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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1681
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    Earth-sized planets about half a billion years old might not be Magma Ocean worlds anymore, but they might have "mushy mantles" under the hot rocks.

    https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/20...1165M/abstract
    https://academic.oup.com/gji/article...dFrom=fulltext
    A mushy Earth's mantle for more than 500 Myr after the magma ocean solidification
    J Monteux, D Andrault, M Guitreau, H Samuel, S Demouchy
    Geophysical Journal International, Volume 221, Issue 2, May 2020, Pages 1165–1181
    In its early evolution, the Earth mantle likely experienced several episodes of complete melting enhanced by giant impact heating, short-lived radionuclides heating and viscous dissipation during the metal/silicate separation. After a first stage of rapid and significant crystallization (Magma Ocean stage), the mantle cooling is slowed down due to the rheological transition, which occurs at a critical melt fraction of 40–50%. This transition first occurs in the lowermost mantle, before the mushy zone migrates toward the Earth's surface with further mantle cooling. Thick thermal boundary layers form above and below this reservoir. We have developed numerical models to monitor the thermal evolution of a cooling and crystallizing deep mushy mantle. For this purpose, we use a 1-D approach in spherical geometry accounting for turbulent convective heat transfer and integrating recent and solid experimental constraints from mineral physics. Our results show that the last stages of the mushy mantle solidification occur in two separate mantle layers. The lifetime and depth of each layer are strongly dependent on the considered viscosity model and in particular on the viscosity contrast between the solid upper and lower mantle. In any case, the full solidification should occur at the Hadean–Eoarchean boundary 500–800 Myr after Earth's formation. The persistence of molten reservoirs during the Hadean may favor the absence of early reliefs at that time and maintain isolation of the early crust from the underlying mantle dynamics.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  2. #1682
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    If a comet is dangerous to Earth, how dangerous is a GIANT comet? Ginormously bad.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.01870
    The hazard from fragmenting comets
    W.M. Napier
    (Submitted on 4 Apr 2020)
    Comet disintegration proceeds both through sublimation and discrete splitting events. The cross-sectional area of material ejected by a comet may, within days, become many times greater than that of the Earth, making encounters with such debris much more likely than collisions with the nucleus itself. The hierarchic fragmentation and sublimation of a large comet in a short period orbit may yield many hundreds of such short-lived clusters. We model this evolution with a view to assessing the probability of an encounter which might have significant terrestrial effects, through atmospheric dusting or multiple impacts. Such an encounter may have contributed to the large animal extinctions and sudden climatic cooling of 12,900 years ago, and the near-simultaneous collapse of civilisations around 2350 BC.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  3. #1683
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    "Predicting the next supernova" - find an overlarge blue supergiant.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1910.03797
    Predicting the next local supernova
    John Middleditch (University of California, retired)
    (Submitted on 9 Oct 2019 (v1), last revised 6 Apr 2020 (this version, v4))
    Core collapse within blue supergiant stars, as occurred within Sk-69∘202/Supernova 1987A, is generally attributed to a merger of two electron-degenerate cores within a common envelope, with a merged mass in excess of 1.4 solar. Supernova 1987A also had two associated bright sources, one with about 8% of the H-alpha flux, and 74 milli-arc seconds distant by day 50, and another, four times fainter and 160 milli-arc seconds away in the opposite direction on day 30. Using recent advances in our understanding of pulsars, we can show that the second source was the result of the core-merger process, which can drive a relativistic jet of particles prior to the completion of the merger process, whether this proceeds to core collapse, or not. As with those resulting from core-collapse, such beams and jets are likely to produce an obvious spectral signature (e.g., even in un-red/blue-shifted H-alpha), which can be detected in nearby galaxies. There is very likely a time interval of a few months, during which such supergiant stars, a high fraction of which will eventually undergo core collapse, can be identified. These can be carefully followed observationally to maximize the chance of observing core collapses as they happen. Such studies may eventually help in using such objects as standard candles.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  4. #1684
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    Islands in the Milky Way -- kind of evocative, isn't it? Real, too.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.02054
    Interarm islands in the Milky Way -- the one near the Cygnus spiral arm
    Jacques P Vallée
    (Submitted on 5 Apr 2020)
    This study extends to the structure of the Galaxy. Our main goal is to focus on the first spiral arm beyond the Perseus arm, often called the Cygnus arm or the Outer Norma arm, by appraising the distributions of the masers near the Cygnus arm. The method is to employ masers whose trigonometric distances were measured with accuracy. The maser data come from published literature, having been obtained via the existing networks (US VLBA, the Japanese VERA, the European VLBI, and the Australian LBA). The new results for Cygnus are split in two groups: those located near a recent CO fitted global model spiral arm, and those congregating within an interarm island located halfway between the Perseus arm and the Cygnus arm. Next, we compare this island with other similar interarm objects near other spiral arms. Thus we delineate an interarm island (6 x 2 kpc) located between the two long spiral arms (Cygnus and Perseus arms); this is reminiscent of the small Local Orion arm (4 x 2 kpc) found earlier between the Perseus and Sagittarius arms, and of the old Loop (2 x 0.5 kpc) found earlier between the Sagittarius and Scutum arms. Various arm models are compared, based on observational data (masers, HII regions, HI gas, young stars, CO gas).
