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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1651
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    Venus has active volcanos? This research says yes.

    https://phys.org/news/2020-01-scient...volcanoes.html
    Scientists find evidence that Venus has active volcanoes
    by Suraiya Farukhi, Universities Space Research Association

    https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/6/1/eaax7445
    Our results indicate that lava flows lacking VNIR features due to hematite are no more than several years old. Therefore, Venus is volcanically active now.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  2. #1652
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    Giant asteroid crater under 1 million years old found in Laos.

    https://astronomy.com/news/2020/01/c...face-in-debris
    Crater found from asteroid that covered 10% of Earth's surface in debris
    The crater sits beneath a plain of hardened lava that formed after the asteroid impact, which occurred nearly 800,000 years ago.
    By Leslie Nemo | Published: Friday, January 03, 2020
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  3. #1653
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    An attempt to summarize current knowledge about neutron-star mergers, and what to do about them.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1909.06085

    Neutron Star Mergers and How to Study Them
    Eric Burns
    (Submitted on 13 Sep 2019 (v1), last revised 5 Jan 2020 (this version, v3))

    Neutron star mergers are the canonical multimessenger events: they have been observed through photons for half a century, gravitational waves since 2017, and are likely to be sources of neutrinos and cosmic rays. Studies of these events enable unique insights into astrophysics, particles in the ultrarelativistic regime, the heavy element enrichment history through cosmic time, cosmology, dense matter, and fundamental physics. Uncovering this science requires vast observational resources, unparalleled coordination, and advancements in theory and simulation, which are constrained by our current understanding of nuclear, atomic, and astroparticle physics. This review begins with a summary of our current knowledge of these events, the expected observational signatures, and estimated detection rates for the next decade. I then present the key observations necessary to advance our understanding of these sources, followed by the broad science this enables. I close with a discussion on the necessary future capabilities to fully utilize these enigmatic sources to understand our universe.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  4. #1654
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    A modest proposal to watch every single star until one blinks, meaning something moved in front of it.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2001.02681

    Detecting Interstellar Objects Through Stellar Occultations
    Amir Siraj, Abraham Loeb
    (Submitted on 8 Jan 2020)

    Stellar occultations have been used to search for Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud objects. We propose a search for interstellar objects based on the characteristic durations (∼0.1s) of their stellar occultation signals and high inclination relative to the ecliptic plane. An all-sky monitoring program of ∼2×10^7 stars with an R-band magnitude of 14 using 1-m telescopes with 0.1s cadences, is predicted to discover ≳5 interstellar objects per year.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  5. #1655
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    The first asteroid has been found that stays entirely within the orbit of Venus.

    https://www.syfy.com/syfywire/meet-2...e-venuss-orbit
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  6. #1656
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    Is this the largest spiral galaxy in the known universe? 800,000 LY across.

    https://hubblesite.org/contents/news...0/news-2020-01
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  7. #1657
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    Can you make planets out of a destroyed star? Possibly you can.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2001.04172

    Ionization and dissociation induced fragmentation of a tidally disrupted star into planets around a supermassive black hole
    Kimitake Hayasaki, Matthew R. Bate, Abraham Loeb
    (Submitted on 13 Jan 2020)

    We show results from the radiation hydrodynamics (RHD) simulations of tidal disruption of a star on a parabolic orbit by a supermassive black hole (SMBH) based on a three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics code with radiative transfer. We find that such a tidally disrupted star fragment and form clumps soon after its tidal disruption. The fragmentation results from the endothermic processes of ionization and dissociation that reduce the gas pressure, leading to local gravitational collapse. Radiative cooling is less effective because the stellar debris is still highly optically thick in such an early time. Our simulations reveal that a solar-type star with a stellar density profile of n=3 disrupted by a 10^6 solar mass black hole produces ∼20 clumps of masses in the range of 0.1 to 12 Jupiter masses. The mass fallback rate decays with time, with pronounced spikes from early to late time. The spikes provide evidence for the clumps of the returning debris, while the clumps on the unbound debris can be potentially freely-floating planets and brown dwarfs. This ionization and dissociation induced fragmentation on a tidally disrupted star are a promising candidate mechanism to form low-mass stars to planets around an SMBH.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  8. #1658
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    If you've ever wondered what would happen if our Sun orbited the supermassive black hole in the middle of M87, here is a clue.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1910.07760

    What Would Happen If We Were About 1 pc Away from a Supermassive Black Hole?
    Lorenzo Iorio
    (Submitted on 17 Oct 2019 (v1), last revised 21 Jan 2020 (this version, v3))

    We consider a hypothetical planet with the same mass m, radius R, angular momentum S, oblateness J2, semimajor axis a, eccentricity e, inclination I, and obliquity ε of the Earth orbiting a main-sequence star with the same mass M⋆ and radius R⋆ of the Sun at a distance r∙≃1 parsec (pc) from a supermassive black hole in the center of the hosting galaxy with the same mass M∙ of, say, M87∗. We preliminarily investigate some dynamical consequences of its presence in the neighborhood of such a stellar system on the planet's possibility of sustaining complex life over time. In particular, we obtain general analytic expressions for the long-term rates of change, doubly averaged over both the planetary and the galactocentric orbital periods Pb and P∙, of e,I,ε, which are the main quantities directly linked to the stellar insolation. We find that, for certain orbital configurations, the planet's perihelion distance q=a(1−e) may greatly shrink and lead to, in some cases, an impact with the star. I may also notably change, with variations even of the order of tens of degrees. On the other hand, ε does not seem to be particularly affected, being shifted, at most, by ≃0∘.02 over 1 Myr. Our results strongly depend on the eccentricity e∙ of the galactocentric motion.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  9. #1659
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    More theory about sub-Neptunes, and why they stay small (surface lava eats the hydrogen and other atmosphere parts).

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2001.09269

    Atmosphere Origins for Exoplanet Sub-Neptunes
    Edwin S. Kite, Bruce Fegley Jr., Laura Schaefer, Eric Ford
    (Submitted on 25 Jan 2020)

    Planets with 2 R⊕ < R < 3 R⊕ and orbital period < 100 d are abundant; these sub-Neptune exoplanets are not well understood. For example, Kepler sub-Neptunes are likely to have deep magma oceans in contact with their atmospheres, but little is known about the effect of the magma on the atmosphere. Here we study this effect using a basic model, assuming that volatiles equilibrate with magma at T∼3000 K. For our Fe-Mg-Si-O-H model system, we find that chemical reactions between the magma and the atmosphere and dissolution of volatiles into the magma are both important. Thus, magma matters. For H, most moles go into the magma, so the mass target for both H2 accretion and H2 loss models is weightier than is usually assumed. The known span of magma oxidation states can produce sub-Neptunes that have identical radius but with total volatile masses varying by 20-fold. Thus, planet radius is a proxy for atmospheric composition but not for total volatile content. This redox diversity degeneracy can be broken by measurements of atmosphere mean molecular weight. We emphasise H2 supply by nebula gas, but also consider solid-derived H2O. We find that adding H2O to Fe probably cannot make enough H2 to explain sub-Neptune radii because > 10^3 -km thick outgassed atmospheres have high mean molecular weight. The hypothesis of magma-atmosphere equilibration links observables such as atmosphere H2O / H2 ratio to magma FeO content and planet formation processes. Our model's accuracy is limited by the lack of experiments (lab and/or numerical) that are specific to sub-Neptunes; we advocate for such experiments.

    Earlier article on same: https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/20.....33K/abstract
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Jan-28 at 02:16 AM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  10. #1660
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    Tight planetary system discovered around a star only 3.7 parsecs from us.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2002.01772

    The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Characterization of the nearby ultra-compact multiplanetary system YZ Ceti
    S.Stock, J.Kemmer, S.Reffert, T.Trifonov, A.Kaminski, S.Dreizler, A.Quirrenbach, J.A.Caballero, A.Reiners, S.V.Jeffers, G.Anglada-Escudé, I.Ribas, P.J.Amado, D.Barrado, J.R.Barnes, F.F.Bauer, Z.M.Berdiñas, V.J.S.Béjar, G.A.L.Coleman, M.Cortés-Contreras, E.Díez-Alonso, A.J.Domínguez-Fernández, N.Espinoza, C.A.Haswell, A.Hatzes, T.Henning, J.S.Jenkins, H.R.A.Jones, D.Kossakowski, M.Kürster, M.Lafarga, M.H.Lee, M.J. López González, D.Montes, J.C.Morales, N.Morales, E.Pallé, S.Pedraz, E. Rodrí guez, C.Rodríguez-López, M.Zechmeister
    (Submitted on 5 Feb 2020)

    The nearby ultra-compact multiplanetary system YZ Ceti consists of at least three planets. The orbital period of each planet is the subject of discussion in the literature due to strong aliasing in the radial velocity data. The stellar activity of this M dwarf also hampers significantly the derivation of the planetary parameters. With an additional 229 radial velocity measurements obtained since the discovery publication, we reanalyze the YZ Ceti system and resolve the alias issues. We use model comparison in the framework of Bayesian statistics and periodogram simulations based on a method by Dawson and Fabrycky to resolve the aliases. We discuss additional signals in the RV data, and derive the planetary parameters by simultaneously modeling the stellar activity with a Gaussian process regression model. To constrain the planetary parameters further we apply a stability analysis on our ensemble of Keplerian fits. We resolve the aliases: the three planets orbit the star with periods of 2.02 d, 3.06 d, and 4.66 d. We also investigate an effect of the stellar rotational signal on the derivation of the planetary parameters, in particular the eccentricity of the innermost planet. Using photometry we determine the stellar rotational period to be close to 68 d. From the absence of a transit event with TESS, we derive an upper limit of the inclination of i max = 87.43 deg. YZ Ceti is a prime example of a system where strong aliasing hindered the determination of the orbital periods of exoplanets. Additionally, stellar activity influences the derivation of planetary parameters and modeling them correctly is important for the reliable estimation of the orbital parameters in this specific compact system. Stability considerations then allow additional constraints to be placed on the planetary parameters.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  11. #1661
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    The Milky Way started small, then acquired a Sausage, a Dwarf, a Sequoia, and a Koala. You have to read the paper.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2002.01512

    Reverse engineering the Milky Way
    Duncan A. Forbes
    (Submitted on 4 Feb 2020)

    The ages, metallicities, alpha-elements and integrals of motion of globular clusters (GCs) accreted by the Milky Way from disrupted satellites remain largely unchanged over time. Here we have used these conserved properties in combination to assign 76 GCs to 5 progenitor satellite galaxies -- one of which we dub the Koala dwarf galaxy. We fit a leaky-box chemical enrichment model to the age-metallicity distribution of GCs, deriving the effective yield and the formation epoch of each satellite. Based on scaling relations of GC counts we estimate the original halo mass, stellar mass and mean metallicity of each satellite. The total stellar mass of the 5 accreted satellites contributed around 10^9 M⊙ in stars to the growth of the Milky Way but over 50\% of the Milky Way's GC system. The 5 satellites formed at very early times and were likely accreted 8--11 Gyr ago, indicating rapid growth for the Milky Way in its early evolution. We suggest that at least 3 satellites were originally nucleated, with the remnant nucleus now a GC of the Milky Way. Eleven GCs are also identified as having formed ex-situ but could not be assigned to a single progenitor satellite.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  12. #1662
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    Intriguing paper posing a bridge between two planetary types; I rather like this one for the weird planet type.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2002.05243

    Irradiated ocean planets bridge super-Earth and sub-Neptune populations
    Olivier Mousis, Magali Deleuil, Artyom Aguichine, Emmanuel Marcq, Joseph Naar, Lorena Acuña Aguirre, Bastien Brugger, Thomas Goncalves
    (Submitted on 12 Feb 2020)

    With radii ranging between those of the Earth (1 R-earth) and Neptune (~3.9 R-earth), small planets constitute more than half of the inventory of the 4000-plus exoplanets discovered so far. This population follows a bimodal distribution peaking at ~1.3 R-earth (super-Earths) and 2.4 R-earth (sub-Neptunes), with few planets in between. Smaller planets are sufficiently dense to be rocky, but those with radii larger than ~1.6 R-earth are thought to display large amounts of volatiles, including in many cases hydrogen/helium gaseous envelopes up to ~30% of the planetary mass. With orbital periods less than 100 days, these low-mass planets are highly irradiated and their origin, evolution, and possible links are still debated. Here we show that close-in ocean planets affected by greenhouse effect display hydrospheres in supercritical state, which generate inflated atmospheres without invoking the presence of large H/He gaseous envelopes. We derive a new set of mass-radius relationships for ocean planets with different compositions and different equilibrium temperatures, well adapted to low-density sub-Neptune planets. Our model suggests that super-Earths and sub-Neptunes could belong to the same family of planets. The differences between their interiors could simply result from the variation of the water content in those planets. Close-in sub-Neptunes would have grown from water-rich building blocks compared to super-Earths, and not concurrently from gas coming from the protoplanetary disk. This implies that small planets should present similar formation conditions, which resemble those known for the terrestrial and dwarf planets in the solar system.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  13. #1663
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    Giant planets and brown dwarfs are formed differently, but appear similar and function much the same.

    https://scitechdaily.com/giant-exopl...e-distinction/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  14. #1664
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    More about that periodic Fast Radio Burst, that maybe it is a precessing neutron star. That would be cool.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2002.05752

    Periodic Fast Radio Bursts with Neutron Star Free/Radiative Precession
    J. J. Zanazzi, Dong Lai
    (Submitted on 13 Feb 2020)

    The CHIME/FRB collaboration recently reported the detection of a 16 day periodicity in the arrival times of radio bursts from FRB 180916.J0158+65. We study the possibility that the observed periodicity arises from free precession of a magnetized neutron star, and put constraints on different components of the star's magnetic fields. Using a simple geometric model, where radio bursts are emitted from the rotating magnetosphere of a precessing magnetar, we show that the emission pattern as a function of time can match that observed from FRB 180916.J0158+65.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  15. #1665
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    Not sure how a close-orbiting planet around a red dwarf can act as a radio-generating dynamo, but sure, okay. But why haven't other close-orbiting planets around red dwarfs been found to do the same? Why just this one?

    https://room.eu.com/news/earth-sized...ay-astronomers
    https://www.newscientist.com/article...red-dwarf-sun/
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-020-1011-9
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  16. #1666
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    Speaking of strange exoplanets, here is a suggestion that certain exoplanets around compact bodies could be VERY strange, literally so.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1911.02946

    Orbital Properties and Gravitational Wave Signatures of Strange Crystal Planets
    Joás Zapata, Rodrigo Negreiros
    (Submitted on 7 Nov 2019 (v1), last revised 18 Feb 2020 (this version, v2))

    In this paper we consider the possibility that strange quark matter may be manifested in the form of strangelet crystal planets. These planet-like objects are made up of nuggets of strange quark matter (SQM), organized in a crystalline structure. We consider the so--called strange matter hypothesis proposed by Bodmer, Witten and Terazawa, in that, strange quark matter may be the absolutely stable state of matter. In this context, we analyze planets made up entirely of strangelets arranged in a crystal lattice. Furthermore we propose that a solar system with a host compact star may be orbited by strange crystal planets. Under this assumption we calculate the relevant quantities that could potentially be observable, such as the planetary tidal disruption radius, and the gravitational waves signals that may arise from potential star-planet merger events. Our results show that strangelet crystal planets could potentially be used as an indicator for the the existence of SQM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  17. #1667
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    Remember the reports of the giant exomoon candidate that was the size of Neptune? Here's more on it (revised paper).

    https://arxiv.org/abs/1904.11896

    Loose Ends for the Exomoon Candidate Host Kepler-1625b
    Alex Teachey, David Kipping, Christopher J. Burke, Ruth Angus, Andrew W. Howard
    (Submitted on 26 Apr 2019 (v1), last revised 20 Feb 2020 (this version, v2))

    The claim of an exomoon candidate in the Kepler-1625b system has generated substantial discussion regarding possible alternative explanations for the purported signal. In this work we examine in detail these possibilities. First, the effect of more flexible trend models is explored and we show that sufficiently flexible models are capable of attenuating the signal, although this is an expected byproduct of invoking such models. We also explore trend models using X and Y centroid positions and show that there is no data-driven impetus to adopt such models over temporal ones. We quantify the probability that the 500 ppm moon-like dip could be caused by a Neptune-sized transiting planet to be < 0.75%. We show that neither autocorrelation, Gaussian processes nor a Lomb-Scargle periodogram are able to recover a stellar rotation period, demonstrating that K1625 is a quiet star with periodic behavior < 200 ppm. Through injection and recovery tests, we find that the star does not exhibit a tendency to introduce false-positive dip-like features above that of pure Gaussian noise. Finally, we address a recent re-analysis by Kreidberg et al (2019) and show that the difference in conclusions is not from differing systematics models but rather the reduction itself. We show that their reduction exhibits i) slightly higher intra-orbit and post-fit residual scatter, ii) ≃ 900 ppm larger flux offset at the visit change, iii) ≃ 2 times larger Y-centroid variations, and iv) ≃ 3.5 times stronger flux-centroid correlation coefficient than the original analysis. These points could be explained by larger systematics in their reduction, potentially impacting their conclusions.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  18. #1668
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    What if there is a compact object made of dark matter orbiting the Earth... close to the Earth's core, inside the Earth? I recall an SF novel about this idea some decades ago, but here is a current paper on the subject.

    NEWS: https://phys.org/news/2020-02-compac...arth-core.html

    and the paper:

    https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstrac...ett.124.051102

    Gravimeter Search for Compact Dark Matter Objects Moving in the Earth
    C. J. Horowitz and R. Widmer-Schnidrig
    Phys. Rev. Lett. 124, 051102 – Published 7 February 2020

    Difficult to wrap my head around this idea, but it's cool and I like it. LATER: The SF novel with a black hole inside the Earth was David Brin's Earth, which I admit I did not like. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth_(Brin_novel)
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Feb-22 at 08:47 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  19. #1669
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    Can you make a Type Ia supernova into a BETTER standard candle?

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2002.09490

    A Possible Distance Bias for Type Ia Supernovae with Different Ejecta Velocities
    M. R. Siebert, R. J. Foley, D. O. Jones, K. W. Davis
    (Submitted on 21 Feb 2020)

    After correcting for their light-curve shape and color, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are precise cosmological distance indicators. However, there remains a non-zero intrinsic scatter in the differences between measured distance and that inferred from a cosmological model (i.e., Hubble residuals or HRs), indicating that SN Ia distances can potentially be further improved. We use the open-source relational database kaepora to generate composite spectra with desired average properties of phase, light-curve shape, and HR. At many phases, the composite spectra from two subsamples with positive and negative average HRs are significantly different. In particular, in all spectra from 9 days before to 15 days after peak brightness, we find that SNe with negative HRs have, on average, higher ejecta velocities (as seen in nearly every optical spectral feature) than SNe with positive HRs. At +4 days relative to B-band maximum, using a sample of 62 SNe Ia, we measure a 0.091 +/- 0.035 mag HR step between SNe with Si II 6355 line velocities higher/lower than -11,000 km/s (the median velocity). After light-curve shape and color correction, SNe with higher velocities tend to have underestimated distance moduli relative to a cosmological model. The intrinsic scatter in our sample reduces from 0.094 mag to 0.082 mag after making this correction. Using the Si II 6355 velocity evolution of 115 SNe Ia, we estimate that a velocity difference > 500 km/s exists at each epoch between the positive-HR and negative-HR samples with 99.4% confidence. Finally at epochs later than +37 days, we observe that negative-HR composite spectra tend to have weaker spectral features in comparison to positive-HR composite spectra.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  20. #1670
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    This paper on possible Hawking points indicating the existence of a previous cosmos has been revised yet again. Topic is fascinating, one would think game-changing, so it might be of interest. https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.01740
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  21. #1671
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    A white dwarf has an ice giant in a close orbit, and the planet seems to be doing a fine job of throwing asteroidal debris out of the system. Nice setting for SF. https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.00020
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  22. #1672
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    A massive blue variable star has vanished. Where'd it go? https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.02242
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  23. #1673
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    Reverse engineering the Milky Way has turned up new data on the little-known precursor galaxy called the Kraken. https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.01119
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  24. #1674
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    Can a gas giant like Jupiter have only ONE moon? Probably a giant one, but only one? That turns out to be a tricky question, but yes. ME: I think an eccentric large satellite that swept up debris of other moons could do it, later throwing out extra satellites. There was a large eccentric super-Neptune discovered a year or so ago that seemed to be alone, no other planets, so something along that line. LaTER see Kepler 1656b.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.05052

    Formation of single-moon systems around gas giants
    Yuri I. Fujii, Masahiro Ogihara
    (Submitted on 11 Mar 2020)

    Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the formation process of satellite systems, and relatively large moons are thought to be born in circumplanetary disks. Making a single-moon system is known to be more difficult than multiple-moon or moonless systems. We aim to find a way to form a system with a single large moon, such as Titan around Saturn. We examine the orbital migration of moons, which change their direction and speed depending on the properties of circumplanetary disks. We modeled dissipating circumplanetary disks with taking the effect of temperature structures into account and calculated the orbital evolution of Titan-mass satellites in the final evolution stage of various circumplanetary disks. We also performed N-body simulations of systems that initially had multiple satellites to see whether single-moon systems remained at the end. The radial slope of the disk-temperature structure characterized by the dust opacity produces a patch of orbits in which the Titan-mass moons cease inward migration and even migrate outward in a certain range of the disk viscosity. The patch assists moons initially located in the outer orbits to remain in the disk, while those in the inner orbits fall onto the planet. We demonstrate for the first time that systems can form that have only one large moon around giant planet. Our N-body simulations suggest satellite formation was not efficient in the outer radii of circumplanetary disks.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Mar-12 at 06:57 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  25. #1675
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    The supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud in 1987 could have come from a stellar merger producing a blue supergiant.

    Merger between two stars led to blue supergiant, iconic supernova
    https://phys.org/news/2020-03-merger...nt-iconic.html

    https://iopscience.iop.org/article/1...38-4357/ab5dba
    Matter Mixing in Aspherical Core-collapse Supernovae: Three-dimensional Simulations with Single-star and Binary Merger Progenitor Models for SN 1987A
    Masaomi Ono1,2, Shigehiro Nagataki1,2, Gilles Ferrand1,2, Koh Takahashi3, Hideyuki Umeda4, Takashi Yoshida4, Salvatore Orlando5, and Marco Miceli5,6
    Published 2020 January 15 • © 2020. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
    The Astrophysical Journal, Volume 888, Number 2
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  26. #1676
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    "Razor sharp" images of M87's black hole rings? Coming your way soon.

    https://scitechdaily.com/path-to-raz...-substructure/
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  27. #1677
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    https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.10314

    A remnant planetary core in the hot Neptunian desert
    David J. Armstrong, et al.
    (Submitted on 23 Mar 2020)

    The interiors of giant planets remain poorly understood. Even for the planets in the Solar System, difficulties in observation lead to major uncertainties in the properties of planetary cores. Exoplanets that have undergone rare evolutionary pathways provide a new route to understanding planetary interiors. We present the discovery of TOI-849b, the remnant core of a giant planet, with a radius smaller than Neptune but an anomalously high mass Mp = 40.8 +2.4/−2.5 M⊕ and density of 5.5 ± 0.8 gcm^−3, similar to the Earth. Interior structure models suggest that any gaseous envelope of pure hydrogen and helium consists of no more than 3.9 +0.8/−0.9 % of the total mass of the planet. TOI-849b transits a late G type star (Tmag = 11.5) with an orbital period of 18.4 hours, leading to an equilibrium temperature of 1800K. The planet's mass is larger than the theoretical threshold mass for runaway gas accretion. As such, the planet could have been a gas giant before undergoing extreme mass loss via thermal self-disruption or giant planet collisions, or it avoided substantial gas accretion, perhaps through gap opening or late formation. Photoevaporation rates cannot provide the mass loss required to reduce a Jupiter-like gas giant, but can remove a few M⊕ hydrogen and helium envelope on timescales of several Gyr, implying that any remaining atmosphere is likely to be enriched by water or other volatiles from the planetary interior. TOI-849b represents a unique case where material from the primordial core is left over from formation and available to study.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  28. #1678
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    Found this one intriguing because it talks about supermassive stars turning into quasars. Gotta read it.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2003.10467
    On Monolithic Supermassive Stars
    Tyrone E. Woods, Alexander Heger, Lionel Haemmerlé
    (Submitted on 23 Mar 2020)
    Supermassive stars have been proposed as the progenitors of the massive (∼10^9 M⊙) quasars observed at z∼7. Prospects for directly detecting supermassive stars with next-generation facilities depend critically on their intrinsic lifetimes, as well as their formation rates. We use the 1D stellar evolution code Kepler to explore the theoretical limiting case of zero-metallicity, non-rotating stars, formed monolithically with initial masses between 10k M⊙ and 190k M⊙. We find that stars born with masses between ∼60k M⊙ and ∼150k M⊙ collapse at the end of the main sequence, burning stably for ∼1.5Myr. More massive stars collapse directly through the general relativistic instability after only a thermal timescale of ∼3 kyr -- 4kyr. The expected difficulty in producing such massive, thermally-relaxed objects, together with recent results for currently preferred rapidly-accreting formation models, suggests that such ``truly direct'' or ``dark'' collapses may not be typical for supermassive objects in the early Universe. We close by discussing the evolution of supermassive stars in the broader context of massive primordial stellar evolution and the possibility of supermassive stellar explosions.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  29. #1679
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,322
    Uranus's magnetic field causes its atmosphere to leak out.

    https://phys.org/news/2020-03-revisi...ts-secret.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  30. #1680
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,322
    Arrokoth makes the news again, twice.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.00727
    The Geology and Geophysics of Kuiper Belt Object (486958) Arrokoth
    J.R. Spencer et al.
    (Submitted on 1 Apr 2020)
    The Cold Classical Kuiper Belt, a class of small bodies in undisturbed orbits beyond Neptune, are primitive objects preserving information about Solar System formation. The New Horizons spacecraft flew past one of these objects, the 36 km long contact binary (486958) Arrokoth (2014 MU69), in January 2019. Images from the flyby show that Arrokoth has no detectable rings, and no satellites (larger than 180 meters diameter) within a radius of 8000 km, and has a lightly-cratered smooth surface with complex geological features, unlike those on previously visited Solar System bodies. The density of impact craters indicates the surface dates from the formation of the Solar System. The two lobes of the contact binary have closely aligned poles and equators, constraining their accretion mechanism.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2004.01017
    Initial results from the New Horizons exploration of 2014 MU69, a small Kuiper Belt Object
    S. A. Stern, et al.
    (Submitted on 2 Apr 2020)
    The Kuiper Belt is a distant region of the Solar System. On 1 January 2019, the New Horizons spacecraft flew close to (486958) 2014 MU69, a Cold Classical Kuiper Belt Object, a class of objects that have never been heated by the Sun and are therefore well preserved since their formation. Here we describe initial results from these encounter observations. MU69 is a bi-lobed contact binary with a flattened shape, discrete geological units, and noticeable albedo heterogeneity. However, there is little surface color and compositional heterogeneity. No evidence for satellites, ring or dust structures, gas coma, or solar wind interactions was detected. By origin MU69 appears consistent with pebble cloud collapse followed by a low velocity merger of its two lobes.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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