Page 421 of 434 FirstFirst ... 321371411419420421422423431 ... LastLast
Results 12,601 to 12,630 of 13007

Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #12601
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,084
    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    I live in a semi-detached house, which is for some reason "10", while next door is "10A". (I'd expect "10A" and "10B".)

    But soooo many people see "10" and assume it must really be "10A" (presumably they think next door must be "10B". Just had yet another person come to the door and get quite surprised to see me.
    I understand that it can be annoying, but I think that's fairly common. In France they use the word "bis" for the second one in that case. I think basically when you have sequential numbering for lots, if a lot ends up being split it's often hard to ask the original owner of 1 Elm Street to make it 1A, because then they have to change all the registrations and stuff. So it's most common to just give A to the second one, and it's sort of like using "prime" with numbers.
    As above, so below

  2. #12602
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    11,034
    That's interesting on "bis" - my experience of that word is only in relation to certain WWII French tanks.

    My trivial issue here is mainly with the obliviousness of visitors and deliverers.

    My letterbox is clearly marked "10", next door is clearly marked "10A", regardless of what would be common numbering - how do professional couriers keep leaving boxes marked "10A" at my door?




    (Edit: NB: again, this isn't really the point, but the house being semi-detached means it was built at the same time as next door - they share a wall. Here, it'd be fairly common for them to then be 10A and 10B right from the start. Obviously with in-fill housing it's awkward to change the numbering of the previously existing house. But regardless of the numbering, the numbers are clearly marked, and ...)
    Last edited by pzkpfw; 2020-Feb-03 at 05:39 AM.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  3. #12603
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    49,553
    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    That's interesting on "bis" - my experience of that word is only in relation to certain WWII French tanks.

    My trivial issue here is mainly with the obliviousness of visitors and deliverers.

    My letterbox is clearly marked "10", next door is clearly marked "10A", regardless of what would be common numbering - how do professional couriers keep leaving boxes marked "10A" at my door?




    (Edit: NB: again, this isn't really the point, but the house being semi-detached means it was built at the same time as next door - they share a wall. Here, it'd be fairly common for them to then be 10A and 10B right from the start. Obviously with in-fill housing it's awkward to change the numbering of the previously existing house. But regardless of the numbering, the numbers are clearly marked, and ...)
    Maybe should should label your letterbox 10 (blank) or 10 (not A)?
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  4. #12604
    I have almost recovered from Saturday, could be worse the other guy who moves furniture for the auction company needs back surgery from almost 25 years of doing the job, it is diffently a job for younger people.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  5. #12605
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    11,034
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Maybe should should label your letterbox 10 (blank) or 10 (not A)?
    ... yes, I've considered putting a struck-out "A" on it!
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  6. #12606
    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    ... yes, I've considered putting a struck-out "A" on it!
    This is reminding me of this...
    https://youtu.be/X_Q0Hbd0z8Q
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  7. #12607
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,816
    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    ... yes, I've considered putting a struck-out "A" on it!
    Why not just call yourself 10B?

    Grant Hutchison

  8. #12608
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    11,034
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Why not just call yourself 10B?

    Grant Hutchison
    Rented house, not really my call. And if I stuck a "B" on the letterbox it'd have to apply to all mail and deliveries or there'd be awkwardness - so lots of things to change. Also, it wouldn't a be a legal address unless put through the council.

    I'd just like mail addressed to "10" to go to "10", and mail addressed to "10A" to go to "10A". Should be simple.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  9. #12609
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,140
    Troubleshooting.
    I had a 40 year career as an Aerospace/Mechanical Engineer. (That's actually what it says on my diploma.) A major aspect of the job, from the first to the last, was troubleshooting. Figuring out what went wrong. Over the years, I got very good at it. Rule One: Change just one thing at a time.
    So this morning, I was in the bathroom and heard a loud blast of white noise from my wife's TV in the bedroom. By the time I got in there she'd already taken the first two steps: Change the channel, and turning it off and back on. No joy.
    Okay, I'm going to be troubleshooting this morning instead of going to the gym.
    Step 1: What could be the problem?
    1A: The TV has failed.
    1B: The cable box has failed.
    1C: The HDMI cable has failed.
    1D: The HDMI socket on one or the other has failed.
    Step 2: Turn on the other TV, see if it's coming from the cable company. No, that one's fine.
    Step 3: Unplug the HDMI from the TV: All sound goes away. Ok, TV not totally failed. Plug back in, noise returns.
    Step 4: Bring in the spare TV from the garage. Glad I didn't take it to the storage unit yet! But wait, there's something I didn't try!
    Step 4A: Turn on the Blu-Ray player. Switch TV source to HDMI2. No noise. Further exoneration of the TV itself.
    Step 5, the original step 4: Plug in old TV. Remove HDMI cable from the better one, plug into the spare one. Turn on. No noise. Hmmm. Maybe it's the HDMI socket on the main TV.
    Step 6: Plug HDMI cable into HDMI4 on the main TV. Success! No noise! HDMI1 socket on the TV has failed!
    Step 7: Just for grins and confirmation of my troubleshooting prowess, plug cable back into HDMI1. No noise.
    Step 8: Beats the heck out of me what was the problem!

  10. #12610
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,074
    HDMI is a strange beast, involving a fair amount of handshaking between devices.

    We had a TV with only one HDMI input, so I purchased an HDMI switch so we could connect to the cable box and Apple TV thingy.
    Switching to the Apple box always worked. Switching to the cable box always required turning the TV off and back on again.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  11. #12611
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Clear Lake City, TX
    Posts
    12,855
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Troubleshooting.
    I had a 40 year career as an Aerospace/Mechanical Engineer. (That's actually what it says on my diploma.) A major aspect of the job, from the first to the last, was troubleshooting. Figuring out what went wrong. Over the years, I got very good at it. …
    Step 7: Just for grins and confirmation of my troubleshooting prowess, plug cable back into HDMI1. No noise. (AKA, problem self-corrects.)
    Step 8: Beats the heck out of me what was the problem!
    I thought you said you were an engineer? Murphy, baby!

    (Oh, I must add … I was in the chemical engineering department in college. We had an aerospace engineering department, too. One year the entire aerospace industry went south. The aerospace grads were offered the option of a degree in general engineering. Many took it.)
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

    Moderation will be in purple.
    Rules for Posting to This Board

  12. #12612
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    49,553
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    A major aspect of the job, from the first to the last, was troubleshooting. Figuring out what went wrong.
    No different in industrial chemistry; that's at least half my job (the other half being finding new things to break... I mean coming up with new products and formulations).

    I haven't YET run into HDMI problems at home, but they are frequent at work. All of our conference rooms have big flat panel displays that you can hook your laptop to, either wirelessly or with an HDMI cable. All are supposedly set up the same. And each one seems to behave differently.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  13. #12613
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,140
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I thought you said you were an engineer? Murphy, baby!

    (Oh, I must add … I was in the chemical engineering department in college. We had an aerospace engineering department, too. One year the entire aerospace industry went south. The aerospace grads were offered the option of a degree in general engineering. Many took it.)
    I'm a MECHANICAL engineer. I like problems with things I can SEE!

    Intermittent problems are the worst!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #12614
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    4,291
    I like engineers. I wave at them and they blow the train horn. It's so cool to have all these engineers here!
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  15. #12615
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,140
    I've long said I went to engineering schools because I thought I'd learn to drive a train!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #12616
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,138
    Our TV routinely emits a burst of white noise and static a minute or so after it turns on. Don't know what causes it; don't know how to stop it. It's probably a problem with the TV itself.

    Yesterday, I found out that our mailman no longer puts slips of paper in our mailbox with a notice that we have a package. This is because "everything is digital these days." Except I've had multiple packages in the last few months that didn't have tracking numbers on them, because the company I ordered from didn't give me one. And of course there's gifts--they may come with tracking numbers, but do I have them?
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  17. #12617
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,074
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Yesterday, I found out that our mailman no longer puts slips of paper in our mailbox with a notice that we have a package.
    A phone call to your local postmaster should remedy this situation.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  18. #12618
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,074
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I've long said I went to engineering schools because I thought I'd learn to drive a train!
    My (small) Electronics Engineering graduating class purchased train engineer caps and donned them during the graduation ceremony. I still have the hat (and diploma).



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  19. #12619
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Clear Lake City, TX
    Posts
    12,855
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    … Yesterday, I found out that our mailman no longer puts slips of paper in our mailbox with a notice that we have a package. This is because "everything is digital these days." Except I've had multiple packages in the last few months that didn't have tracking numbers on them, because the company I ordered from didn't give me one. And of course there's gifts--they may come with tracking numbers, but do I have them?
    You should be able to go online and sign up for Informed Delivery. The USPS* will send you emails and/or texts when there is a package headed your way, even if you don't have the tracking number. Also you can get an emailed picture digest of what USPS is delivering that day; this will mention packages that can't be photo'd.

    *And FedEx and UPS if you sign up through their websites.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

    Moderation will be in purple.
    Rules for Posting to This Board

  20. #12620
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,090
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm a MECHANICAL engineer. I like problems with things I can SEE!