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  5. #1685
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    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  6. #1686
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    Might be important to know about this Earthlike planet one day. Just barely found it.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.06725
    A Habitable-Zone Earth-Sized Planet Rescued from False Positive Status
    Andrew Vanderburg, Pamela Rowden, Steve Bryson, Jeffrey Coughlin, Natalie Batalha, Karen A. Collins, David W. Latham, Susan E. Mullally, Knicole D. Colón, Chris Henze, Chelsea X. Huang, Samuel N. Quinn
    (Submitted on 14 Apr 2020)
    We report the discovery of an Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of a low-mass star called Kepler-1649. The planet, Kepler-1649 c, is 1.06 +0.15/−0.10 times the size of Earth and transits its 0.1977 +/- 0.0051 Msun mid M-dwarf host star every 19.5 days. It receives 74 +/- 3 % the incident flux of Earth, giving it an equilibrium temperature of 234 +/- 20K and placing it firmly inside the circumstellar habitable zone. Kepler-1649 also hosts a previously-known inner planet that orbits every 8.7 days and is roughly equivalent to Venus in size and incident flux. Kepler-1649 c was originally classified as a false positive by the Kepler pipeline, but was rescued as part of a systematic visual inspection of all automatically dispositioned Kepler false positives. This discovery highlights the value of human inspection of planet candidates even as automated techniques improve, and hints that terrestrial planets around mid to late M-dwarfs may be more common than those around more massive stars.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  7. #1687
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    (Right place to post.) Polar planets around highly eccentric binaries are the most stable

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.07230
    Cheng Chen, Stephen H. Lubow, Rebecca G. Martin
    (Submitted on 15 Apr 2020)
    We study the orbital stability of a non-zero mass, close-in circular orbit planet around an eccentric orbit binary for various initial values of the binary eccentricity, binary mass fraction, planet mass, planet semi-major axis, and planet inclination by means of numerical simulations that cover 5×10^4 binary orbits. For small binary eccentricity, the stable orbits that extend closest to the binary (most stable orbits) are nearly retrograde and circulating. For high binary eccentricity, the most stable orbits are highly inclined and librate near the so-called generalised polar orbit which is a stationary orbit that is fixed in the frame of the binary orbit. For more extreme mass ratio binaries, there is a greater variation in the size of the stability region (defined by initial orbital radius and inclination) with planet mass and initial inclination, especially for low binary eccentricity. For low binary eccentricity, inclined planet orbits may be unstable even at large orbital radii (separation >5 a). The escape time for an unstable planet is generally shorter around an equal mass binary compared with an unequal mass binary. Our results have implications for circumbinary planet formation and evolution and will be helpful for understanding future circumbinary planet observations.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  8. #1688
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    If you get into mapping out our local end of the Milky Way, you might find this worthwhile.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.07261
    Untangling the Galaxy. II. Structure within 3 kpc
    Marina Kounkel, Kevin Covey, Keivan G. Stassun
    We present the results of the hierarchical clustering analysis of the Gaia DR2 data to search for clusters, co-moving groups, and other stellar structures. The current paper builds on the sample from the previous work, extending it in distance from 1 kpc to 3 kpc, increasing the number of identified structures up to 8292. To aid in the analysis of the population properties, we developed a neural network called Auriga to robustly estimate the age, extinction, and distance of a stellar group based on the input photometry and parallaxes of the individual members. We apply Auriga to derive the properties of not only the structures found in this paper, but also previously identified open clusters. Through this work, we examine the temporal structure of the spiral arms. Specifically, we find that the Sagittarius arm has moved by >500 pc in the last 100 Myr, and the Perseus arm has been experiencing a relative lull in star formation activity over the last 25 Myr. We confirm the findings from the previous paper on the transient nature of the spiral arms, with the timescale of transition of a few 100 Myr. Finally, we find a peculiar ~1 Gyr old stream of stars that appears to be heliocentric. It is unclear what is the origin of it.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  9. #1689
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    Did a giant impact or spin-orbit resonance cause Uranus to tilt at 98∘? How about two giant impacts?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.14913
    Tilting Uranus: Collisions vs. Spin-Orbit Resonance
    Zeeve Rogoszinski, Douglas P. Hamilton
    [Submitted on 30 Apr 2020]
    In this paper we investigate whether Uranus's 98∘ obliquity was a byproduct of a secular spin-orbit resonance assuming that the planet originated closer to the Sun. In this position, Uranus's spin precession frequency is fast enough to resonate with another planet located beyond Saturn. Using numerical integration, we show that resonance capture is possible in a variety of past solar system configurations, but that the timescale required to tilt the planet to 90∘ is of the order ∼10^8 years; a timespan that is uncomfortably long. A resonance kick could tilt the planet to a significant 40∘ in ∼10^7 years if conditions were ideal. We also revisit the collisional hypothesis for the origin of Uranus's large obliquity. We consider multiple impacts with a new collisional code that builds up a planet by summing the angular momentum imparted from impactors. Since gas accretion imparts an unknown but likely large part of the planet's spin angular momentum, we compare different collisional models for tilted, untilted, spinning, and non-spinning planets. We find that two collisions totaling to 1 M⊕ is sufficient to explain the planet's current spin state. Finally, we investigate hybrid models and show that resonances must produce a tilt of ∼40∘ for any noticeable improvements to the collision model.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  10. #1690
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    A fun paper... hmm, well, you have something to argue over with this one, anyway.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.01968
    Is an Infinitely Long Ruler Possible in an Expanding Universe?
    Aaron Glanville, Tamara Davis
    [Submitted on 5 May 2020]
    Does space stretch its contents as the universe expands? Usually we say the answer is no - the stretching of space is not like the stretching of a rubber sheet that might drag things with it. In this paper we explore a potential counter example - namely we show that is is impossible to make an arbitrarily long ruler in an expanding universe, because it is impossible to hold the distant end of the ruler "stationary" with respect to us (as defined in the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker metric). We show that this does not mean that expanding space has a force associated with it, rather, some fictitious forces arise due to our choice of a non-inertial reference frame. By choosing our usual time-slice (where all comoving observers agree on the age of the universe), we choose a global frame in which special relativity does not hold. As a result, simple relativistic velocity transforms generate an apparent acceleration, even where no force exists. This effect is similar to the fictitious forces that arise in describing objects in rotating reference frames, as in the case of the Coriolis effect.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  11. #1691
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    The struggle to understand Type Ia supernovae, particularly unusual ones, continues.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.05972
    The Spectacular Ultraviolet Flash From the Type Ia Supernova 2019yvq
    A. A. Miller, et al.
    [Submitted on 12 May 2020]
    Early observations of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) provide essential clues for understanding the progenitor system that gave rise to the terminal thermonuclear explosion. We present exquisite observations of SN2019yvq, the second observed SNIa, after iPTF14atg, to display an early flash of emission in the ultraviolet (UV) and optical. Our analysis finds that SN2019yvq was unusual, even when ignoring the initial flash, in that it was moderately underluminous for a SNIa (Mg≈−18.5mag at peak) yet featured very high absorption velocities (v≈15,000kms−1 for Si II λ6355 at peak). We find that many of the observational features of SN2019yvq, aside from the flash, can be explained if the explosive yield of radioactive 56Ni is relatively low (we measure M56Ni=0.31±0.05 M⊙) and it and other iron-group elements are concentrated in the innermost layers of the ejecta. To explain both the UV/optical flash and peak properties of SN2019yvq we consider four different models: interaction between the SN ejecta and a nondegenerate companion, extended clumps of 56Ni in the outer ejecta, a double-detonation explosion, and the violent merger of two white dwarfs. Each of these models has shortcomings when compared to the observations; it is clear additional tuning is required to better match SN2019yvq. In closing, we predict that the nebular spectra of SN 2019yvq will feature either H or He emission, if the ejecta collided with a companion, strong [Ca II] emission, if it was a double detonation, or narrow [O I] emission, if it was due to a violent merger.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  12. #1692
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    If zodiacal light interests you, this review paper should be right for you.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.07480
    Zodiacal light observations and its link with cosmic dust: a review
    Jeremie Lasue, Anny-Chantal Levasseur-Regourd, Jean-Baptiste Renard
    [Submitted on 15 May 2020]
    The zodiacal light is a night-glow mostly visible along the plane of the ecliptic. It represents the background radiation associated with solar light scattered by the tenuous flattened interplanetary cloud of dust particles surrounding the Sun and the planets. It is an interesting subject of study, as the source of the micrometeoroids falling on Earth, as a link to the activity of the small bodies of the Solar System, but also as a foreground that veils the low brightness extrasolar astronomical light sources. In this review, we summarize the zodiacal light observations that have been done from the ground and from space in brightness and polarization at various wavelength ranges. Local properties of the interplanetary dust particles in some given locations can be retrieved from the inversion of the zodiacal light integrated along the light-of-sight. We show that the current community consensus favors that the majority of the interplanetary dust particles detected at 1 au originate from the activity of comets. Our current understanding of the interplanetary dust particles properties is then discussed in the context of the recent results from the Rosetta rendezvous space mission with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  13. #1693
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    More news on the exomoon candidate Kepler 1625b I: how big might it be, and so forth.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.10138
    Exploring formation scenarios for the exomoon candidate Kepler 1625b I
    Ricardo Moraes, Ernesto Vieira Neto
    [Submitted on 20 May 2020]
    If confirmed, the Neptune-size exomoon candidate in the Kepler 1625 system will be the first natural satellite outside our Solar System. Its characteristics are nothing alike we know for a satellite. Kepler 1625b I is expected to be as massive as Neptune and to orbit at 40 planetary radii around a ten Jupiter mass planet. Because of its mass and wide orbit, this satellite was firstly thought to be captured instead of formed in-situ. In this work, we investigated the possibility of an in-situ formation of this exomoon candidate. To do so, we performed N-body simulations to reproduce the late phases of satellite formation and use a massive circum-planetary disc to explain the mass of this satellite. Our setups started soon after the gaseous nebula dissipation, when the satellite embryos are already formed. Also for selected exomoon systems we take into account a post-formation tidal evolution. We found that in-situ formation is viable to explain the origin of Kepler 1625b I, even when different values for the star-planet separation are considered. We show that for different star-planet separations the minimum amount of solids needed in the circum-planetary disc to form such a satellite varies, the wider is this separation more material is needed. In our simulations of satellite formation many satellites were formed close to the planet, this scenario changed after the tidal evolution of the systems. We concluded that if the Kepler1625 b satellite system was formed in-situ, tidal evolution was an important mechanism to sculpt its final architecture.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  14. #1694
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    There are interstellar comets and asteroids, and also interstellar meteoroids.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.10896
    Possible Interstellar meteoroids detected by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar
    Mark Froncisz, Peter Brown, Robert J. Weryk
    [Submitted on 21 May 2020]
    We examine meteoroid orbits recorded by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) from 2012-2019, consisting of just over 11 million orbits in a search for potential interstellar meteoroids. Our 7.5 year survey consists of an integrated time-area product of ∼7 × 10^6 km^2 hours. Selecting just over 160000 six station meteor echoes having the highest measured velocity accuracy from within our sample, we found five candidate interstellar events. These five potential interstellar meteoroids were found to be hyperbolic at the 2 σ-level using only their raw measured speed. Applying a new atmospheric deceleration correction algorithm developed for CMOR, we show that all five candidate events were likely hyperbolic at better than 3 σ, the most significant being a 3.7 σ detection. Assuming all five detections are true interstellar meteoroids, we estimate the interstellar meteoroid flux at Earth to be at least 6.6 ×10^−7 meteoroids/km^2/hr appropriate to a mass of 2 × 10^−7 kg. Using estimated measurement uncertainties directly extracted from CMOR data, we simulated CMOR's ability to detect a hypothetical 'Oumuamua - associated hyperbolic meteoroid stream. Such a stream was found to be significant at the 1.8 σ level, suggesting that CMOR would likely detect such a stream of meteoroids as hyperbolic. We also show that CMOR's sensitivity to interstellar meteoroid detection is directionally dependent.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  15. #1695
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    The "demon star" Algol is a quintuple star, not a triple star.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.13360
    Say hello to Algol D and Algol E
    L. Jetsu
    [Submitted on 27 May 2020]
    Regular changes in the observed (O) and the computed (C) epochs of binary eclipses may reveal the presence of a third or a fourth body. One recent study showed that the probability for detecting a fourth body from the O-C data is only 0.00005. We apply the new Discrete Chi-square Method (DCM) to the O-C data of Algol, and detect three wide orbit stars having orbital periods 1.9 years (Algol C), 18.6 years (Algol D) and 52.5 years (Algol E). Since our estimate for the period of Algol C agrees perfectly with the previous estimates, the signals of Algol D and Algol E are certainly real. The orbits of all these three wide orbit stars are most probably co-planar, because no changes have been observed in eclipses of Algol.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  16. #1696
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    Nice paper on a planetary system with four gas giants and two debris belts, analogous to our Asteroid Belt and the Kuiper Belt. The bombardment of planets and creation of Kirkwood gaps in the debris belts is discussed.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.13562
    Enrichment of the HR 8799 planets by minor bodies and dust
    K. Frantseva, M. Mueller, P. Pokorný, F. F.S. van der Tak, I. L. ten Kate
    [Submitted on 27 May 2020]
    In the Solar System, minor bodies and dust deliver various materials to planetary surfaces. Several exoplanetary systems are known to host inner and outer belts, analogues of the main asteroid belt and the Kuiper belt. We study the possibility that exominor bodies and exodust deliver volatiles and refractories to the exoplanets in the system HR8799 by performing N-body simulations. The model consists of the host star, four giant planets (HR8799 e, d, c, and b), 650,000 test particles representing the inner belt, and 1,450,000 test particles representing the outer belt. Moreover we modelled dust populations that originate from both belts. Within a million years, the two belts evolve towards the expected dynamical structure (also derived in other works), where mean-motion resonances with the planets carve the analogues of Kirkwood gaps. We find that, after this point, the planets suffer impacts by objects from the inner and outer belt at rates that are essentially constant with time, while dust populations do not contribute significantly to the delivery process. We convert the impact rates to volatile and refractory delivery rates using our best estimates of the total mass contained in the belts and their volatile and refractory content. Over their lifetime, the four giant planets receive between 10^−4 and 10^−3M⨁ of material from both belts. The total amount of delivered volatiles and refractories, 5×10^−3M⨁, is small compared to the total mass of the planets, 11×10^3M⨁. However, if the planets were formed to be volatile-rich, their exogenous enrichment in refractory material may well be significant and observable, for example with JWST-MIRI. If terrestrial planets exist within the snow line of the system, volatile delivery would be an important astrobiological mechanism and may be observable as atmospheric trace gases.

    https://phys.org/news/2020-05-astron...planetary.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  17. #1697
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    Did powerful planetary tides crack up Charon's surface as it orbited Pluto?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2005.14101
    Charon: A brief history of tides
    Alyssa Rose Rhoden, Helle L. Skjetne, Wade G. Henning, Terry A. Hurford, Kevin J. Walsh, S. A. Stern, C. B. Olkin, J. R. Spencer, H. A. Weaver, L. A. Young, K. Ennico, the New Horizons Team
    [Submitted on 28 May 2020]
    In 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft flew past Pluto and its moon Charon, providing the first clear look at the surface of Charon. New Horizons images revealed an ancient surface, a large, intricate canyon system, and many fractures, among other geologic features. Here, we assess whether tidal stresses played a significant role in the formation of tensile fractures on Charon. Although presently in a circular orbit, most scenarios for the orbital evolution of Charon include an eccentric orbit for some period of time and possibly an internal ocean. Past work has shown that these conditions could have generated stresses comparable in magnitude to other tidally fractured moons, such as Europa and Enceladus. However, we find no correlation between observed fracture orientations and those predicted to form due to eccentricity-driven tidal stress. It thus seems more likely that the orbit of Charon circularized before its ocean froze, and that either tidal stresses alone were insufficient to fracture the surface or subsequent resurfacing remove these ancient fractures.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  18. #1698
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    Recent papers claiming some of the Centaurs are from other stars might not have been correct. See following.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.04534
    No evidence for interstellar planetesimals trapped in the Solar System
    A. Morbidelli, K. Batygin, R. Brasser, S. Raymond
    [Submitted on 8 Jun 2020]
    In two recent papers published in MNRAS, Namouni and Morais (2018, 2020) claimed evidence for the interstellar origin of some small Solar System bodies, including i) objects in retrograde co-orbital motion with the giant planets, and ii) the highly-inclined Centaurs. Here, we discuss the flaws of those papers that invalidate the authors' conclusions. Numerical simulations backwards in time are not representative of the past evolution of real bodies. Instead, these simulations are only useful as a means to quantify the short dynamical lifetime of the considered bodies and the fast decay of their population. In light of this fast decay, if the observed bodies were the survivors of populations of objects captured from interstellar space in the early Solar System, these populations should have been implausibly large (e.g. about 10 times the current main asteroid belt population for the retrograde coorbital of Jupiter). More likely, the observed objects are just transient members of a population that is maintained in quasi-steady state by a continuous flux of objects from some parent reservoir in the distant Solar System. We identify in the Halley type comets and the Oort cloud the most likely sources of retrograde coorbitals and highly-inclined Centaurs.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  19. #1699
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    A solar puzzle that has perhaps been resolved.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.06265
    Is the faint young Sun problem for Earth solved?
    Benjamin Charnay, Eric T. Wolf, Bernard Marty, François Forget
    [Submitted on 11 Jun 2020]
    Stellar evolution models predict that the solar luminosity was lower in the past, typically 20-25 % lower during the Archean (3.8-2.5 Ga). Despite the fainter Sun, there is strong evidence for the presence of liquid water on Earth's surface at that time. This "faint young Sun problem" is a fundamental question in paleoclimatology, with important implications for the habitability of the early Earth, early Mars and exoplanets. Many solutions have been proposed based on the effects of greenhouse gases, atmospheric pressure, clouds, land distribution and Earth's rotation rate. Here we review the faint young Sun problem for Earth, highlighting the latest geological and geochemical constraints on the early Earth's atmosphere, and recent results from 3D global climate models and carbon cycle models. Based on these works, we argue that the faint young Sun problem for Earth has essentially been solved. Unfrozen Archean oceans were likely maintained by higher concentrations of CO2, consistent with the latest geological proxies, potentially helped by additional warming processes. This reinforces the expected key role of the carbon cycle for maintaining the habitability of terrestrial planets. Additional constraints on the Archean atmosphere and 3D fully coupled atmosphere-ocean models are required to validate this conclusion.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  20. #1700
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    Pi Earth has been found! Close enough to be one, anyway. Probably a very hot Pi at that.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.07308
    π Earth: a 3.14 days Earth-sized Planet from K2's Kitchen served warm by the SPECULOOS Team
    Prajwal Niraula, Julien de Wit, Benjamin V. Rackham, Elsa Ducrot, Artem Burdanov, Ian J. M. Crossfield, Valerie Van Grootel, Catriona Murray, Lionel J. Garcia, Roi Alonso, Corey Beard, Yilen Gomez Maqueo Chew, Laetitia Delrez, Brice-Olivier Demory, Benjamin J. Fulton, Michael Gillon, Maximilian N. Gunther, Andrew W. Howard, Howard Issacson, Emmanuel Jehin, Peter P. Pedersen, Francisco J. Pozuelos, Didier Queloz, Rafael Rebolo-Lopez, Lalitha Sairam, Daniel Sebastian, Samantha Thompson, Amaury H.M.J. Triaud
    [Submitted on 12 Jun 2020]
    We report on the discovery of a transiting Earth-sized (0.95 R⊕) planet around an M3.5 dwarf star at 57 pc, EPIC ~249631677. The planet has a period of ~3.14 days, i.e. ~π, with an instellation of 7.5 S⊕. The detection was made using publicly available data from K2's Campaign 15. We observed three additional transits with SPECULOOS Southern and Northern Observatories, and a stellar spectrum from Keck/HIRES, which allowed us to validate the planetary nature of the signal. The confirmed planet is well suited for comparative terrestrial exoplanetology. While exoplanets transiting ultracool dwarfs present the best opportunity for atmospheric studies of terrestrial exoplanets with the James Webb Space Telescope, those orbiting mid-M dwarfs within 100\,pc such as EPIC~249631677b will become increasingly accessible with the next generation of observatories (e.g., HabEx, LUVOIR, OST).
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  21. #1701
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    Looking back on the first voyage to Neptune and Uranus

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.08340
    [Submitted on 29 May 2020]
    Lessons learned from (and since) the Voyager 2 flybys of Uranus and Neptune
    Heidi B. Hammel
    More than 30 years have passed since the Voyager 2 fly-bys of Uranus and Neptune. I discuss a range of lessons learned from Voyager, broadly grouped into process, planning, and people. In terms of process, we must be open to new concepts: reliance on existing instrument technologies, propulsion systems, and operational modes is inherently limiting. I cite examples during recent decades that could open new vistas in exploration of the deep outer Solar System. Planning is crucial: mission gaps that last over three decades leave much scope for evolution both in mission development and in the targets themselves. I touch only briefly on planetary science, as that is covered in other papers in this issue, but the role of the decadal surveys will be examined in this section. I also sketch out how coordination of distinct and divergent international planning timelines yields both challenges and opportunity. Finally, I turn to people: with generational-length gaps between missions, continuity in knowledge and skills requires careful attention to people. The youngest participants in the Voyager missions (myself included) now approach retirement. We share here ideas for preparing the next generation of voyagers.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  22. #1702
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    That asteroid orbiting within Venus's orbit is pretty small, 1.5 km diam, made of olivine.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.08304
    [Submitted on 15 Jun 2020]
    Physical characterization of 2020 AV2, the first known asteroid orbiting inside Venus orbit
    M. Popescu, J. de León, C. de la Fuente Marcos, O. Vaduvescu, R. de la Fuente Marcos, J. Licandro, V. Pinter, E. Tatsumi, O. Zamora, C. Farińa, L. Curelaru
    The first known asteroid with the orbit inside that of Venus is 2020~AV2. This may be the largest member of a new population of small bodies with the aphelion smaller than 0.718~au, called Vatiras. The surface of 2020~AV2 is being constantly modified by the high temperature, by the strong solar wind irradiation that characterizes the innermost region of the Solar system, and by high-energy micrometeorite impacts. The study of its physical properties represents an extreme test-case for the science of near-Earth asteroids. Here, we report spectroscopic observations of 2020~AV2 in the 0.5-1.5~μm wavelength interval. These were performed with the Nordic Optical Telescope and the William Herschel Telescope. Based on the obtained spectra, we classify 2020~AV2 as a Sa-type asteroid. We estimate the diameter of this Vatira to be 1.50 +1.10−0.65km by considering the average albedo of A-type and S-complex asteroids (pV=0.23 +0.11−0.08), and the absolute magnitude (H=16.40 ±0.78 mag). The wide spectral band around 1~μm shows the signature of an olivine rich composition. The estimated band centre BIC=1.08±0.02 μm corresponds to a ferroan olivine mineralogy similar to that of brachinite meteorites.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  23. #1703
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    This news has been all over the internet today, the nature of the compact object being unknown.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.12611
    [Submitted on 22 Jun 2020]
    GW190814: Gravitational Waves from the Coalescence of a 23 M⊙ Black Hole with a 2.6 M⊙ Compact Object
    The LIGO Scientific Collaboration & the Virgo Collaboration
    We report the observation of a compact binary coalescence involving a 22.2 - 24.3 M⊙ black hole and a compact object with a mass of 2.50 - 2.67 M⊙ (all measurements quoted at the 90% credible level). The gravitational-wave signal, GW190814, was observed during LIGO's and Virgo's third observing run on August 14, 2019 at 21:10:39 UTC and has a signal-to-noise ratio of 25 in the three-detector network. The source was localized to 18.5 deg 2 at a distance of 241 +41/−45 Mpc; no electromagnetic counterpart has been confirmed to date. The source has the most unequal mass ratio yet measured with gravitational waves. Astrophysical models predict that binaries with mass ratios similar to this event can form through several channels, but are unlikely to have formed in globular clusters. However, the combination of mass ratio, component masses, and the inferred merger rate for this event challenges all current models for the formation and mass distribution of compact-object binaries.

    MORE NEWS

    https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/news/la...-gw190814.aspx

    https://www.cnet.com/news/collision-...s-astronomers/

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0623145318.htm

    https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/23/world...rnd/index.html

    https://phys.org/news/2020-06-heavie...own-black.html
    .
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Jun-24 at 05:47 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  24. #1704
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    One of many papers out today on the planet of AU Microscopii, a star of some fame in its own right.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.13248
    [Submitted on 23 Jun 2020]
    A planet within the debris disk around the pre-main-sequence star AU Microscopii
    Peter Plavchan, et al.
    AU Microscopii (AU Mic) is the second closest pre main sequence star, at a distance of 9.79 parsecs and with an age of 22 million years. AU Mic possesses a relatively rare and spatially resolved3 edge-on debris disk extending from about 35 to 210 astronomical units from the star, and with clumps exhibiting non-Keplerian motion. Detection of newly formed planets around such a star is challenged by the presence of spots, plage, flares and other manifestations of magnetic activity on the star. Here we report observations of a planet transiting AU Mic. The transiting planet, AU Mic b, has an orbital period of 8.46 days, an orbital distance of 0.07 astronomical units, a radius of 0.4 Jupiter radii, and a mass of less than 0.18 Jupiter masses at 3 sigma confidence. Our observations of a planet co-existing with a debris disk offer the opportunity to test the predictions of current models of planet formation and evolution.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  25. #1705
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    Sep 2004
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    Ozone depletion on Earth after a 50-parsec supernova - are we done for? Not necessarily.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.15079
    [Submitted on 26 Jun 2020]
    Ozone depletion-induced climate change following a 50 pc supernova?
    Brian C. Thomas, Cody L. Ratterman (Washburn University)
    Ozone in Earth's atmosphere is known to have a radiative forcing effect on climate. Motivated by geochemical evidence for one or more nearby supernovae about 2.6 million years ago, we have investigated the question of whether a supernova at about 50 pc could cause a change in Earth's climate through its impact on atmospheric ozone concentrations. We used the "Planet Simulator" (PlaSim) intermediate-complexity climate model with prescribed ozone profiles taken from existing atmospheric chemistry modeling. We found that the effect on globally averaged surface temperature is small, but localized changes are larger and differences in atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns could be significant regionally.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  26. #1706
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    Hurricanes on red-dwarf planets? It could be possible, so colonists should be prepared.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.15120
    [Submitted on 26 Jun 2020]
    Hurricane genesis is favorable on terrestrial exoplanets orbiting late-type M dwarf stars
    Thaddeus D. Komacek, Daniel R. Chavas, Dorian S. Abbot
    Hurricanes are one of the most extreme storm systems that occur on Earth, characterized by strong rainfall and fast winds. The terrestrial exoplanets that will be characterized with future infrared space telescopes orbit M dwarf stars. As a result, the best observable terrestrial exoplanets have vastly different climates than Earth, with a large dayside-to-nightside irradiation contrast and relatively slow rotation. Hurricanes may affect future observations of terrestrial exoplanets because they enhance the vertical transport of water vapor and could influence ocean heat transport. In this work, we explore how the environment of terrestrial exoplanets orbiting M dwarf stars affects the favorability of hurricane genesis (formation). To do so, we apply metrics developed to understand hurricane genesis on Earth to three-dimensional climate models of ocean-covered exoplanets orbiting M dwarf stars. We find that hurricane genesis is most favorable on intermediate-rotating tidally locked terrestrial exoplanets with rotation periods of ∼8−10 days. As a result, hurricane genesis is most favorable for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zones of late-type M dwarf stars. The peak in the favorability of hurricane genesis at intermediate rotation occurs because sufficient spin is required for hurricane genesis, but the vertical wind shear on fast-rotating terrestrial exoplanets disrupts hurricane genesis. We find that hurricane genesis is less favorable on slowly rotating terrestrial exoplanets, which agrees with previous work. Future work using simulations that resolve hurricane genesis and evolution can test our expectations for how the environment affects the favorability of hurricane genesis on tidally locked terrestrial exoplanets.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  27. #1707
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    To old-timers, GJ 887 is perhaps better known as Lacaille 9352, one of the closest stars to our Sun.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.16372
    Submitted on 29 Jun 2020]
    A multiple planet system of super-Earths orbiting the brightest red dwarf star GJ887
    S. V. Jeffers et al.
    The nearest exoplanets to the Sun are our best possibilities for detailed characterization. We report the discovery of a compact multi-planet system of super-Earths orbiting the nearby red dwarf GJ 887, using radial velocity measurements. The planets have orbital periods of 9.3 and 21.8~days. Assuming an Earth-like albedo, the equilibrium temperature of the 21.8 day planet is approx 350 K; which is interior, but close to the inner edge, of the liquid-water habitable zone. We also detect a further unconfirmed signal with a period of 50 days which could correspond to a third super-Earth in a more temperate orbit. GJ 887 is an unusually magnetically quiet red dwarf with a photometric variability below 500 parts-per-million, making its planets amenable to phase-resolved photometric characterization.


    http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/co...352-08577.html
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamieca...ter-to-target/
    https://www.sciencealert.com/there-s...ght-years-away
    https://earthsky.org/space/exoplanet...red-dwarf-star
    https://astrobiology.nasa.gov/news/c...omers-excited/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  28. #1708
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    The Devonian mass extinction is again being attributed to a supernova explosion.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.01887
    [Submitted on 3 Jul 2020]
    Supernova Triggers for End-Devonian Extinctions?
    Brian D. Fields, Adrian L. Melott, John Ellis, Adrienne F. Ertel, Brian J. Fry, Bruce S. Lieberman, Zhenghai Liu, Jesse A. Miller, Brian C. Thomas
    The Late Devonian was a protracted period of low speciation resulting in biodiversity decline, culminating in extinction events near the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary. Recent evidence indicates that the final extinction event may have coincided with a dramatic drop in stratospheric ozone, possibly due to a global temperature rise. Here we study an alternative possible cause for the postulated ozone drop: a nearby supernova explosion that could inflict damage by accelerating cosmic rays that can deliver ionizing radiation for up to ∼100 kyr. We therefore propose that end-Devonian extinction was triggered by one or more supernova explosions at ∼20 pc, somewhat beyond the ``kill distance'' that would have precipitated a full mass extinction. Nearby supernovae are likely due to core-collapses of massive stars in clusters in the thin Galactic disk in which the Sun resides. Detecting any of the long-lived radioisotopes \sm146, \u235 or \pu244 in one or more end-Devonian extinction strata would confirm a supernova origin, point to the core-collapse explosion of a massive star, and probe supernova nucleosythesis. Other possible tests of the supernova hypothesis are discussed.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  29. #1709
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    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    The Devonian mass extinction is again being attributed to a supernova explosion.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.01887
    [Submitted on 3 Jul 2020]
    Supernova Triggers for End-Devonian Extinctions?
    Brian D. Fields, Adrian L. Melott, John Ellis, Adrienne F. Ertel, Brian J. Fry, Bruce S. Lieberman, Zhenghai Liu, Jesse A. Miller, Brian C. Thomas
    The Late Devonian was a protracted period of low speciation resulting in biodiversity decline, culminating in extinction events near the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary. Recent evidence indicates that the final extinction event may have coincided with a dramatic drop in stratospheric ozone, possibly due to a global temperature rise. Here we study an alternative possible cause for the postulated ozone drop: a nearby supernova explosion that could inflict damage by accelerating cosmic rays that can deliver ionizing radiation for up to ∼100 kyr. We therefore propose that end-Devonian extinction was triggered by one or more supernova explosions at ∼20 pc, somewhat beyond the ``kill distance'' that would have precipitated a full mass extinction. Nearby supernovae are likely due to core-collapses of massive stars in clusters in the thin Galactic disk in which the Sun resides. Detecting any of the long-lived radioisotopes \sm146, \u235 or \pu244 in one or more end-Devonian extinction strata would confirm a supernova origin, point to the core-collapse explosion of a massive star, and probe supernova nucleosythesis. Other possible tests of the supernova hypothesis are discussed.
    Here is a paper from 2004 saying a supernova could have caused the end-Devonian extinction.

    https://www.cambridge.org/core/journ...EF6CF989159807
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  30. #1710
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Hurricanes on red-dwarf planets? It could be possible, so colonists should be prepared.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2006.15120
    [Submitted on 26 Jun 2020]
    Hurricane genesis is favorable on terrestrial exoplanets orbiting late-type M dwarf stars
    Thaddeus D. Komacek, Daniel R. Chavas, Dorian S. Abbot
    Hurricanes are one of the most extreme storm systems that occur on Earth, characterized by strong rainfall and fast winds. The terrestrial exoplanets that will be characterized with future infrared space telescopes orbit M dwarf stars. As a result, the best observable terrestrial exoplanets have vastly different climates than Earth, with a large dayside-to-nightside irradiation contrast and relatively slow rotation. Hurricanes may affect future observations of terrestrial exoplanets because they enhance the vertical transport of water vapor and could influence ocean heat transport. In this work, we explore how the environment of terrestrial exoplanets orbiting M dwarf stars affects the favorability of hurricane genesis (formation). To do so, we apply metrics developed to understand hurricane genesis on Earth to three-dimensional climate models of ocean-covered exoplanets orbiting M dwarf stars. We find that hurricane genesis is most favorable on intermediate-rotating tidally locked terrestrial exoplanets with rotation periods of ∼8−10 days. As a result, hurricane genesis is most favorable for terrestrial exoplanets in the habitable zones of late-type M dwarf stars. The peak in the favorability of hurricane genesis at intermediate rotation occurs because sufficient spin is required for hurricane genesis, but the vertical wind shear on fast-rotating terrestrial exoplanets disrupts hurricane genesis. We find that hurricane genesis is less favorable on slowly rotating terrestrial exoplanets, which agrees with previous work. Future work using simulations that resolve hurricane genesis and evolution can test our expectations for how the environment affects the favorability of hurricane genesis on tidally locked terrestrial exoplanets.
    More on hurricanes on exoplanets.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.02560
    [Submitted on 6 Jul 2020]
    Hurricanes on Tidally Locked Terrestrial Planets: Fixed SST Experiments
    Mingyu Yan, Jun Yang
    Are there hurricanes on exoplanets? Tidally locked terrestrial planets around M dwarfs are the main targets of space missions for finding habitable exoplanets. Whether hurricanes can form on this kind of planet is important for their climate and habitability. Using a high-resolution global atmospheric circulation model, we investigate whether there are hurricanes on tidally locked terrestrial planets under fixed sea surface temperatures (SST). The effects of planetary rotation rate, surface temperature, and bulk atmospheric compositions are examined. We find that hurricanes can form on the planets but not on all of them. For planets near the inner edge of the habitable zone of late M dwarfs, there are more and stronger hurricanes on both day and night sides. For planets in the middle and outer ranges of the habitable zone, the possibility of hurricane formation is low or even close to zero, as suggested in the study of Bin et al.(2017). Hurricane theories on Earth are applicable to tidally locked planets when atmospheric compositions are similar to Earth. However, if background atmosphere is lighter than H2O, hurricanes can hardly be produced because convection is always inhibited due to the effect of mean molecular weight, similar to that on Saturn. These results have broad implications on the precipitation, ocean mixing, climate, and atmospheric characterization of tidally locked planets. Finally, A test with a coupled slab ocean and an earth-like atmosphere in a tide-locked orbit of 10 earth days shows that there are also hurricanes in the experiment.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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