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Thread: Fun Papers In Arxiv

  1. #1741
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Could dark matter collect at Earth's core and turn into a planet-eating black hole, destroying us all? This paper seems to say "yes". I mean, "probably not".
    "Is it time to panic? This reporter says, yes!"
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  2. #1742
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    That’s that 22 day heartbeat circling the core in a decaying intra-orbit since Tunguska, thus the space brothers and Musk, don’t ya know?

  3. #1743
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    Winds and jet streams found on the closest brown dwarf. The team used NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, space telescope to study the two brown dwarfs closest to Earth. At only 6 1/2 light-years away, the brown dwarfs are called Luhman 16 A and B. While both are about the same size as Jupiter, they are both more dense and therefore contain more mass. Luhman 16 A is about 34 times more massive than Jupiter, and Luhman 16 B—which was the main subject of Apai's study—is about 28 times more massive than Jupiter and about 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit hotter.

    https://phys.org/news/2021-01-jet-st...own-dwarf.html

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2101.02253

    TESS Observations of the Luhman 16AB Brown Dwarf System: Rotational Periods, Lightcurve Evolution, and Zonal Circulation

    Daniel Apai, Domenico Nardiello, Luigi R. Bedin

    Brown dwarfs were recently found to display rotational modulations, commonly attributed to cloud cover of varying thickness, possibly modulated by planetary-scale waves. However, the long-term, continuous, high-precision monitoring data to test this hypothesis for more objects is lacking. By applying our novel photometric approach to TESS data, we extract a high-precision lightcurve of the closest brown dwarfs, which form the binary system Luhman 16AB. Our observations, that cover about 100 rotations of Luhman 16B, display continuous lightcurve evolution. The periodogram analysis shows that the rotational period of the component that dominates the lightcurve is 5.28 h. We also find evidence for periods of 2.5 h, 6.94 h, and 90.8 h. We show that the 2.5 h and 5.28 h periods emerge from Luhman 16B and that they consist of multiple, slightly shifted peaks, revealing the presence of high-speed jets and zonal circulation in this object. We find that the lightcurve evolution is well fit by the planetary-scale waves model, further supporting this interpretation. We argue that the 6.94 h peak is likely the rotation period of Luhman 16A. By comparing the rotational periods to observed v sin(i) measurements, we show that the two brown dwarfs are viewed at angles close to their equatorial planes. We also describe a long-period (P~91 h) evolution in the lightcurve, which we propose emerges from the vortex-dominated polar regions. Our study paves the way toward direct comparisons of the predictions of global circulation models to observations via periodogram analysis.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2021-Jan-08 at 12:57 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  4. #1744
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    Could we harness energy from black holes? In a study published in the journal Physical Review D, physicists Luca Comisso from Columbia University and Felipe Asenjo from Universidad Adolfo Ibanez in Chile, found a new way to extract energy from black holes by breaking and rejoining magnetic field lines near the event horizon, the point from which nothing, not even light, can escape the black hole's gravitational pull.

    https://phys.org/news/2021-01-harnes...ack-holes.html
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  5. #1745
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    Has a planet of the star Vega finally been detected? It would be a giant planet or brown dwarf if so.

    A decade of radial-velocity monitoring of Vega and new limits on the presence of planets

    Spencer A. Hurt, Samuel N. Quinn, David W. Latham, Andrew Vanderburg, Gilbert A. Esquerdo, Michael L. Calkins, Perry Berlind, Ruth Angus, Christian A. Latham, George Zhou

    We present an analysis of 1524 spectra of Vega spanning 10 years, in which we search for periodic radial velocity variations. A signal with a periodicity of 0.676 days and a semi-amplitude of ~10 m/s is consistent with the rotation period measured over much shorter time spans by previous spectroscopic and spectropolarimetric studies, confirming the presence of surface features on this A0 star. The timescale of evolution of these features can provide insight into the mechanism that sustains the weak magnetic fields in normal A type stars. Modeling the radial velocities with a Gaussian process using a quasi-periodic kernel suggests that the characteristic spot evolution timescale is ~180 days, though we cannot exclude the possibility that it is much longer. Such long timescales may indicate the presence of failed fossil magnetic fields on Vega. TESS data reveal Vega's photometric rotational modulation for the first time, with a total amplitude of only 10 ppm, and a comparison of the spectroscopic and photometric amplitudes suggest the surface features may be dominated by bright plages rather than dark spots. For the shortest orbital periods, transit and radial velocity injection recovery tests exclude the presence of transiting planets larger than 2 Earth radii and most non-transiting giant planets. At long periods, we combine our radial velocities with direct imaging from the literature to produce detection limits for Vegan planets and brown dwarfs out to distances of 15 au. Finally, we detect a candidate radial velocity signal with a period of 2.43 days and a semi-amplitude of 6 m/s. If caused by an orbiting companion, its minimum mass would be ~20 Earth masses; because of Vega's pole-on orientation, this would correspond to a Jovian planet if the orbit is aligned with the stellar spin. We discuss the prospects for confirmation of this candidate planet.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2101.08801
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  6. #1746
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    Everything you've ever wanted to know about Hot Jupiters, and what they're like.

    Hot Jupiters: Origins, Structure, Atmospheres

    Jonathan J. Fortney, Rebekah I. Dawson, Thaddeus D. Komacek

    We provide a brief review of many aspects of the planetary physics of hot Jupiters. Our aim is to cover most of the major areas of current study while providing the reader with additional references for more detailed follow-up. We first discuss giant planet formation and subsequent orbital evolution via disk-driven torques or dynamical interactions. More than one formation pathway is needed to understand the population. Next, we examine our current understanding of the evolutionary history and current interior structure of the planets, where we focus on bulk composition as well as viable models to explain the inflated radii of the population. Finally we discuss aspects of their atmospheres in the context of observations and 1D and 3D models, including atmospheric structure and escape, spectroscopic signatures, and complex atmospheric circulation. The major opacity sources in these atmospheres, including alkali metals, water vapor, and others, are discussed. We discuss physics that control the 3D atmospheric circulation and day-to-night temperature structures. We conclude by suggesting important future work for still-open questions.

    https://arxiv.org/abs/2102.05064
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

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