Page 477 of 488 FirstFirst ... 377427467475476477478479487 ... LastLast
Results 14,281 to 14,310 of 14613

Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #14281
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,563
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I was going to ask for help because I just wasn't seeing it. Then I saw the fat sides of the A's and U's moving around. Is that it?
    Yes. In these lovely Baskerville-derived typefaces, the hairline strokes are aesthetically important. Whoever hung the big individual red plastic letters at the top obviously gave no thought to which way round the superficially symmetrical (but actually deliberately asymmetrical) "A" and "U" should go--they just picked them out of the box and whacked them up. So the "A" and "U" in "BAGUETTE" are mirror-reversed. It would be a visual abomination even if correctly orientated letters weren't available to highlight the error.

    Grant Hutchison

  2. #14282
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Clear Lake City, TX
    Posts
    13,116
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I was going to ask for help because I just wasn't seeing it. Then I saw the fat sides of the A's and U's moving around. Is that it?
    The window has them right.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

    Moderation will be in purple.
    Rules for Posting to This Board

  3. #14283
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,571
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    The window has them right.
    I’m confused. Are the skinny parts of the letters A and U supposed to be on the same side?
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  4. #14284
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,563
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I’m confused. Are the skinny parts of the letters A and U supposed to be on the same side?
    Opposite sides. The diagonal lines of the letters are called strokes, and the thin ones are called hairline strokes. They are used when a letter has two strokes sloping in opposite directions, and the hairline is always directed bottom-left to top-right; the arms of the capital U take their form from the strokes of the V. You can see how the whole alphabet looks in Baskerville, here. (The typeface in the sign isn't Baskerville--among other things, the G has a very prominent, and to my eye rather clumsy looking, spur. In fact, two different styles of spur, if you compare the top sign with the window lettering. But it's certainly a transitional typeface derived from Baskerville.)
    Typefaces are supposed to have a uniform appearance, and if you start putting hairlines in at random, the whole appearance becomes jarringly inconsistent.

    My friend Brian, had he lived to see this, would have gone into the shop and offered to fix their sign for them for free, "Just to get the damn thing off the street."

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #14285
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,571
    We finally had a nice enough day to take my bicycle out, and my rear derailleur cable snapped.
    I’ve been riding the bike on my indoor trainer all winter, but the cable decided to wait until I was several miles (and hills) from home before snapping.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  6. #14286
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,571
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Opposite sides. The diagonal lines of the letters are called strokes, and the thin ones are called hairline strokes. They are used when a letter has two strokes sloping in opposite directions, and the hairline is always directed bottom-left to top-right; the arms of the capital U take their form from the strokes of the V. You can see how the whole alphabet looks in Baskerville, here. (The typeface in the sign isn't Baskerville--among other things, the G has a very prominent, and to my eye rather clumsy looking, spur. In fact, two different styles of spur, if you compare the top sign with the window lettering. But it's certainly a transitional typeface derived from Baskerville.)
    Typefaces are supposed to have a uniform appearance, and if you start putting hairlines in at random, the whole appearance becomes jarringly inconsistent.

    My friend Brian, had he lived to see this, would have gone into the shop and offered to fix their sign for them for free, "Just to get the damn thing off the street."

    Grant Hutchison
    Hmm... I learned something today. Thanks for the explanation.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  7. #14287
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North Tonawanda, NY
    Posts
    3,941
    Constant mechanical problems are part of what took me away form biking years & years ago. And most of it is from the transmissions, particularly the rear one, which I'd be happy without anyway, but bike makers refuse to make one without it.

  8. #14288
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,571
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    Constant mechanical problems are part of what took me away form biking years & years ago. And most of it is from the transmissions, particularly the rear one, which I'd be happy without anyway, but bike makers refuse to make one without it.
    If you are truly a minimalist, you can get a “fixie”. There is only one gear ratio, and if the wheels are moving, so are the pedals.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  9. #14289
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    394
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    Constant mechanical problems are part of what took me away form biking years & years ago. And most of it is from the transmissions, particularly the rear one, which I'd be happy without anyway, but bike makers refuse to make one without it.
    There are plenty of single-gear bicycles here. The shop tried to sell me one, without success.

