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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #15451
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    She didn't add this part herself, but I'd also use the same principle to explain the appearance & growth of vegetarianism and other movements for more humane treatment of livestock and scientific efforts to take animals out of our food production entirely with alternatives to milk & meat; the better off we are, the more free we are to expand our spheres of empathy.
    The relationship between vegans and pets is quite complicated, as you might expect. I have a vegan friend who has a "companion animal" (the word "pet" and the concept of "ownership" being problematic in themselves). It's a rescue dog, and her position (which she gives me to understand is quite general among vegans) is that she would not buy an animal that had been specifically bred to be sold as a pet, but that as a vegan she has a duty of care to animals which, through no fault of their own, have ended up living in a world in which they can't survive without human aid. So she's essentially a pet anti-natalist--she would prefer to live in a world in which animals were not bred to be pets, and people didn't own pets, but is trying to make the best of a world in which the concept of "pet animal" exists.

    Maybe I should also point out that my Indian friend is a vegetarian, and raised in a comfortable middle-class home--certainly not "a few notches above death". So while I'm sure some attitudes to pets can be linked to deprivation, I doubt if it applies in his case.

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  2. #15452
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    No worries. We Hutchisons are well used to it.

    Although I have actually posted the correct spelling twenty thousand times.

    Grant Hutchison
    My parents met in Hutchinson, Kansas.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  3. #15453
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    Unanticipated wasps.
    Pulled on a pair of old gardening gloves today and started gathering up fallen leaves that had drifted on to our garden path. After about a minute of this, felt a stabbing pain in the palm of my hand and then my ring finger. Took off glove, nothing much to see. Examined glove for evidence of punctures, nothing to see. Put glove back on again, multiple repeated stabbing pains in same finger. Took glove off again to discover wasp poised on tip of ring finger, still stinging.
    I'm fortunately not allergic to wasp stings, but I must have received about five in the tip of that finger, which is now throbbing like a cartoon finger struck by a mallet.

    Grant Hutchison
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  4. #15454
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    In some societies, though Western ideas of pet ownership do seem to be propagating around the world only slightly slower than McDonald's restaurants. My Indian friends still view pet ownership as one of the weirder aspects of Western culture. One of them told me it feels to him like something out of a fantasy novel: "There's this whole spooky society that's superficially normal, except they keep animals in their houses, expending huge amounts of time and energy and money on them, and treating them like they're part of the family, almost human. You couldn't make it up."

    Grant Hutchison
    Then there was Akbar, Indian mughal, who owned 9000 pet cheetah.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  5. #15455
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Unanticipated wasps.
    Pulled on a pair of old gardening gloves today and started gathering up fallen leaves that had drifted on to our garden path. After about a minute of this, felt a stabbing pain in the palm of my hand and then my ring finger. Took off glove, nothing much to see. Examined glove for evidence of punctures, nothing to see. Put glove back on again, multiple repeated stabbing pains in same finger. Took glove off again to discover wasp poised on tip of ring finger, still stinging.
    I'm fortunately not allergic to wasp stings, but I must have received about five in the tip of that finger, which is now throbbing like a cartoon finger struck by a mallet.

    Grant Hutchison
    InterNational wasps: on our way to Italy, i thought i stabbed myself on a cravat pin in England, but later in Italy the wasp got me again as I unpacked, same wasp, or Vespa, two countries, sorry to hear about the pain.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  6. #15456
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Then there was Akbar, Indian mughal, who owned 9000 pet cheetah.
    Weren't the Mughal cheetahs famously used as hunting animals? The Mughals enjoyed hunting and trapping cheetahs, and then training them to participate in hunting antelopes and other large game.

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  7. #15457
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I am not criticizing anyone's beliefs, but a lot of Westerners think treating cows as sacred animals and letting them roam around is strange. I'll admit that I didn't know Indians think pet ownership is weird.
    I knew about this, but it's one of those things that I don't understand. Are the cows in India somewhat more domesticated than American cows or are the residents more mellow around cows than typical Americans? I'm trying imagine a cow wandering my neighborhood and all I can picture is disaster.

    Off to Google Indian Bovine Habits...
    Solfe

  8. #15458
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Weren't the Mughal cheetahs famously used as hunting animals? The Mughals enjoyed hunting and trapping cheetahs, and then training them to participate in hunting antelopes and other large game.

    Grant Hutchison
    Cheetah were indeed used for hunting in India. But I've also heard about keeping them as pet as a status symbol, even though I cannot get Google results on that. Bit of a moot point since they went extinct in India... But they are being reintroduced.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  9. #15459
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    Last night, in my weekly online script read, we had the long-threatened Anonymous. Yes, the anti-Stratfordian movie from a few years back that posits . . . well, a lot, really. The Earl of Oxford really wrote all of Shakespeare's works; he initially offered them to Ben Jonson, who didn't take them because he didn't read them first and thought they'd be terrible and pushed them off on an obnoxious drunken actor who couldn't write a single letter. The Earl of Oxford was also both Elizabeth I's secret lover and the father of the Earl of Southampton--and her son with [person], which neither of them had known. (One rather suspects that they don't ever say who his father really was because the math doesn't work on that for it to have been any of the people she'd allegedly slept with.) My friends learned a lot about actual Elizabethan history last night, mostly because every once in a while I'd burst out with it. I will say that they were pretty clear on the fact that it didn't make any sense even if you didn't know as much about the subject as I do.
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  10. #15460
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    I knew about this, but it's one of those things that I don't understand. Are the cows in India somewhat more domesticated than American cows or are the residents more mellow around cows than typical Americans? I'm trying imagine a cow wandering my neighborhood and all I can picture is disaster.
    I guess I'd turn that around and ask if cows in the USA are notoriously aggressive towards people.
    People do sometimes get injured by cows in the UK, but the most common causative features are dog-walking, approaching calves, or failing to recognize a cow that's feeling threatened (they turn sideways and tuck their tails in, which isn't a particularly intuitive sign for humans to pick up on). I've driven and walked around cows frequently for forty years with never a hint of a problem, probably because I don't own a dog, go wide and slow around cows with calves, and watch for signs of unease.
    In India, for reasons already discussed, there are far fewer dog walkers, the cows wandering the street are usually beyond reproductive age (otherwise someone would be looking after them and milking them), and everyone sees a lot of cows and knows how to deal with them. The cows are also pretty acclimatized to the noisy chaos of Indian city streets, and so are less likely to be spooked by blaring horns and frantic traffic.

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  11. #15461
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I guess I'd turn that around and ask if cows in the USA are notoriously aggressive towards people.
    No not so much cows, but bulls are a different story. I have been chased by bulls in I guess protection of their herd.
    People do sometimes get injured by cows in the UK, but the most common causative features are dog-walking, approaching calves, or failing to recognize a cow that's feeling threatened (they turn sideways and tuck their tails in, which isn't a particularly intuitive sign for humans to pick up on). I've driven and walked around cows frequently for forty years with never a hint of a problem, probably because I don't own a dog, go wide and slow around cows with calves, and watch for signs of unease.
    In India, for reasons already discussed, there are far fewer dog walkers, the cows wandering the street are usually beyond reproductive age (otherwise someone would be looking after them and milking them), and everyone sees a lot of cows and knows how to deal with them. The cows are also pretty acclimatized to the noisy chaos of Indian city streets, and so are less likely to be spooked by blaring horns and frantic traffic.

    Grant Hutchison
    My experience with cows is a gentle experience, not to say that there are other stories not as kind.

  12. #15462
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    No not so much cows, but bulls are a different story. I have been chased by bulls in I guess protection of their herd.
    Bulls on their own in a field are actually said to be more dangerous than those in a field full of cows. I've never tested the theory, though I have crossed a fair number of fields containing bulls.
    You'll find a fair number of videos on-line of people being attacked by street bulls in India (and even the occasional cow) but given the number of daily encounters, it seems that people and street cattle generally rub along fairly well.
    There are, however, fairly frequent road-traffic accidents (some fatal) because of people trying to avoid hitting a cow. No-one wants to hit a large animal with their car, but of course in India there's the added hazard of being attacked by humans because you've injured the cow.

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  13. #15463
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    I still have nightmares of the traffic I encountered during my visits to India. The cows tended to be the most predictable, aware and sensible road users. I've seen deadly road accidents featuring both human and bovine victims, and it wasn't clear which one was considered worse. I thought my life ended when a taxi driver profusively honked at water buffalo, because I only knew them as the massively dangerous wild animal in Africa; these were domesticated and couldn't care less. After 2 hours into this 5 hour taxi drive I could no longer handle looking through the windshield, so I looked sideways. 1 minute later, elephant zipped by at 30cm. I still have 1 functional heart chamber.

    I regularly have to work in cow fields for my job. Cows can be very curious, quite protective but normally also a bit afraid of humans at close distance, and they rapidly get bored of the new feature in their surroundings. I have not been attacked by bulls, mostly because I avoid the opportunity. I have been attacked by a cow who was just released into the field in spring and a bit over the moon. As it stormed towards me, I let it focus on my hand which I held in front of me. I kept my hand in position and made a big sideways step just as it arrived. Fastest petting stroke ever.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  14. #15464
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    Cows on the road would be unusual here. Its just the deer that are a problem. The deadliest animal in North America.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #15465
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Cows on the road would be unusual here. Its just the deer that are a problem. The deadliest animal in North America.
    I think the humans might have them beat there.
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  16. #15466
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    No not so much cows, but bulls are a different story. I have been chased by bulls in I guess protection of their herd.


    My experience with cows is a gentle experience, not to say that there are other stories not as kind.
    When I had a small farm with a few cows, it was a joy to rent the bull, a little Dexter, for a day. But a neighbouring farmer kept a bigger bull and used a cattle prod to bully it in the yard. One day that farmer forgot his prod, the bull noticed, cornered him and crushed several of his bones. The farmer survived. Cows can be stampeded by dogs or horses, they are afraid of both, and can jump fences or hedges like a horse when motivated. They say never walk between a cow and calf, those maternal instincts are powerful and cows are strong!
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  17. #15467
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Cows on the road would be unusual here.
    You don't encounter them in town or on the trunk roads, but it's something you need to deal with on rural roads in the Highlands and Islands:


    If you peer into the background, you can see that they're somewhat controlled by a fence and a cattle grid, but roam freely back and forth across the road.

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  18. #15468
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    My parents met in Hutchinson, Kansas.
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Unanticipated wasps.
    Pulled on a pair of old gardening gloves today and started gathering up fallen leaves that had drifted on to our garden path. After about a minute of this, felt a stabbing pain in the palm of my hand and then my ring finger. Took off glove, nothing much to see. Examined glove for evidence of punctures, nothing to see. Put glove back on again, multiple repeated stabbing pains in same finger. Took glove off again to discover wasp poised on tip of ring finger, still stinging.
    I'm fortunately not allergic to wasp stings, but I must have received about five in the tip of that finger, which is now throbbing like a cartoon finger struck by a mallet.

    Grant Hutchison
    This isn't a "bugs", this is an "amused", mostly at my weird brain.

    The two quoted posts were sequential, and for one brief moment I thought Grant's "Unanticipated wasps" comment referred to Trebuchet's parents (as in White Anglo-Saxon Protestants - not that I know they are any of those).

    I'll be going now....
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  19. #15469
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    That "WASP" thing always bugged me. Anglo-Saxons are a white people. If you're specifying "Anglo-Saxon", you don't need to add "white". It's like talking about spaghetti pasta, or a guitar musical instrument, or my Chevrolet Colorado truck, or a terrier dog. And it wasn't even needed to make the acronym an acronym; asps are real animals too! (I also don't know why Q got added to LGBT, because I don't know of a relevant definition for Q that isn't already covered by L & G. I suppose the people who decided to add Q figured it meant something different that wasn't already covered, but I haven't seen or heard what that could be.)

  20. #15470
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    <snip>
    (I also don't know why Q got added to LGBT, because I don't know of a relevant definition for Q that isn't already covered by L & G. I suppose the people who decided to add Q figured it meant something different that wasn't already covered, but I haven't seen or heard what that could be.)
    You are correct that the Q (Queer) stands for something this isn't covered by Lesbian or Gay.
    link
    Today, a person might use the term “queer” to describe any sexual orientation or gender identity that is not heterosexual or cisgender. For example, people who are lesbian, gay, asexual, or transgender may identify as queer.

    Some people may also use “queer” because their sexuality or gender may be complicated, change over time, or not fit into any preexisting sexual orientations or gender identities.
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  21. #15471
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    "Queer" is a can of worms: because of its historical pejorative use, because different people use it to mean different things, and because there are resentments between groups who employ different usages.
    It ended up in the LGBTQ sequence because the LGBT bit has a fundamentally binary approach to gender, and those who don't identify as male or female, or identified different ways on different days, found that they couldn't sit comfortably in any of those categories.

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  22. #15472
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    You are correct that the Q (Queer) stands for something this isn't covered by Lesbian or Gay.
    link
    I've read an alternative meaning, in many places, that the Q stands for Questioning. This makes sense to me as it represents those who haven't yet found their place among the other groups.
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  23. #15473
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    This isn't a "bugs", this is an "amused", mostly at my weird brain.

    The two quoted posts were sequential, and for one brief moment I thought Grant's "Unanticipated wasps" comment referred to Trebuchet's parents (as in White Anglo-Saxon Protestants - not that I know they are any of those).

    I'll be going now....
    Well, Dad was half Danish, which is at least close to Saxony!
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  24. #15474
    The file naming system of Arxiv, I wish it was more than just a string of numbers. I know this probably this gives each article a unique file name but I have a bunch of them save for a while and it is hard to know which is which.
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    When my sister started in college, the support group she joined was called the Lesbian-Gay-Bisexual Awareness Group, which abbreviated to LGBAG. Which was unfortunate and hard to pronounce. It just doesn't sound very pleasant. And when a trans woman joined the group, she also didn't feel included under the title. So they changed the group's name to Understanding Sexuality, which abbreviated nicely as "US."
    _____________________________________________
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    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  26. #15476
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    The file naming system of Arxiv, I wish it was more than just a string of numbers. I know this probably this gives each article a unique file name but I have a bunch of them save for a while and it is hard to know which is which.
    PDF? Whenever I decide to keep a paper I've downloaded, I rename it with Year, Author, and as much of the title as the file system will allow.

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    Our house has an old (30 +) fibreglass swimming pool that was put in by the original owners. Yesterday the Salt Water Chlorinator cell failed but that wasn't a problem as it had been on the verge of falling over for several months so I had a new one ready to go. A couple of hours later I went to check that it was all still working to find that the water was not being circulated. It turned out that the pool pump had failed- either a capacitor or a seized motor. The pump is so old (+ 12 years) that it is not worth having it repaired so I am off tomorrow to buy a new one as 'summer is a comin in'. Saturday will be 35C.

    I was going to remove the pool about 3 years ago but the grandkids love it so it will be kept for a few years more until it finally collapses.

  28. #15478
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    I spent loads of time building a transistor amplifier for video signals, only to find it doesn't work. Yet. I've now discovered I forgot 1 (seemingly very important) connection, so I'll try again tomorrow. I have zero educational background in electronics, so it is quite steep for me to build and debug these things. A microcontroller with a pullup resistor and an LED is one thing, but this amplifier is with discrete components and deals with stuff such as signal impedances. And as it all takes place at about 5MHz, I cannot measure my results like I can with DC. Trivial stuff for an electronics guy, but I'm not that guy.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2021-Nov-24 at 10:29 PM.
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  29. #15479
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I spent loads of time building a transistor amplifier for video signals, only to find it doesn't work. Yet. I've now discovered I forgot 1 (seemingly very important) connection, so I'll try again tomorrow. I have zero educational background in electronics, so it is quite steep for me to build and debug these things. A microcontroller with a pullup resistor and an LED is one thing, but this amplifier is with discrete components and deals with stuff such as signal impedances. And as it all takes place at about 5MHz, I cannot measure my results like I can with DC. Trivial stuff for an electronics guy, but I'm not that guy.
    Was it a kit or a circuit from somewhere?
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  30. #15480
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    An old, old circuit. Published in many variants throughout the years. One of the difficulties with those published schematics is that some contain errors, and most assume some surrounding parts such as termination resistors or coupling capacitors that are not included in the schematic. Or some assume connection to a high impedance input, other low impedance..And the accompanying text assumes prior knowledge about video signals/amplifiers and mine is very limited.

    But who knows, it just might work after I add the missing connection. Not tonight though, plenty of other urgent repair work to do before tomorrow.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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