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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #14821
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    NEW-gut.
    Sen-TRIF-you-gull.
    At least that's how they sound when I read them.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  2. #14822
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Sen-TRIF-you-gull.
    I've always heard it as "sen-TRIF-uh-gull". Uh as in that little pronunciation symbol that looks like an upside-down e. I can't remember what it's called which trivially bugs me.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  3. #14823
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    I hear centri fugue al most often but the trif version happens too. Also centri peteal
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  4. #14824
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    I've always heard it as "sen-TRIF-uh-gull". Uh as in that little pronunciation symbol that looks like an upside-down e. I can't remember what it's called which trivially bugs me.
    Schwa.
    Cen-tri-FUGUE-al hereabouts, which follows the etymology. The Oxford English Dictionary allows the TRIF version as well, which is more than I would do. But then, I'm implacably opposed to kil-OM-etre.

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #14825
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Schwa.
    Ah, thank you!
    But then, I'm implacably opposed to kil-OM-etre.
    "Klick".

    (ducks and runs)
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  6. #14826
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    Yep, we do like to pronounce terminal Ts of French origin, don't we? I've also heard some differences in the first syllable. I've think I've heard noo'-ɡət most often. Every once in a while, I hear someone pronounce the second syllable as -gaht.
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  7. #14827
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    But then, I'm implacably opposed to kil-OM-etre.

    Grant Hutchison
    I have yet to see this device that measures thousands.

  8. #14828
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    But then, I'm implacably opposed to kil-OM-etre.

    Grant Hutchison
    Me too, but it seems near universal among English speakers.
    You don't say mil-IM-eter do you?

    In a similar vein, there's a Formula One driver named Sergio Perez. People pronounce it Per-EZ. It's PER-ez. You don't say Mar-tin-EZ or Go-MEZ, do you? No, you don't.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  9. #14829
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    I have yet to see this device that measures thousands.
    If you're confused, blame Noah Webster. It was his idea to replace metre with meter in American English.

    Grant Hutchison

  10. #14830
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Me too, but it seems near universal among English speakers.
    I still say kil-OM-eter because of life-long exposure to the pronunciation. But I do accept KI-lo-ME-ter. If you say clicks, we can have beer and swap stories.

    You don't say mil-IM-eter do you?
    Those a mike-mikes.

    In a similar vein, there's a Formula One driver named Sergio Perez. People pronounce it Per-EZ. It's PER-ez. You don't say Mar-tin-EZ or Go-MEZ, do you? No, you don't.
    Oh, I hope not. Otherwise, I'll be ​lu-NA.
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  11. #14831
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Me too, but it seems near universal among English speakers.
    You don't say mil-IM-eter do you?

    In a similar vein, there's a Formula One driver named Sergio Perez. People pronounce it Per-EZ. It's PER-ez. You don't say Mar-tin-EZ or Go-MEZ, do you? No, you don't.
    Unless you're Les Nessman of WRKP:

    https://youtu.be/q_fq4RQgwuA

  12. #14832
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Me too, but it seems near universal among English speakers.
    You don't say mil-IM-eter do you?
    Or kil-OG-ram.

  13. #14833
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    kil-EM-all.

    No, wait...that was in a movie or something.
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  14. #14834
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    It was some time before I realized that other Americans pronounced “catenary” as “CAT uh nary.” I had a mechanics professor of British origin, and learned it as “KUH tenary”
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  15. #14835
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    I normally delight in UK pronunciations but there is one that rubs me the wrong way for some reason. It's when they say, conTROversy. IIUC, this is something that has caught on over recent years and I wonder why. Do they also say, conTROvert?
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  16. #14836
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    It was some time before I realized that other Americans pronounced “catenary” as “CAT uh nary.” I had a mechanics professor of British origin, and learned it as “KUH tenary”
    Kuh-TEE-nuh-ray is the standard British pronunciation. The American pronunciation always makes me think about cats and canaries.

    Grant Hutchison

  17. #14837
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    I normally delight in UK pronunciations but there is one that rubs me the wrong way for some reason. It's when they say, conTROversy. IIUC, this is something that has caught on over recent years and I wonder why.
    I wonder why, too. Amusingly, people write furious letters to the British newspapers when they hear it used on the BBC, and they almost always blame it on the influence of American English, in the teeth of the evidence.
    (Of course, some Brits blame every newly encountered pronunciation or variant spelling on American English.)

    Grant Hutchison

  18. #14838
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    (Of course, some Brits blame every newly encountered pronunciation or variant spelling on American English.)
    Heh...we're used to it.
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  19. #14839
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    Click image for larger version. 

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  20. #14840
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I wonder why, too. Amusingly, people write furious letters to the British newspapers when they hear it used on the BBC, and they almost always blame it on the influence of American English, in the teeth of the evidence.
    (Of course, some Brits blame every newly encountered pronunciation or variant spelling on American English.)

    Grant Hutchison
    And then there's New Zealand. Weird vowels. I probably shouldn't link to the NZ deck sealer video.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #14841
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I wonder why, too. Amusingly, people write furious letters to the British newspapers when they hear it used on the BBC, and they almost always blame it on the influence of American English, in the teeth of the evidence.
    (Of course, some Brits blame every newly encountered pronunciation or variant spelling on American English.)

    Grant Hutchison
    But it is so appropriate that pronouncing controversy should be controversial. .
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  22. #14842
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    But it is so appropriate that pronouncing controversy should be controversial. .
    Do Brits pronounce that con-TROV-er-si-al?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  23. #14843
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Schwa.
    Cen-tri-FUGUE-al hereabouts, which follows the etymology. The Oxford English Dictionary allows the TRIF version as well, which is more than I would do. But then, I'm implacably opposed to kil-OM-etre.

    Grant Hutchison
    I personally went with the fugue, but I wasn't really sure and when I looked it up I found the trif and then I wasn't sure at all.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  24. #14844
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    It was some time before I realized that other Americans pronounced “catenary” as “CAT uh nary.” I had a mechanics professor of British origin, and learned it as “KUH tenary”
    I have actually never said the word out loud, in part because I had no reason to and in part because I wasn't sure how to pronounce it.
    _____________________________________________
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  25. #14845
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    I've heard "KATEuhnary" and "catTENnary" from non-natives and still don't know how to pronounce it. It also reminds me too much of the imperfections of the brain. At this moment, all I know about them is something something sinh cosh and that a lot of catenary problems involve nonlinear math. Some years ago, I knew enough about them to derive a textbook formula (which I needed to program a visualisation software for a bucket chain dredger) AND I found and corrected an error in the formula of said textbook in the process.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  26. #14846
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    And then there's New Zealand. Weird vowels.
    Consistent, though. They've all edged a little higher in the mouth until the top vowel fell off and ended up at the bottom. So it's "ket" for "cat", "ixcellent" for "excellent" and then "fush" for "fish".
    Something similar happened to long vowels in English during the fifteenth to eighteenth century, called the Great Vowel Shift.

    Grant Hutchison

  27. #14847
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    And when the heck did aluminum pick up an extra "i"? Or did North Americans drop it to save space?

    aluminium

    vs.

    aluminum

  28. #14848
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    And when the heck did aluminum pick up an extra "i"? Or did North Americans drop it to save space?

    aluminium

    vs.

    aluminum
    The confusion dates back to its discovery by Sir David Humphry and we can playfully blame him for it. He initially suggested alumium, then changed it to aluminum, before finally settling on aluminium. We didn't get the final e-mail notice here in the US, so aluminum made its way into dictionaries. Oddly enough, Canada followed suit...at which point, I don't know...while aluminium was adopted by the UK and other English-speaking countries.
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  29. #14849
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    Both names came from an English chemist, but different ones became popular in different places, and even that wasn’t resolved for a long time because aluminum was very hard and expensive to produce for a long time, so was rarely encountered, so few had reason to use the word.

    From http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/aluminium.htm

    The metal was named by the English chemist Sir Humphry Davy (who, you may recall, “abominated gravy, and lived in the odium of having discovered sodium”), even though he was unable to isolate it: that took another two decades’ work by others.
    […]
    Sir Humphry made a bit of a mess of naming this new element, at first spelling it alumium (this was in 1807) then changing it to aluminum, and finally settling on aluminium in 1812.
    […]
    The spelling in –um continued in occasional use in Britain for a while, though that in –ium soon predominated. In the USA, the position was more complicated. Noah Webster’s Dictionary of 1828 has only aluminum, though the standard spelling among US chemists throughout most of the nineteenth century was aluminium; it was the preferred version in The Century Dictionary of 1889 and is the only spelling given in the Webster Unabridged Dictionary of 1913.

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  30. #14850
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    Urgh, ninja’d.

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