    I certainly wouldn't want one in a hilly country. This is a very non-hilly country, and I still use most or all of the sixteen gears I have.
    So . . . does this look as bad as it looks?

  10. #14290
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    9,746
    Quote Originally Posted by 21st Century Schizoid Man View Post
    There are plenty of single-gear bicycles here. The shop tried to sell me one, without success.

    I certainly wouldn't want one in a hilly country. This is a very non-hilly country, and I still use most or all of the sixteen gears I have.
    There are bikes with not only one fast pedalling gear but no freewheel either. The idea is you pedal all the time including using your legs as brakes. My son had one and was very keen on it until it was stolen, apparently a common problem with the type as they fetch a higher price than geared bikes. They tend to be very light weight too, minimal in every way.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  11. #14291
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    3,190
    I don't think I'd ride a bicycle without derailleurs. I don't keep up with the most recent developments in the technology, but I must say I'm impressed by the precision of indexed shifters these days. On one of my bicycles, no intermediate positions need to be used for the front derailleur to avoid chain rubbing when a change is made to a rear position, and it has three front sprockets and nine cogs in the back. And if there's a sudden change in grade when I'm really having to apply power, I can drop two gears very quickly with a single long motion on the lever. It just has to be cleaned regularly and the cable periodically tweaked to work well.

  12. #14292
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,480
    Someone mentioned the Dongfang Hour podcast to me. I thought they said "Doomfang Hour" and thought it was a gaming themed podcast. I couldn't find it. Today, I noticed Selvaarchi's thread which explains what it is. I feel kind of dumb.
    Solfe

  13. #14293
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,845
    Ford sent me a recall notice on my pickup. For the airbags. Which have already been replaced twice.
    The only thing keeping it from being non-trivial is that it only applies if they've been deployed in a crash and been replaced. Mine haven't.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  14. #14294
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,480
    I was walking into work and tripped near the door. The person behind me also tripped and I got a lukewarm coffee down my back. I also managed to blow a button off. That was 3 weeks ago. I've had the shirt sitting near my desk waiting for a new button. I finally got around to putting the button on only to realize that the whole back of the shirt was stained a light coffee tan. Seriously, my attention to detail leaves something to be desired.
    Solfe

  15. #14295
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,811
    I've actually been experimenting with deliberate dyeing using materials around the house, and I should try coffee for a project I've got a bit down the line. I suspect I'll get a darker brown out of that than tea provides most of the time. Though right now, I've got nine packets of blue raspberry lemonade Kool-Aid to use.

    Last night, I dreamed I threw up; I might have actually thrown up a little, because I woke up in the middle of the night tasting it, and my throat still feels unpleasant this morning.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  16. #14296
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    9,746
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    I've actually been experimenting with deliberate dyeing using materials around the house, and I should try coffee for a project I've got a bit down the line. I suspect I'll get a darker brown out of that than tea provides most of the time. Though right now, I've got nine packets of blue raspberry lemonade Kool-Aid to use.

    .
    When I did dying for school plays, tea is self fixing but coffee needs a mordant like Alum if you have any. I heard vinegar or vitamin C also works but I used alum. Instant is just as good as brewed and even easier to make concentrated.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  17. #14297
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,794
    Turmeric works for dying wool yellow, but it will turn everything else it touches yellow, too. Oscar Wilde would probably say it was harder to not make turmeric dye.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  18. #14298
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,792
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    There are bikes with not only one fast pedalling gear but no freewheel either. The idea is you pedal all the time including using your legs as brakes.
    My recollection is that when I was a kid, all or at least most kids’ bikes were that way. In fact I got into an accident once when I was visiting Europe because I instinctively tried to backpedal to stop and the bicycle didn’t stop. Nothing serious, just banged lightly into a car, but it was still scary.
    As above, so below

  19. #14299
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,571
    Most bikes had coaster brakes when I was a kid. Pushing the pedals backward would cause braking, but you couldn’t actually pedal backward.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  20. #14300
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,635
    My bikes as a kid were also 'back pedal' brakes. When my wife rode her new E-Bike last year her first longish ride resulted in a, very, minor collision with a wooden light pole because she reverted to her childhood habits and tried to use her pedals to brake.

  21. #14301
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,792
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Most bikes had coaster brakes when I was a kid. Pushing the pedals backward would cause braking, but you couldn’t actually pedal backward.
    Yeah, that's what I meant. I didn't mean you could pedal backwards. The only bikes I remember that can do that are unicyles.
    As above, so below

  22. #14302
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    9,746
    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Yeah, that's what I meant. I didn't mean you could pedal backwards. The only bikes I remember that can do that are unicyles.
    The fixed gear type are still used in track racing but some cyclists use them on the road. Apparently you train to pedal very fast to maximise power and endurance. The backward pedal drum brake is really nice although harder to service, you see a lot of those in the Netherlands. But now we see disc brakes with hydraulic pipes. And bike prices have gone up with the technology! I electrified my bike and it is a delight. The motor offsets the extra weight for uphill and is not needed on the flat or downhill.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  23. #14303
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,635
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    The fixed gear type are still used in track racing but some cyclists use them on the road. Apparently you train to pedal very fast to maximise power and endurance. The backward pedal drum brake is really nice although harder to service, you see a lot of those in the Netherlands. But now we see disc brakes with hydraulic pipes. And bike prices have gone up with the technology! I electrified my bike and it is a delight. The motor offsets the extra weight for uphill and is not needed on the flat or downhill.
    Yes my 1 year old bike has the Hydraulic Disc brakes and I find them very good. I also had it electrified and mostly find it enjoyable. However, I am thinking of getting my old bike back into working order - it has some broken spokes and the rear brakes need to be replaced - the whole works not just the pads. The idea is to make me work a bit harder on some of our rides.

  24. #14304
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,563
    People keep coming up with new Covid-related stock photographs to annoy me. For a while it was pictures of people fiddling with their facemasks, often using gloved hands; then it was people miming vaccination, often holding a syringe full of air loaded with the wrong kind of needle, aimed at the wrong part of the arm. The latest provocation is this one:
    https://static.dw.com/image/56931482_303.jpg
    Because, yeah, we always tap the sterile needle against the outside of the non-sterile vial.

    Grant Hutchison

  25. #14305
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,811
    I get a crossword puzzle delivered to my inbox every Sunday. This week, one of the clues is about the location of a famous scene from When Harry Met Sally. The answer is "diner." And Ross Trudeau claims to be a New Yorker!
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  26. #14306
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,845
    I've gotten quite used to crossword clues being pretty much outright stupid. And have learned they REALLY like vowels. "Aloe" and "Aria" show up all the time. Then there was "Large deer", for which the answer was "elks".
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #14307
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    8,989
    I had one recently where the clue was "Take-home amount" and the answer was "gross".
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  28. #14308
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    85
    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    I had one recently where the clue was "Take-home amount" and the answer was "gross".
    Depends on which definition of "gross" you use.

  29. #14309
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,129
    Quote Originally Posted by kpatz View Post
    Depends on which definition of "gross" you use.
    When I was able to work my take-home pay was usually pretty gross.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  30. #14310
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    14,792
    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    I had one recently where the clue was "Take-home amount" and the answer was "gross".
    Yeah, it’s weird because the amount you get to keep should be “net”. But as others have pointed out, if you define gross as “disgusting” it kind of works.
    As above, so below

Similar Threads

  1. Trivial coincidences from everyday life.
    By Buttercup in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 171
    Last Post: 2012-Nov-02, 09:08 PM
  2. Trivial Relief:
    By Moose in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 2006-Jul-19, 01:20 PM
  3. Bad Astronomy in Trivial Pursuit, Genus 5 Edition
    By tracer in forum Small Media at Large
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 2005-May-12, 01:52 PM
  4. Trivial lawsuits are stupid, but listen to my story...
    By Brady Yoon in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 2005-Apr-29, 01:44 PM
  5. Trivial lawsuits are stupid, but listen to my story...
    By Brady Yoon in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 2005-Apr-28, 01:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •