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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #271
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    New papers Friday, 10 August 2012

    Light - forty-one new papers tonight - I suspect a slow down of Olympic proportions. I couldn't find much, but I also couldn't look for long - frustrating network issues.

    Dark Matter:

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1208.1850.pdf In the introduction, the authors talk about the 'great progress' in Dark Matter research; but I'm not sure tighter constraints on what Dark Matter might be is really all that progressive. Is it?

    Gamma Rays

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.1856 Indentifies a fairly tight inverse correlation between long gamma ray luminosity at 200 sec and the decay rate; but there is a degeneracy in a pair of interpretive models: Either bright events decay faster; and/or the relationship is dependent upon the viewing angle. Why isn't there a good stereo gamma ray detector about when you need one?
    Last edited by antoniseb; 2012-Aug-10 at 04:05 PM.
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  2. #272
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    From 13 August 2012

    There are 35 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements.
    Topics: *Satellites of Dwarfs, Looking for Lorentz Variance, GCs around M86 *

    *Satellites of Dwarfs* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2027 One of the things I keep hearing about is how the number of satellites around galaxies is way to small based on computer models of the LCDM universe. This paper looks at the number and properties of satellites around dwarf galaxies in the Sloan Survey (SDSS) and finds that for them, the observations match the model.

    *Looking for Lorentz Variance* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2033 There is an idea that photons at the highest energies might go slightly slower because of quantum foam (or other such smallest units of space-time ideas). If observed this could be a great way to constrain variations on String Theory, or LQG, etc. So far, we've tried looking at transient events from far away (Short GRBs have photons of all energies arriving at almost the same second after billions of lightyears of travel, so the effect is tiny if existent at all). This paper is about looking for the effect using high energy photons from pulsars... which is poentially competitive on the sensitivity front, but more importantly, repeatable.

    *GCs around M86* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2093 This paper is about the 25 globular clusters orbiting M86 (a giant elliptical). It looks at their velocities (and the implied mass distribution in M86) as well as their age and metalicity, leading to some new insight as to the dates when begin merger activities happened leading to the creation of M86.
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  3. #273
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 14 Aug 2012

    CATEGORIES: GRAVITY SENSORS, EXOPLANETS AND BROWN DWARFS, MISC

    This week in awesome is a gravity based sensor to detect and track stealth aircraft.

    Oh, also a claimed proof of Goldbach's conjecture.

    ---

    GRAVITY SENSORS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2377 - Gravimetric Radar: Gravity-Based Detection of a Point-Mass Moving in a Static Background

    If this works, then you can really forget about stealth in space. Also, this is the first step toward developing the Total Perspective Vortex.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2293 - How to measure the speed of gravity

    A sweet little proposal for an experiment to measure the speed of gravity.

    ---

    EXOPLANETS AND BROWN DWARFS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2270 - From Protoplanetary Disks to Extrasolar Planets: Understanding the Life Cycle of Circumstellar Gas with Ultraviolet Spectroscopy

    This paper describes four ways in which a high sensitivity low noise UV spectroscopic sensor mission could be used to study exoplanetary system formation and atmospheres. Among these is studying atmospheres of transiting exoplanets; the other concepts are also interesting even if you're mainly interested in the transit method.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2273 - PRECISE DOPPLER MONITORING OF BARNARD’S STAR

    This paper is an example of how to not find exoplanets via the radial method. It excludes a wide range of exoplanets, including previous claims as well as Earthlike planets in the habitable zone (unless face-on).


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2323 - BROWN DWARF COMPANION MICROLENSING BINARIES

    This paper shows 7 candidate microlensing events detecting brown dwarfs. It includes a nice graph/diagram combo showing the light curve in relation to the positions of the binary components and caustic.

    ---

    MISC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2487 - Design of Magnetic Graphene-ribbon for 100 Tera-bit/inch2 Information Storage Media

    This awesome paper features gorgeous pictures explaining a graphene based concept for magnetic media.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2473 - THE GOLDBACH’S CONJECTURE PROVED

    This paper claims to prove Goldbach's conjecture. If I need to say anything more, then you wouldn't understand this paper anyway.

  4. #274
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    From 15 August 2012

    Topics: *M87 Engine, Stellar Spin Orientation, MIDAS*

    *M87 Central Engine* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2702 What generates the very high energy gamma rays that come from M87's center? Hey, it's the black hole, right? Well, how exactly does that happen? This paper looks at what we know about that, from what's been observed.

    *Stellar Spin Orientation* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2810 What caught my eye was the name of the system: *DeSSpOt*. This is a cool instrument designed to determine the orientation of the spin of stars as seen from Earth. There are lots of reasons for wanting to know this (planet search, brightness of standard candles, etc) but just that we can do it is really unexpected to me.

    *MIDAS* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2734 I post a lot about the UHECRs. MIDAS is a system using microwaves to study the trails of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays as they slam into our upper atmosphere, which can potentially increase the observing time 10-fold over our current optical methods that only work on clear moonless nights.
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  5. #275
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    For 15 August 2012

    There were 57 papers Of those there were 34 new, 3 cross posted, leaving 20 replacements. In addition to the papers below, there was a three paper sequence on Metal Poor Stars, a couple of papers on Cosmological simulations using Self-interacting dark matter, a couple on astrostatistics, a couple (from different directions) on IR spectra of galaxies, and finally, several on various aspects of stellar activity and MHD. For those who want to check out other papers, they can find them here


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2979 Lateral Distribution of Muons in IceCube Cosmic Ray Events
    IceCube Collaboration: R. Abbasi et al.

    A look at how the measurement of muons in the IceCube neutrino telescope indicates that the higher the energy of the muon, the more likely they come from charm quark reactions

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2985 On the role of feedback in shaping the cosmic abundance and clustering of neutral atomic hydrogen in galaxies
    Han-Seek Kim et al.

    Looks at using the GALFORM models to determine how feedback (supernova, AGN, photo-ionization background (think the SZ effect)), can affect the amount of HI as a function of cosmic time and how the mass of H2 affects the star formation rate

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3103 A double cluster at the core of 30 Doradus
    Sabbi et al.

    Looks at two distinct stellar clusters near the center of 30 Doradus HII region. The difference in age and make up indicate that the two clusters are currently merging. the age difference is indicated by spectral types of stars in each cluster.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3107 The distribution of SNRs with Galactocentric radius
    A. Green

    This paper looks at supernova remnants (SNR) and their distribution in the galaxy. While selection effects and a lack of good distance indicators limit precise distribution this paper does constrain the distribution and shows the current best distribution fits are for lower radii.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2963 On the fraction of star formation occurring in bound stellar clusters
    M. Diederik Kruijssen

    This paper presents the idea of cluster formation efficiencies increasing with galactic gas surface densities. It also find that current observations fit rather well with this idea. It also presents the predicition that 30-50% of all stars formed in bound clusters and how this prediction can be verified with Gaia and ALMA

  6. #276
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    Quote Originally Posted by antoniseb View Post
    From 15 August 2012

    Topics: *M87 Engine, Stellar Spin Orientation, MIDAS*

    *M87 Central Engine* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2702 What generates the very high energy gamma rays that come from M87's center? Hey, it's the black hole, right? Well, how exactly does that happen? This paper looks at what we know about that, from what's been observed.

    *Stellar Spin Orientation* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2810 What caught my eye was the name of the system: *DeSSpOt*. This is a cool instrument designed to determine the orientation of the spin of stars as seen from Earth. There are lots of reasons for wanting to know this (planet search, brightness of standard candles, etc) but just that we can do it is really unexpected to me.

    *MIDAS* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.2734 I post a lot about the UHECRs. MIDAS is a system using microwaves to study the trails of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays as they slam into our upper atmosphere, which can potentially increase the observing time 10-fold over our current optical methods that only work on clear moonless nights.
    Antoniseb. Like the stellar spin trick. Pretty clever. pete

  7. #277
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    New Archive Papers for Friday, August 17

    Fourty-seven new papers today, including cross-listings.
    Starting with the high energy physics stuff:

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1208.3373.pdf The cosmology of the Fab-Four
    Catchy title, but can you dance to it? You should be able to (the principle author is Copeland. The 'fab four' are four free=scalers that resolve 'the' problems in 'the' current model. I think it was Fermi who commented he can make an elephant with four free parameters, a dancing one at that.

    or if you prefer: http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3408
    you can get there with only one free parameter tuned to today and now.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3309 Brent Scully is still plugging away, this is a Tully-Fisher paper studying the relationship in the mid-IR range.]

    Supernova paper of the day: http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3217 looks at super-luminous events; breaking them into three general categories.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3194 Correlates solar magnetic periods with the size of umbral.
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  8. #278
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    Is there an underlying theory of gravity? Thimk. SEE:http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1208/1208.3222.pdf

  9. #279
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    From 20 August, 2012

    There are 40 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements.
    Topics: *High Velocity Clouds, Halo Red Shift, Anti-nuclei *

    *High Velocity Clouds* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3463 We see clouds of pre-galactic Hydrogen moving fairly rapidly around our galaxy, and the usual thought was that they were debris from tidal tails of galactic mergers, but with the recent questions about where are all the dwarf satellites, this group looked into whether the HVCs might be unformed satellites... but the evidence is that the HVCs are not associated with significant excesses of Dark Matter, so the answer is no. Cool idea. I'm glad it was examined.

    *Halo Red Shift* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3471 Big clusters have a lot of mass, and if the dark matter models for clusters are correct, the centers of these clusters should be creating a detectable amount of gravitational red shift for the central giant ellipticals. Of course, you can't look at one galaxy, and know how much red shift is cosmological, how much is due to movement to or from us within the frame of reference (peculiar velocity), and how much is Gravitational... but if you look at many galaxies in the cluster, and compare the red shifts of the outer galaxies, and compare them to the central galaxy ... for enough clusters... you can do it. The results were about what current models said they'd be.

    *Anti-nuclei* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3614 Groups are looking for evidence of anti-nuclei in cosmic rays. Anti-protons are one thing, but seeing anything heavier than anti-Helium would be strong evidence for their being regions of the universe with anti-matter dominating. We haven't seen anything like that yet. In this paper, they look at simulatinginteractions between matter and anti-Tritium, anti-Dueterium, and anti-Helium using existing particle accelerator facilities, so that we can better model what such an interaction would look like in nature.
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  10. #280
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    From 22 August, 2012

    There are 48 papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements.
    Topics: *Pulsars and PBHs, Reionization, Feeding a Galaxy*

    *Pulsars and PBHs* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4101 One of my frequent correspondents is very interested in Primordial Black Holes (PBHs) as a possible major constituent of Dark Matter. We are slowly ruling out various sizes of PBHs by different means of observation. This paper looks at how Pulsar timing arrays using the SKA could potentially rule out PBHs from the mass of the Earth down to one millionth the mass of the Earth (or discover them!)

    *Reionization* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4277 Omniscopes? What can we learn about the epoch of reionization, and then by extension, about the universe as a whole with better instruments? This paper considers what might be observable in the future, and what it can help us distinguish about between comological models.

    *Feeding a Galaxy* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4323 How do massive giant ellipticals get their mass? With a feeding tube! This paper is about a weak-lensing survey showing a giant filament feeding a giant elliptical.
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  11. #281
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    For 23 August 2012

    There were 65 papers Of those there were 42 new, 2 cross posted, leaving 21 replacements. In addition to the papers below, there were a couple of papers on solar spicules, several papers on IR observations, a couple more on inner relativistic jet structure, several on circumstellar disks, several papers on AGNs and finally, a couple of papers on galactic evolution. For those who want to check out other papers, they can find them here


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4471 The AKARI Deep Field South: A New Home for Multiwavelength Extagalactic Astronomy
    David L. Clements

    And neat short read on multiwavelength astronomy. The importance is for galactic evolution observations, calculations of Spectral Energy Distribution are more accurate when using multiwavelengths, Cosmic Infrared Background has been observed and matches the CMB, etc. The different instruments and observations are are surveyed.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4478 Chandra grating spectroscopy of three hot white dwarfs
    Adamczak, K. Werner, T. Rauch, S. Schuh, J. J. Drake,
    J. W. Kruk

    This was interesting. Using a grating to observe soft X-rays to observe surface settling due to gravitation and determine the amount of metals in the photosphere of white dwarfs.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4489 The first detection of the 232 GHz vibrationally excited H2O maser in Orion KL with ALMA
    Tomoya Hirota, Mi Kyoung Kim, Mareki Honma

    232 GHz H20 masers are normally found in late type stars. While various other maser lines have been found around both older stars and star forming regions, this is the first detection of this line in a star forming region.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4514 The Disk-Wind-Jet Connection in the Black Hole H 1743-322
    M. Miller et al.

    X-ray Disk wind and X-ray jets seem to be mutually exclusive. Disk winds tend to come from soft x-ray states and jets seem to come from hard x-ray states. X-ray disk winds may be too diffuse to detect winds from hard sources. This paper looks at the properties of the inner accretion flow determine the different states for Disk wind or jet outflow.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4524 Black hole binary OJ287 as a testing platform for general relativity

    M J. Valtonen, A. Gopakumar, S. Mikkola, K. Wiik, H. J. Lehto

    This black hole binary was first modeled in 1995, before all of the nature and periodicities of it radiation were known. Modeling requires the use of GR, due the orbital velocity of the smaller black hole (~ .1 c). I also learned a new word, perinigricon, the nearest approach of a smaller black hole to a larger black hole, during the smaller black hole’s orbit (think perihelion for the Earth). The 12 year period of this blazar is due to the perinigricon of the smaller black hole, being within the larger black hole’s accretion disk. The longer period can be modeled based on the change in viewing angle of the jet.

  12. #282
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 21 Aug 2012

    CATEGORIES: RADAR, EXOPLANETS ETC, MISC

    Nothing this week hit my "awesome" button, but a paper on synthetic aperture radar comes close. I had thought of SAR as only useful for static targets, but this paper shows how to use it when there are also moving objects.

    ---

    RADAR

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3700 - Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging and Motion Estimation via Robust Principal Component Analysis

    This detailed paper studies the problem of moving objects on synthetic aperture radar, and attempts to deduce and separate out those moving objects. I find it interesting that it's even possible to try this. This paper is extremely math heavy, but it also has some images.

    ---

    EXOPLANETS ETC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3712 - The Neptune-Sized Circumbinary Planet Kepler-38b

    This paper analyzes transit data of a circumbinary planet. It includes oodles of graphs of various sorts in explaining the analysis. This isn't just your average transit method paper.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3713 - The Ejection of Low Mass Clumps During Star Formation

    This short paper is low on details, but the results are quite interesting. Their simulations show that low mass clumps can form and be ejected during star formation, where "low mass" can mean something as low mass as a gas giant planet.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208. - Surface Properties of Asteroids from Mid-Infrared Observations and Thermophysical Modeling

    This dissertation is basically a textbook on asteroids, with wide ranging topics and more detailed emphasis on thermophysical modeling and observations.

    ---

    MISC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3870 - Helium Ignition in the Cores of Low-Mass Stars

    This reads like a well polished textbook; good for those of us who want a digested exposition of the current science.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.3841 - Constraints on Chronologies

    This math heavy paper studies how three or more events can be chronologically ordered. Obviously, this is trivial when all events are within all of each other's light cones; this paper studies the hard cases where they aren't.

  13. #283
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    Papers Archived Friday, August 25

    I think it is another fun day - here is one for the electric universe crowd - if any of them are still standing: (not banned):

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4627 Discovery of a magnetic field in the early B-type star sigma Lupi
    Magnetic stars are typically helium and nitrogen enriched, but not all nitrogen enriched stars are observationally magnetic.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4637 A Temporal Map in Geostationary Orbit: The Cover Etching on the EchoStar XVI Artifact
    This one falls in the 'how long can you tread water?' file - using geostationary satellites as time capsules.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4649 Conservation Laws in Gravitation and Cosmology
    This paper should be required reading. (Lack of conservation in expansion theories is the elephant in the room no one wants to talk about.)
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  14. #284
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    From 27 August 2012

    There are 43 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements.
    Topics: *Sgr A-star Off Center?, RR Lyr, Massive Particles*

    *Sgr A-star Off Center?* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4844 We think of the big black hole in the center of the galaxy as "The Center of the Galaxy", but simulations and 130 GeV evidence suggest that it is orbiting a dark matter concentration and is a few hundred parsecs from the center. It's funny to think of this black hole orbiting something invisible that isn't a black hole.

    *RR Lyrae* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.4908 One of the very important types of star on the cosmic distance ladder is the RR Lyr class of stars, because they are a very standard brightness... and are easily identified by their distinctive oscillations. The Kepler probe has spent some time closely watching RR Lyr itself, and this paper is an analysis of the oscillation modes, and what they can tell us about the interior of the star. Not ground-breaking perhaps, but it caught my eye because of the importance of these stars historically.

    *Massive Particles* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5009 WIMPs are Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, but just how massive are we talking about? Using PAMELA's search for high energy anti-protons, and FERMI-LATs search (and discovery) of high energy gammas (at about 130 GeV), and following the usual assumptions about Supersymmetry, this paper concludes that either Dark Matter is complicated, or the mass of the neutralino must be over 450 GeV.
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  15. #285
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    From 29 August 2012

    There are 41 papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements.
    Topics: *Looking for Big PBHs, 130 GeV Confirmation, Uranus & Neptune*

    *Looking for Big PBHs* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5482 Continuing with the Primordial Black Hole search, this paper is about how we can rule out Thousand to Million Solar Mass primordial black holes as contributers to even 1% of dark matter by looking with submilliarsecond detail at jets that are weakly lensed by foreground galaxies. For various reasons this is already an unlikely contributer to dark matter, but these observations (once made) can rule them out altogether.

    *130 GeV Confirmation* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5488 Probably the hottest topic in astronomy right now is the 130 GeV line(s) being seen from the galactic center... which might be evidence for WIMPs annihilating each other and forming Z and H bosons. IF this is what is happening, then there will also be long-wave radio evidence that this process is occuring, and LOFAR (now) and SKA (soon) should both the able to detect it. Having an independent means of testing this exciting evidence is great news.

    *Uranus & Neptune* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5551 What do we know about Uranus and Neptune's formation? ... this paper points out that though they might be similar in size, they might be quite different from each other, and different in structure in important ways.
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  16. #286
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    From 28 August 2012

    There are 49 papers yesterday (Tuesday), not counting replacements. Isaac Kuo (who normally does Tuesday) is in Baton Rouge, and because of the hurricane with a familiar name has limited access or time today.
    Topics: *Interstellar Turbulence, Anomalous Microwaves, Baryonic Mass Fraction, Iron Core White Dwarfs*

    *Interstellar Turbulence* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5386 To what degree is the intestellar material just flowing, and on what scale and intensity is it swirling around? This paper looks at the spectrum of nuetral Hydrogen atoms in many directions to try and get an answer to that question.

    *Anomalous Microwave Emissions* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5346 Planck is out there looking at microwaves from all sources and all directions. Some stuff if foreground, which for the purposes of CMB cosmology we'd like to subtract off. This paper is about a few isolated foreground sources (typically not dust from our galaxy, but smaller sources from other clusters), and tries to identify them and build models for why they are emitting as much 15 GHz microwave radiation as they do.

    *Baryonic Mass Fraction* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5229 This is just confirming in more detail something that has already been in the public consciousness... that the ratio of baryonic mass as measured by the sum of stellar masses from SDSS and Radio work for the gas, and Dark Matter as measured by weak lensing studies varies very smoothly with halo mass. That is, that lighter halos have proportionally less baryonic matter. One explanation is that the early stars in the smaller galaxies are more able to blow the initial gas out of the whole gravity well and into intergalactic space.

    *Iron Core White Dwarfs* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5069 Is this happening? There are a small number of underluminous supernovae that are spectrally Type 1a. This paper suggests that these SN are producing Iron core White Dwarfs and kicking them into hypervelocity orbits. There aren't many of these if they exist at all, but it is yet one more new species for the zoo to look out for.
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  17. #287
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    For 30 August 2012

    There were 71 papers Of those there were 41 new, 4 cross posted, leaving 26 replacements. There was quite a grouping of papers for various phenomena that came at the phenomena from different directions. There were three or more papers on supernova remnants as astronomic accelerators, different aspects of the early solar system, and inner regions of accretion flows and jets. Two papers on the detection of water (vapor or ice) in pre or proto-stellar cores, and finally nicely bookend papers on the migration of planetary object and planetary object getting trapped in resonances in early stellar systems. For those who want to check out other papers, they can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5931 An introduction into the theory of cosmological structure formation
    Christian Knobel

    I’ll start with the difficult one first. This is a long one (102 pages) and includes some difficult math (including some GR), but I think those here, who are interested in this subject, can get something out of it, even if they don’t understand the math.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5911 Planck intermediate results. VIII. Filaments between interacting clusters
    Planck Collaboration

    Half the baryons in the universe are expected to be in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium(WHIM). Most at intermediate to high z are undetected, due to their diffuse nature. This paper finds a result, using the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effet, that is consistent with WHIM baryons in the merging clusters.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5769 New Exoplanet Surveys in the Canadian High Arctic at 80 Degrees North
    Nicholas M. Law et al

    I just found this interesting for the location, but the science is pretty cool. The site is located on Ellesmere Island (it’s the island to the west of northern Greenland). The location allow 24 hour seeing during the arctic winters, not to mention very little light pollution. The concept drawing for the future Compound Arctic Camera System.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5900 Discovery and Early Multi-Wavelength Measurements of the Energetic Type Ic Supernova PTF12gzk: A Massive-Star Explosion in a Dwarf Host Galaxy
    Sagi Ben-Ami et al

    This paper presents the observations of a type 1c supernova and constrain it to within one day of the explosion. Although identified as a type 1c, there are some characteristics that are more similar to GRB type supernova. These are 25-35 solar mass progenitors, energy of 5-1051 ergs along with the galaxy being the type that would host such a GRB type supernova.

  18. #288
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    31 Aug 2012 & 03 Sept 2012

    There are 37 papers on Friday that didn't get covered till now, and 43 today (Monday), not counting replacements.
    Friday Topics: *Low Mass Star-forming, Mid-frequency Apperature Arrays, Suspended Aerosols*
    Monday Topcis: *Turbulent Interstellar Gas, LISA parts, 130 GeV*
    *FRIDAY*
    *Low-Mass Star-Forming* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.6149 How do stars form? We've been studying that, and this paper is a look at low mass stars and brown dwarfs in a nearby active star forming region trying to get some information on the sizes of the accretion disks, and and rotation rates of the stars to determine the rates of increases of the masses of these objects.

    *Mid-frequency Apperature Arrays* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.6180 LOFAR is proving to be a great resource for long wavelength radio work. This paper is about EMBRACE and the unbuilt EMMA which will work in a much shorter wavelength space, and hopefully give the same flexibility of viewing that LOFAR gives to another rich area of the spectrum.

    *Suspended Aerosols* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.6275 How much stuff is really in the atmosphere? This paper discusses ways to measure it fairly directly.

    *MONDAY*
    *Tubulent Interstellar Gas* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.6377 Stars twinkle because of our turbulent atmosphere. The same idea should be much more subtle but still be detectable as starlight goes through gasses outside our atmosphere. This paper gives some limits on the scale of such twinkling.

    *LISA Parts* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.6418 I'm looking forward to LISA eventually getting launched, and hopefully detecting some gravitational waves. This will be a wide new area to observe in. This paper is about a cool new part (phasemeter) being prototyped and tested for this set of probes.

    *130 GeV* http://arxiv.org/abs/1208.5481 This is another paper trying to put the 130 GeV signal from the center of the galaxy into a Dark Matter perspective. Nice overview.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  19. #289
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 4 Sep 2012

    CATEGORIES: CAT-LIKE MATH, EXOPLANETS ETC, MISC

    Sorry for missing last week's arXiv review. A storm named Isaac passed through. Some were severely affected, but my family is fine.

    This week in awesome is a Julia set in the shape of a cat.

    ---

    CAT-LIKE MATH

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0143 - SHAPES OF POLYNOMIAL JULIA SETS

    Page 1 has a Julia set in the shape of a cat. Need I say more to get you to click on the link? I didn't think so.

    ---


    EXOPLANETS ETC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0050 - Exomoon habitability constrained by energy flux and orbital stability

    This concise paper gets right down to business with a study of heating, illumination, and orbital stability of exomoons. Among the conclusions is that stars with mass less than 0.2 suns cannot host habitable moons (within the various assumptions, which are clearly explained, and of course using the classic definition of habitable which means surface liquid water which excludes potentially habitable planets/moons with subsurface liquid water such as Europa etc).


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0013 - From dust to planetesimals: an improved model for collisional growth in protoplanetary disks

    This paper studies improvements to modeling protoplanetary disks. It includes a lot of graphs comparing models with or without improvements such as bouncing, fragmentation modeling, and modeling the stochastic nature of the collisions.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0101 - THE SPIN EFFECT ON PLANETARY RADIAL VELOCIMETRY OF EXOPLANETS

    This graphic and graph loaded paper calculates how planetary spin affects planetary radial velocity, so it can be used to constrain planetary spin and obliquity.

    ---

    MISC

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0089 - Estimating the historical and future probabilities of large terrorist events

    This paper analyzes the probability of 9/11-sized or larger terrorist events. Honestly, I don't really understand the probability theory behind this, but I find it rather amazing to even try, considering the sample size. It makes for interesting reading.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0057 - Anchoring Bias in Online Voting

    This study uses data from MovieLens and WikiLens to confirm and measure the existence of anchoring bias in online voting. This is the bias to tend to give a low rating after a low rating, as well as a high rating after a high rating. Various factors need to be accounted for, such as the fact that some people naturally give higher ratings, generally, and some people lower. This paper includes graphs showing how long lasting this bias is, and how it levels off.

  20. #290
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    From 05 September 2012

    There are 69 (back to school!) papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements. Lots of papers about Gravitational Waves.
    Topcis: *Cluster Mass, Flexible Mirrors, Brightness of DD SN1a*

    *Cluster Mass* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0458 A fortunate alignment of a foreground cluster (z~0.6) and a quasar and other galaxies in its cluster (at z~2.2) have given us some ability to find the mass distribution and structure of the foreground cluster. This is not a new idea, but the execution of this effort using strong lensing, weak lensing, and xrays do a great job at corroborating each other and showing us how well or poorly each method can show this distribution. Great maps, Nice images.

    *Flexible Mirrors* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0600 The business of making very large telescopes requires being able to deform them very rapidly to account for the scintillation (twinking) from the density changes in the atmosphere. This paper is about taking that technology one more step into visible wavelengths. As to the far future of this idea, we are left to imagine.

    *Brightness of Double Degenerate Type 1a SN* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0645 I wondered about this about half a year ago when it starting seeming like the majority of type 1a supernovae were pairs of white dwarfs merging, rather than the previous main idea, a single WD accreting the straw that broke the camels back. This makes them a bit less of a precisely standard candle, but just how much deviation should we be seeing? This paper examines that.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  21. #291
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    For 6 September 2012

    Large dump today, 83 papers. Of those, there were 52 new, 6 cross posted, leaving 25 replacements. In addition to the papers below, there were a couple of papers of solar flares, a couple on different aspects of radio lobes of AGN, some on various types of pulsars, and a few on dust and accretion disks. For those who want to check out other papers, they can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0783 General Relativistic Simulations of Accretion Induced Collapse of Neutron Stars to Black Holes
    Bruno Giacomazzo, Rosalba Perna

    A short paper, without the math, but with links if you want it, showing the collapse of a neutron star to a black hole, due to material falling onto the neutron star from the accretion disk.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0922 Dark Energy: a Brief Review
    Miao Li, Xiao-Dong Li, Shuang Wang, Yi Wang

    As it says, it briefly reviews the history, theoretical models, observational support having to do with Dark Energy.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0762 Identifying Contaminated K-band Globular Cluster RR Lyrae Photometry
    Daniel J. Majaess, David G. Turner, Wolfgang P. Gieren

    As antoniseb pointed out a week ago Monday, RR Lyrae stars are important for precision distances. K-band is particularly handy as it’s near IR and let’s us see through the dust and gas. This paper looks at some clusters that are contaminating the photometry of these RR Lyrae stars causing errors in the observations.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0778 Star Formation Rate Distributions: Inadequacy of the Schechter Function
    Samir Salim, Janice C. Lee

    The Schechter function is the primary luminosity function used for galaxies. This paper proposes that this function is good for near IR or optical wavelengths as most of the visible mass of a galaxy is in those wavelengths. However, it is not good for a galaxy with large areas of Star Forming Regions, due to the UV wavelengths coming from those regions.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0823 Pop III GRBs: an estimative of the event rate for future surveys
    Rafael S. de Souza

    This paper looks at recent numerical simulations from more complete theoretical models for Pop III stars to estimate the number of expected GRBs at a distance of z > 6. The paper then suggests some ways to look for such GRBs.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1002.3399 On the Field of a Binary Pulsar
    I. Wanas, N. S. Awadalla, W. S. El Hanafy

    This is not an easy paper. The Schwartzchild solution is well known as an exact solution to the Einstein Field Equations(EFE). This paper describes an exact solution of the EFE for a static field for a binary system. This can be adapted to a dynamical system in a rotating coordinate system. This was a surprise to me as I was not aware that there was an exact solution to a relativistic two body problem.

  22. #292
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    Papers archived Friday, Sep 7, 2012

    My last week's posting ended up in the eathosphere last week, and I didn't even know it.

    Fifty-six new papers, including cross listings. Where should we start?

    Supernova paper-of-the-day

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1090 Herschel limits on far infrared emission from circumstellar dust around nearby Type Ia supernovae
    Galactic and circumstellar dust are limiting factors in using supernova as standard candles - many of the methods ignore dust completely. For these three nearby events, it looks like little dust is a valid assumption

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.1288v1.pdf Triplet seesaw model: from inflation to asymmetric dark matter and leptogenesis
    When you have a universe where so little is understood, it is always nice to see a model that pulles in everything from flipping neutrinos to slow-roll inflation. Such a model would be quite valuable, if it made testable predictions. This one does not.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.1124.pdf Realistic Cyclic Magnetic Universe
    This one is a little more 'out there, but likewise the single author is trying to group many weird things into one small *Fermi elephant sized box. At least we are still trying.

    Fun things seem to happen in threes:


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1097 A Simple Recipe for the 111 and 128 GeV Lines
    Ok, this one has two authors, but once again, observations we cannot explain are 'simply' resolved by using one unknown to solve for another. It is simple algebra: If you go to the store with A amount of cash you can buy BxC items, and it simply works every time.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.1354v1.pdf Discovery of an active supermassive black hole in the bulge-less galaxy NGC 4561.
    Boy! Black hole with no bulge. When will we every find a model for black hole accretion model we can trust?

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.1347.pdf Metastable Charged Sparticles and the Cosmological 7Li Problem
    Opps, I missed one: Using 'sparticles' to ream out the Lithium problem. But of course! Fun theories come in fours!

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1132 Gamma Ray Bursts and their links with Supernovae and Cosmology
    Fun theories come in fives? Since we can't figure out the mechanism behind long, hard bursts, why not use the same unicorn invented to fix the metallicity problem: Pop III stars. This one gets credit for being testable within the next generation of scopes...come on, James Webb, it is past launch time...

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.1201v1.pdf Supernova symposium. Single degenerate systems still lead the pack amoung mainstream researchers; which is interesting in that so much of the most recent data suggest it takes two to tango.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1339 Spectral modelling of the "Super-Chandra" Type Ia SN 2009dc - testing a 2 M_sun white dwarf explosion model and alternatives
    Bumps various models up against a superduper DAR (Damn average Raiser). It is not easy to fit such a tremendous outier with models of supernova that set tight size contraints.



    *A Fermi elephant has five free parameters.
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  23. #293
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    From 10 September 2012

    There are 64 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements. There is a batch of papers about LOFT (an ESA large xray telescope proposed to launch about 2023).

    Topcis: *Reionization, Ultracool White Dwarfs, Lower Mass Pair Instability SN*

    *Reionization* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1387 One of the relatively hot topics in cosmology is mapping out the epoch of reionization, when the first galaxies (and first stars) ionized the neutral Hydrogen that had been our universe since 380,000 years after the Big Bang. This paper looks at what we can tell about the first galaxies based on WMAP data and other known constraints and measurement of the optical depth from z=5 to z=10. This paper give strength to the idea that the first stars did not need to be giants if most of the early galaxies were low-mass.

    *Ultracool White Dwarfs* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1403 Stars with initial masses under about 8 times the mass of the Sun eventually turn into white dwarfs, which are cinders no longer fusing, but merely slowly losing their heat by giving off light. Some very early stars became white dwarfs, and are now down to temperatures below 4000 K. They are small, not very luminous, and have (in some cases) atmosphere of alost pure Hydrogen. The SDSS has turned up a few of these in our neighborhood that are about 100 lightyears away. This paper is about the details we know about these artifacts of the early days of our galaxy, and what we can learn from them with further study.

    *Lower Mass Pair Instability SN* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1439 The first stars (Population III) have not been observed yet to our knowledge. One idea about them is that the big ones may have ended their normal lives as Pair Instability Supernovae (PISNs) in which huge numbers of positrons are formed, which then meet their electron counterparts and give off many 511 KeV photons in a short time. This paper is about a simulation of the formation of these Pop III stars revealing that they probably had very high rotation rates, a result of which is that the miniumum mass for a PISN is lower... closer to 65 Solar Masses. There are numerous puzzles about the early universe, and this makes some of them less puzzling.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  24. #294
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    From 12 September 2012

    There are 75 papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *BH in Trapezium?, Comet 17P/Holmes, Euclid Mission, Lunar University*

    *Black Hole in Trapezium* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2114 This paper looks at the dynamics of the stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster and speculates that a 100 Solar Mass black hole could help explain some of what we see... this is pretty sketchy, with lots of noise in with the signal, but it could be real, and be an interesting object to add to the nearby zoo.

    *Comet 17P/Holmes* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2165 What the heck happened? Comet Holmes, back in October 2007 had a strange huge outburst. The nature of the outburst has been studied, and has also been a hot topic among "alternative theorists". This paper takes a close look at the observations made with the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, and puts together a plausible model.

    *Euclid Mission* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2228 I've listed a paper on this mission previously. It is an ESA mission to make very precise measurements of weak lensing to better determine the distribution of Dark Matter in clusters... among other things. This is not a mission that will be launched anytime soon.

    *Lunar University Network for Astrophysical Research* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2233 What kind of astrophysics could we do much better on the Moon? Lots of stuff! Long wavelength radio work, things that require isolation from the Sun, things that are large and radioactive, or chemically dangerous... This 24 page illustrated document is a fun read.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  25. #295
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    For 13 September 2012

    An even larger dump today, 101 papers However, only 56 are new, 11 cross posted, with 34 replacements. As for multiple papers, there were a couple on submillimetre galaxies, a couple on GRBs, several on AGN, four(possibly five) on dust from proto-stars to galactic clusters and quite a few on different aspects of solar physics. For those who want to check out other papers, they can find them here

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2598 Redshift, Time, Spectrum - the most distant radio quasars with VLBI
    S. Frey , L. I. Gurvits , Z. Paragi, K. E. Gabanyi

    This paper looks at some very distant quasars (z >5.7) and using Very Long Baseline Interferometry looks at their inner structure (down to ~10pc). The data suggests that it’s as if these are AGN that have just turned on in a very young universe.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2509 The First Stars
    Simon C. O. Glover

    While this paper is rather long, it is not math heavy. It gives a good detailed overview on the formation of minihalos, their properties, how the gas in them forms Population III stars, and how those stars evolve and change the universe around them. It also details some questions that still cloud Pop III formation.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2412 C/O ratio as a Dimension for Characterizing Exoplanetary Atmospheres
    Nikku Madhusudhan

    Exo-planet atmospheres have been interpreted using solar elemental abundances. This paper looks at some recent discoveries that indicate that solar abundances could be wrong. And they suggest a two tier system, depending on the ratio to carbon to oxygen, for classifying exo-planet atmospheres.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2676 Maximum likelihood analysis of systematic errors in interferometric observations of the cosmic microwave background
    Le Zhang, Ata Karakci, Paul M. Sutter, Emory F. Bunn, Andrei Korotkov, Peter Timbie, Gregory S. Tucker, Benjamin D. Wandelt

    This paper looks at the possibility of systematic errors in the measurement of the temperature and polarization spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background. They found that the possibility of pointing errors on the polarization spectra (TB and TE) is less than the statistical uncertainties.

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2685 Active optics: deformable mirrors with a minimum number of actuators
    Marie Laslandes, Emmanuel Hugot, Marc Ferrari

    Interesting paper on some concepts for deformable mirrors. Including an explanation for a mirror with one actuator. Some math, but all here should be able to understand the explanations without it. But, enjoy it if you want.

  26. #296
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 11 Sep 2012

    CATEGORIES: ROOM TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS, EXOPLANETS, STARS, MATH

    This week in awesome is a paper suggesting room temperature superconductivity in water treated graphite powder. I don't know anything about the materials science of superconductivity, but this sounds way too good to be true.

    ---

    ROOM TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1938 - Can doping graphite trigger room temperature superconductivity? Evidence for granular high-temperature superconductivity in water-treated graphite powder

    I don't know whether to take this paper seriously or not. What it suggests could be huge--the possibility that water treated graphite could yield high-temperature superconductors, with critical temperature over 300K!

    ---

    EXOPLANETS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1686 - The Habitable-Zone Planet Finder: A Stabilized Fiber-Fed NIR Spectrograph for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope

    This paper details the design of a radial method planet finding instrument for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. This is of interest for those who want to see some nitty gritty details of the technology side of things. The instrument seems geared toward finding habitable zone planets around red dwarfs, though. Some consider red dwarfs to be unlikely hosts for life, for various reasons, (I don't--I am skeptical that there are really any deal-killers).

    ---

    STARS

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1709 - A multipurpose 3-D grid of stellar models

    This paper does a really nice service by taking stellar modeling knowledge and presenting them in user friendly 3d grid charts. The result is a useful easy to use reference for various purposes, including calculating suitable exposure time.

    ---

    MATH

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1977 - Ten times eighteen

    This paper is NOT a single line ending in "180". It's actually about a game where you roll 3d6 ten times, each time placing the results in slots numbered 1 to 10. The goal is to maximize the sum of the each roll multiplied by its slot number. A pretty interesting little game, and an interesting solution.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.2007 - WHAT IS THE SMALLEST PRIME?

    A cute little paper about the history of what was considered the smallest prime number.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.1965 - Universality of cauliflower-like fronts: from nanoscale thin films to macroscopic plants

    This paper demonstrates that cauliflowers are everywhere. Well, sort of. Cute, if you're into this sort of thing.

  27. #297
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    Archive Papers for Friday 14 September 2012

    Good stuff tonight, starting where I rarely go:

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.2705.pdf THE BIZARRE CHEMICAL INVENTORY OF NGC 2419, AN EXTREME OUTER HALO GLOBULAR
    CLUSTER

    One of the confidence builders of our current model of why metallic abundances are what they are, is that the basic model works in so many places. It is unusual to find an atomic profile such as this, and (likely) requires an exceptional model of how this cluster came to be.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.2706.pdf Cosmological Implications of the Effective Field Theory of Cosmic Acceleration
    This is a 'you can't get there from here' conclusion trying to marry effective field theory with (Alpha)CDM cosmology. In this case, I'm not certain which toy model the the baby, and which is the bath water.

    http://arxiv.org/pdf/1209.2707.pdf EVIDENCE FOR A WIDE RANGE OF UV OBSCURATION IN Z ~ 2 DUSTY GALAXIES FROM THE
    GOODS-HERSCHEL SURVEY It is found, and this is not surprising, that galaxies with high IR emissions likely have dust obscured UV regions.
    “It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. Insensibly one begins to twist facts to suit theories, instead of theories to suit facts.” ― Arthur Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes

  28. #298
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    From 17 September 2012

    There are 45 papers today (Monday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *Long Wave Radio on the Moon, A Big Space Telescope, BAO Radio*

    *Long Wave Radio on the Moon* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3033 There have been a lot of "gee, we should do this on the Moon" conversations about long wave radio, where human EMI will not polute the signal, and where the Earth's ionosphere and exosphere will not corrupt the signal... The day that we actually do this may be upon us. The ESA is considering a Lunar lander that would lay out a radio array inside a South Pole crater. Bigger and better instruments will doubtless come later, but this is a start.

    *A Big Space Telescope* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3199 This paper looks at that could be observed with a 10-meter or better space telescope with spectral capabilities from Lyman continuum down to near infrared... especially as pertains to looking at massive stars in nearby galaxies as producers of the chemical isotopes. http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3272 adds some depth to the discussion of what faint Lyman series observations can tell us about something mostly unknowable today.

    *BAO Radio* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3266 Mapping Hydrogen out a long way (past z=3) will provide some very strong constraints on many aspects of the universe, including Dark Matter. This paper is a proposal for such a 3D mapping.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  29. #299
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    From 19 September 2012

    There are 62 papers today (Wednesday), not counting replacements.

    Topcis: *Machine Learning, Rocks in the Rings, Next 2 Micron Survey*

    *Machine Learning* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3775 There are a number of large synoptic surveys underway, and the process of analyzing the data will take new methods. This paper is about the use of machine learning to sort out the many false positives in transient data.

    *Rocks in the Rings* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3799 Cassini has made some observations showing that the C ring around Saturn includes numerous pebbles in the 1 to 10 cm diameter range.

    *Next 2 Micron Survey* http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3837 New instruments are coming covering the mid to deep infrared sky. This paper is about an effort to do some mapping from the South Pole (well, Dome A actually) in the 2 Micron range, so as to find some of the first galaxies for more detailed observation by the JWST, Euclid, and other probes.
    Forming opinions as we speak

  30. #300
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    Fun Papers from arXiv - From 18 Sep 2012

    CATEGORIES: BIOLOGICAL, ASTRONOMICAL

    This week in awesome is a paper modeling the autobahn with slime molds and oat flakes on a map of Germany.

    ---

    BIOLOGICAL

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3474 - Schlauschleimer in Reichsautobahnen: Slime mould imitates motorway network in Germany

    Take a map of Germany. Put oat flakes on the major cities. Let a slime mold have its way. Voila! The autobahn! No, really! Well, not exactly, but this paper is a fun study of the results.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3329 - Fluid transport by individual microswimmers

    A cool paper showing how fluid particles move under the effect of a microscopic swimmer swimming in an infinite straight line.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3330 - Predator confusion is sufficient to evolve swarming

    This graphic loaded paper simulates predators with a semicircular field of view in a 2d world with prey to co-evolve behaviors. I can't help but think of ways this could be applied to game and animation AI.

    ---

    ASTRONOMICAL

    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3563 - The History of Astrometry

    This is a nice summary of the history of astrometry, sticking with determining star positions and parallaxes. I was hoping for something on the astrometry method of exoplanet detection, but that wasn't included here.


    http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.3743 - NEUTRINO ASTROPHYSICS

    A broad introduction to neutrino astrophysics. Even this pretty basic introduction is still above my head, but I figure many would benefit.

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