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Thread: Cassini Discovers Two New Saturn Moons

  1. #1
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    Cassini Discovers Two New Saturn Moons

    The Cassini spacecraft has spied two new little moons around satellite-rich Saturn, NASA said Monday. Saturn's tally of known moons now stands at 33. No names yet.

    Complete story here.

    Hopefully any new moons will be discovered in this fashion, rather than by "close encounters" that are too close.


    [edit/typo]

  2. #2
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    First there were particles in the ring gap, now a moon just sent us careening towards Saturn! What next?!

    EDIT: On a completely unrelated note, I just saw Uranus with binoculars!

  3. #3
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    2 miles in diameter and they're calling them moons? At what size does something go from being a 'moon' to just being a rock or debris?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by TriangleMan
    2 miles in diameter and they're calling them moons? At what size does something go from being a 'moon' to just being a rock or debris?
    Depends whether its aimed at you or not.... :wink:

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TriangleMan
    2 miles in diameter and they're calling them moons? At what size does something go from being a 'moon' to just being a rock or debris?
    Good question. Probably anything that would take out Rhode Island if impacted.

    Should there be various size categories?
    Moonlets, Moonismals,... orbial debris.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TriangleMan
    2 miles in diameter and they're calling them moons? At what size does something go from being a 'moon' to just being a rock or debris?
    I remember this subject coming up before, and it appears that there isn't a classification as to how big or small a moon can be. At least that's what I understood from the thread, there wasn't a definitive answer really.

    Perhaps we'll never know!

  7. #7
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    So far we seem to have:

    Part of a ring system = not a moon
    Not part of a ring system = is a moon

    And when I say "part of a ring system," I mean that the object actually makes up a ring. Shepherd moons are still moons.

    But you've got to think they've got to draw the line someplace, and soon. What happens if (when?) Cassini gets a good enough image of the rings to differentiate individual objects?
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  8. #8
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    Re: Cassini Discovers Two New Saturn Moons

    Quote Originally Posted by George
    Quote Originally Posted by TriangleMan
    2 miles in diameter and they're calling them moons? At what size does something go from being a 'moon' to just being a rock or debris?
    Good question. Probably anything that would take out Rhode Island if impacted.

    Should there be various size categories?
    Moonlets, Moonismals,... orbial debris.
    So anything equal to or bigger than the size of a basketball. Got it! 8)

  9. #9
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    Re: Cassini Discovers Two New Saturn Moons

    Quote Originally Posted by Maksutov
    Quote Originally Posted by George
    Quote Originally Posted by TriangleMan
    2 miles in diameter and they're calling them moons? At what size does something go from being a 'moon' to just being a rock or debris?
    Good question. Probably anything that would take out Rhode Island if impacted.

    Should there be various size categories?
    Moonlets, Moonismals,... orbial debris.
    So anything equal to or bigger than the size of a basketball. Got it! 8)
    Hmmm...what if it is volleyball in size and has an orbiting (slowly) green pea.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  10. #10
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    I suppose free atoms count too. 8-[

  11. #11
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    So where are the discovery images?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK
    So where are the discovery images?
    One set is here.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

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