    Intermittent problems are the worst!
    I maintained avionic sensors on USAF fighters for 12 years. One of our standard troubleshooting steps for persistent problems was to dis/reconnect plugs. The process often called for colorful adjectives to be hurled into the wind with hope they'd reach the ears of the engineers.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  21. #12621
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    18,816
    There were several frustrating things about troubleshooting malfunctioning humans. Bad design, poor service history and lack of spare parts were always problems - but it would have been nice if we could have tried unplugging components one at a time to see what happened.

    Grant Hutchison

  22. #12622
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,022
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    There were several frustrating things about troubleshooting malfunctioning humans. Bad design, poor service history and lack of spare parts were always problems - but it would have been nice if we could have tried unplugging components one at a time to see what happened.

    Grant Hutchison
    Well the unplugging would be easy enough I suppose. But replacing the suspect component...

  23. #12623
    Once and in a while I could use a good hard reboot.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  24. #12624
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,074
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    There were several frustrating things about troubleshooting malfunctioning humans. Bad design, poor service history and lack of spare parts were always problems - but it would have been nice if we could have tried unplugging components one at a time to see what happened.

    Grant Hutchison
    This reminds me of a M*A*S*H episode where Hawkeye was depressed over losing a patient when the Psychiatrist says that he “loses one”, he loses a mind.

    Father Mulchay then points out that when he loses one, he loses a soul.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  25. #12625
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    18,694
    Definitely a first world problem, but who in their right mind designs tiny, black TV remote controls? They can easily fall behind or under couches, chairs, beds, pillows, or anything else, and are almost impossible to find. Too many times I have resorted to a major search, moving things around and peering all over with flashlight in hand just to find a stupid remote.

    Remotes should be reasonably large and light colored - shiny metallic seems best, but other light colors will do. That also gives them room to have a decent number of buttons - the minimalist desings also leave off important functionality.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  26. #12626
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,140
    And all the buttons are in different places. And the remote codes! Sometimes a dozen of them for the same brand!
    When I'm king of the world, there'll be just one remote for everything. Either that or you'll have to get up and turn a knob.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #12627
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Definitely a first world problem, but who in their right mind designs tiny, black TV remote controls? They can easily fall behind or under couches, chairs, beds, pillows, or anything else, and are almost impossible to find. Too many times I have resorted to a major search, moving things around and peering all over with flashlight in hand just to find a stupid remote.

    Remotes should be reasonably large and light colored - shiny metallic seems best, but other light colors will do. That also gives them room to have a decent number of buttons - the minimalist desings also leave off important functionality.
    On Sunday, I knocked my brother's video game controller off the couch by accident and the back fell off (small piece of black plastic that held the batteries in place). We've been looking for it all week and we still haven't found it.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  28. #12628
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    5,965
    I'd swear that some handheld controllers are aerodynamically designed so that they will reliably skip off under a couch instead of staying where they strike the floor.

  29. #12629
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    15,140
    Shane the Yard Guy left his trailer at the top of my lower driveway. On Monday, or maybe Tuesday. It's Thursday and it's still there.
    Background: I used to have a driveway that all the way from one street to the other on the north side of my double lot. But The new house got in the way on the upper side, so now there's just the lower driveway to the old garage.
    He's parked it carefully so I could, if I need to, get my truck out. Which I won't. And it hasn't been run since the end of September when I came back from hurling pumpkins and may not even start. But that's not the point....
    HE DIDN'T ASK! He's usually really good about that kind of thing, and if he had I've had no problem with it. But he didn't ask.

    I'm trying to resist the temptation to send a snarky text.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  30. #12630
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    49,553
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    There were several frustrating things about troubleshooting malfunctioning humans. Bad design, poor service history and lack of spare parts were always problems - but it would have been nice if we could have tried unplugging components one at a time to see what happened.

    Grant Hutchison


    Not to mention they don't come with an instruction manual.

    Actually, you COULD try unplugging one component at a time to see what happens, but I think that would not have been an effective troubleshooting technique.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

Similar Threads

  1. Trivial coincidences from everyday life.
    By Buttercup in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 171
    Last Post: 2012-Nov-02, 09:08 PM
  2. Trivial Relief:
    By Moose in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 2006-Jul-19, 01:20 PM
  3. Bad Astronomy in Trivial Pursuit, Genus 5 Edition
    By tracer in forum Small Media at Large
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 2005-May-12, 01:52 PM
  4. Trivial lawsuits are stupid, but listen to my story...
    By Brady Yoon in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 2005-Apr-29, 01:44 PM
  5. Trivial lawsuits are stupid, but listen to my story...
    By Brady Yoon in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 2005-Apr-28, 01:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •