    Core collapse within blue supergiant stars, as occurred within Sk -69∘202/Supernova 1987A, is generally attributed to a merger of two electron-degenerate cores within a common envelope, with a merged mass in excess of 1.4 solar. Supernova 1987A also had two associated bright sources, one with about 8% of the H-alpha flux, and 74 milli-arc seconds distant by day 50, and another, four times fainter and 160 milli-arc seconds away in the opposite direction on day 38. Using recent advances in our understanding of pulsars, we can show that the second source was the result of the core-merger process, which can drive a relativistic jet of particles prior to the completion of the merger process, whether this proceeds to core collapse, or not. As with those resulting from core-collapse, such beams and jets are likely to produce an obvious spectral signature (e.g., even in un-red/blue-shifted H-alpha), which can be detected in nearby galaxies. There is very likely a time interval of a few months, during which such supergiant stars, a high fraction of which will eventually undergo core collapse, can be identified. These can be carefully followed observationally to maximize the chance of observing core collapses as they happen. Such studies may eventually help in using such objects as standard candles.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  12. #1722
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    A paper suggesting that the Oort Cloud contains more interstellar objects than solar-system-born ones. Comet Borisov seems to have been the main indicator.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2011.14900

    Interstellar Objects Outnumber Solar System Objects in the Oort Cloud
    I saw this the other day and I was going to post it here until you beat me to it !

    Actually I was going to post it under Space Exploration, because what does 10^14 comet-like bodies per cubic parsec of space mean for interstellar travel?

  13. #1723
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    Quote Originally Posted by kzb View Post
    I saw this the other day and I was going to post it here until you beat me to it !

    Actually I was going to post it under Space Exploration, because what does 10^14 comet-like bodies per cubic parsec of space mean for interstellar travel?
    Head-on collisions? Bound to happen with debris and dust particles too.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  14. #1724
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    Quote Originally Posted by kzb View Post
    I saw this the other day and I was going to post it here until you beat me to it !

    Actually I was going to post it under Space Exploration, because what does 10^14 comet-like bodies per cubic parsec of space mean for interstellar travel?
    A cubic parsec is about 3x10^49 cubic meters, so 10^14 objects in that volume gives an average distance between them of about 3x10^11 meters.

  15. #1725
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    A cubic parsec is about 3x10^49 cubic meters, so 10^14 objects in that volume gives an average distance between them of about 3x10^11 meters.
    Yeah I've now worked out a 100 metre wide space ship would have about 1 in 10^16 chance of collision per parsec travelled.

    There is a probability of 1 that you would pass within about half a million km of an object per parsec travelled. I don't know if people would find that stressful or not, at 10% light speed you probably don't have long to calculate if you are going to collide or not, after detecting a 1km object somewhere up ahead.

  16. #1726
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Head-on collisions? Bound to happen with debris and dust particles too.
    Yes that is what I was thinking, but it turns out the risk is rather small (certainly for the comet-like bodies).

    The other side of the coin is that you are never very far from water in interstellar space. Swampyankee calculates an average separation of 300 million km between these bodies. If high-speed interstellar travel remains forever just a fantasy, this confirms there is the alternative method of gradual spread by island hopping. Putting further pressure on the Fermi paradox ?

  17. #1727
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    But can you detect those mountain sized icebergs trillions of kilometers from the nearest star?
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  18. #1728
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    My favorite exoplanet, 55 Cancri e, is so hot and close to its star that it has no atmosphere.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.02198

    No escaping helium from 55 Cnc e

    Michael Zhang, Heather A. Knutson, Lile Wang, Fei Dai, Antonija Oklopcic, Renyu Hu

    We search for escaping helium from the hot super Earth 55 Cnc e by taking high-resolution spectra of the 1083 nm line during two transits using Keck/NIRSPEC. We detect no helium absorption down to a 90% upper limit of 250 ppm in excess absorption or 0.27 milli-Angstrom in equivalent width. This corresponds to a mass loss rate of less than ∼109 g/s, although the precise constraint is heavily dependent on model assumptions. This rate is notably below that predicted by both the 1D hydrodynamical simulations of Salz et al 2016 and our own 2.5D models, even for implausibly thin hydrogen/helium atmospheres with surface pressures of less than 100 microbar. We consider both hydrogen- and helium-dominated atmospheric compositions, and find similar bounds on the mass loss rate in both scenarios. Together with the non-detection of Lyman α absorption by Ehrenreich et al 2012, our helium non-detection indicates that 55 Cnc e either never accreted a primordial atmosphere in the first place, or lost its primordial atmosphere shortly after the dissipation of the gas disk.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  19. #1729
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    We've found super-Earths, and now we have sub-Earths, planets smaller than Earth.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.02273

    A Distinct Population of Small Planets: Sub-Earths

    Yansong Qian (Toronto), Yanqin Wu (Toronto)

    There is a well-known gap in the sizes of small planets, between super-Earths and mini-Neptunes. This is explained by the envelope stripping of mini-Neptunes at short orbits. Here, we report the presence of another gap at a smaller size (around one Earth radius). By focussing on planets orbiting around GK-dwarfs inward of 16 days, and correcting for observational completeness, we find that the number of super-Earths maximize around 1.4 Earth radii and disappear shortly below this size. Instead, a new population of planets (sub-Earths) appear to dominate at sizes below ~ 1 Earth radius. This pattern is also observed in ultra-short-period planets. The end of super-Earths supports earlier claims that super-Earths and mini-Neptunes, planets that likely form in gaseous proto-planetary disks, have a narrow mass distribution. The sub-Earths, in contrast, can be described by a power-law mass distribution and may be explained by the theory of terrestrial planet formation. We therefore speculate that they are formed well after the gaseous disks have dissipated. The extension of these sub-Earths towards longer orbital periods, currently invisible, may be the true terrestrial analogues. This strongly motivates new searches.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  20. #1730
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    We've found super-Earths, and now we have sub-Earths, planets smaller than Earth.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.02273

    A Distinct Population of Small Planets: Sub-Earths
    This is an interesting idea, that a population of stripped-core planets peaking at 1.4 Earth masses is superimposed on the underlying population of truly terrestrial planets.

    In the plots, I can see the dip in frequency centred on 2.0 Earth masses, but the reported dip in frequency centred on 1.0 Earth masses -I don't perceive it. The terrestrial planet frequency looks pretty flat until it is overlain by the stripped cores peak ?

  21. #1731
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    While some are searching for Planet Nine, other astronomers find a more massive exoplanet on a similar-to-Planet-Nine orbit in another complicated solar system.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.04712

    First detection of orbital motion for HD 106906 b: A wide-separation exoplanet on a Planet Nine-like orbit

    Meiji M. Nguyen, Robert J. De Rosa, Paul Kalas

    HD 106906 is a 15 Myr old short-period (49 days) spectroscopic binary that hosts a wide-separation (737 au) planetary-mass (∼11 MJup) common proper motion companion, HD 106906 b. Additionally, a circumbinary debris disk is resolved at optical and near-infrared wavelengths that exhibits a significant asymmetry at wide separations that may be driven by gravitational perturbations from the planet. In this study we present the first detection of orbital motion of HD 106906 b using Hubble Space Telescope images spanning a 14 yr period. We achieve high astrometric precision by cross-registering the locations of background stars with the Gaia astrometric catalog, providing the subpixel location of HD 106906 that is either saturated or obscured by coronagraphic optical elements. We measure a statistically significant 31.8 ±7.0 mas eastward motion of the planet between the two most constraining measurements taken in 2004 and 2017. This motion enables a measurement of the inclination between the orbit of the planet and the inner debris disk of either 36 +27−14 deg or 44 +27−14 deg, depending on the true orientation of the orbit of the planet. There is a strong negative correlation between periastron and mutual inclination; orbits with smaller periastra are more misaligned with the disk plane. With a periastron of 510 +480−320 au, HD 106906 b is likely detached from the planetary region within 100 au radius, showing that a Planet Nine-like architecture can be established very early in the evolution of a planetary system.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Dec-10 at 02:36 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  22. #1732
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    We've found super-Earths, and now we have sub-Earths, planets smaller than Earth.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.02273

    A Distinct Population of Small Planets: Sub-Earths.
    More detailed information on the Sub-Earths and other sorts of exoplanets we don't hear much about.

    https://www.universetoday.com/149193...ne-sub-earths/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  23. #1733
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    While some are searching for Planet Nine, other astronomers find a more massive exoplanet on a similar-to-Planet-Nine orbit in another complicated solar system.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.04712

    First detection of orbital motion for HD 106906 b: A wide-separation exoplanet on a Planet Nine-like orbit.
    More information on this unusual exoplanet.

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard...ar-flung-orbit
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  24. #1734
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    More information on this unusual exoplanet.

    https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard...ar-flung-orbit
    TBH, it isn't much like Planet 9. The system has a double star at its centre, and the theory is, this large planet was flung out into a wide orbit due to interaction with the double star.

    We don't have a double star, so they have to think of another reason for Planet 9 being flung out.

  25. #1735
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    Is it in a circular orbit? How do you go from flinging into an eccentric orbit to a circular one?
    SHARKS (crossed out) MONGEESE (sic) WITH FRICKIN' LASER BEAMS ATTACHED TO THEIR HEADS

  26. #1736
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Mazanec View Post
    Is it in a circular orbit? How do you go from flinging into an eccentric orbit to a circular one?
    Best fit eccentricity = 0.44, plus the orbit is inclined 56 degrees to the plane of the debris disk. Quite a big uncertainty on the eccentricity, but it is far from circular.

    The paper says the planet interacted with a passing star in order to put it into its bound orbit.

  27. #1737
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    Fun Papers In Arxiv

    I saw the popular science stories and
    My first thought was how was this planet even discovered? At 700+ AU it would seem to be too far away to see a reduction in light curves from either star, or detecting stellar wobble.

    ETA: Ah ha. Answer: Direct imaging resulting from study of the debris disk on this young binary.
    Last edited by schlaugh; 2020-Dec-13 at 06:47 PM.

  28. #1738
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    Everything (?) you want to know about lava worlds and magma oceans on exoplanets.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.07337

    Lava Worlds: From Early Earth to Exoplanets

    Keng-Hsien Chao, Rebecca deGraffenried, Mackenzie Lach, William Nelson, Kelly Truax, Eric Gaidos

    The magma ocean concept was first conceived to explain the geology of the Moon, but hemispherical or global oceans of silicate melt could be a widespread "lava world" phase of rocky planet accretion, and could persist on planets on short-period orbits around other stars. The formation and crystallization of magma oceans could be a defining stage in the assembly of a core, origin of a crust, initiation of tectonics, and formation of an atmosphere. The last decade has seen significant advances in our understanding of this phenomenon through analysis of terrestrial and extraterrestrial samples, planetary missions, and astronomical observations of exoplanets. This review describes the energetic basis of magma oceans and lava worlds and the lava lake analogs available for study on Earth and Io. It provides an overview of evidence for magma oceans throughout the Solar System and considers the factors that control the rocks these magma oceans leave behind. It describes research on theoretical and observed exoplanets that could host extant magma oceans and summarizes efforts to detect and characterize them. It reviews modeling of the evolution of magma oceans as a result of crystallization and evaporation, the interaction with the underlying solid mantle, and the effects of planetary rotation. The review also considers theoretical investigations on the formation of an atmosphere in concert with the magma ocean and in response to irradiation from the host star, and possible end-states. Finally, it describes needs and gaps in our knowledge and points to future opportunities with new planetary missions and space telescopes to identify and better characterize lava worlds around nearby stars.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  29. #1739
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    If we could use the Sun as the gravitational lens for a super-mega-telescope... wow.

    https://www.universetoday.com/149214...uld-look-like/

    Original paper: Image recovery with the solar gravitational lens
    (well illustrated)
    https://arxiv.org/pdf/2012.05477.pdf
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  30. #1740
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    Could dark matter collect at Earth's core and turn into a planet-eating black hole, destroying us all? This paper seems to say "yes". I mean, "probably not".

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2012.09176

    Dark Matter, Destroyer of Worlds: Neutrino, Thermal, and Existential Signatures from Black Holes in the Sun and Earth

    Javier F. Acevedo, Joseph Bramante, Alan Goodman, Joachim Kopp, Toby Opferkuch

    Dark matter can be captured by celestial objects and accumulate at their centers, forming a core of dark matter that can collapse to a small black hole, provided that the annihilation rate is small or zero. If the nascent black hole is big enough, it will grow to consume the star or planet. We calculate the rate of dark matter accumulation in the Sun and Earth, and use their continued existence to place novel constraints on high mass asymmetric dark matter interactions. We also identify and detail less destructive signatures: a newly-formed black hole can be small enough to evaporate via Hawking radiation, resulting in an anomalous heat flow emanating from Earth, or in a flux of high-energy neutrinos from the Sun observable at IceCube. The latter signature is entirely new, and we find that it may cover large regions of parameter space that are not probed by any other method.

    QUOTE: It is gratifying to note that the dark matter–nucleus interaction parameter space for which a small black hole would be growing inside the Earth at present can be ruled out by underground searches for dark matter and the continued survival of the Sun.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Dec-18 at 12:47 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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