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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #14791
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    The ATM Machine being the one where you enter your PIN Number.

    In other news, Cracked.com has gone seriously downhill but I still click on it anyhow. I just saw an article in which they referred to Jamie Hyneman of Mythbusters as "she". I hope ironically, but it didn't seem like it.
    I had also noticed the precipitous decline in quality, that was always a bit ropey anyway, lately. It seems to have become more like one of those "10 things that ---" sites that proliferate on the Internet rather than a site with any real pretensions of humour - or humor I guess as it is US based. The comments section were often more interesting than the 'articles' until it stopped running them.

  2. #14792
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Indeed! And there's probably parking adjacent to the lake.
    "Hi! I'm calling you from the Park Lake Park Lake Parking Lot."
    Actually, there are two parking lots, one near the lake and other not. So the Park Lake Park Lake Parking Lot and the Park Lake Park Lake Lake Parking Lot.
    As above, so below

  3. #14793
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    You have to be careful there, the Park Lake Park Lake Parking Lot is on a slight incline. So make sure to put it in park.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  4. #14794
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I just saw an article in which they referred to Jamie Hyneman of Mythbusters as "she".
    These days you never know. A personal pronoun is a slippery thing.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  5. #14795
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    It was a source of bemusement here in Scotland when Jamie suddenly became a popular name for American girls back in the '70s. No-one here was actually named Jamie, and certainly not girls. It was an affectionate nickname for people named James, but it had a bit of an unfashionable country-bumpkin air to it.

    Grant Hutchison

  6. #14796
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    You have to be careful there, the Park Lake Park Lake Parking Lot is on a slight incline. So make sure to put it in park.
    I read a great review of it online by a Korean tourist, Mr. Lake Park. Lake Park give four stars to Park Lake Park Lake Parking Lot.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  7. #14797
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    In other news, Cracked.com has gone seriously downhill but I still click on it anyhow. I just saw an article in which they referred to Jamie Hyneman of Mythbusters as "she". I hope ironically, but it didn't seem like it.
    No, I'm pretty sure it's a joke about people not knowing who he is and assuming he's a younger woman because of the name.
    _____________________________________________
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    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

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  8. #14798
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    It was a source of bemusement here in Scotland when Jamie suddenly became a popular name for American girls back in the '70s. No-one here was actually named Jamie, and certainly not girls. It was an affectionate nickname for people named James, but it had a bit of an unfashionable country-bumpkin air to it.

    Grant Hutchison
    Would it have been a usual nickname in the 18th century, where a Doctor Who companion Jamie originated?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  9. #14799
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Would it have been a usual nickname in the 18th century, where a Doctor Who companion Jamie originated?
    Yes. The last court jester in Scotland, who live during the eighteenth century, is usually called "Jamie Fleeman", although his given name was James Fleming.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Jun-14 at 04:09 PM.

  10. #14800
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    "Jamie Sommers" was the main character of the popular US show The Bionic Woman.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  11. #14801
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    My daughter's name is Jaime. Although the spelling is more popularly considered male, we took it from the French, J'aime​.
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  12. #14802
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    "Jamie Sommers" was the main character of the popular US show The Bionic Woman.
    She was a Jaime. (I know this because a friend at school insisted on pronouncing it high-me, with a Spanish fricative "h".)

    Grant Hutchison

  13. #14803
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    My daughter's name is Jaime. Although the spelling is more popularly considered male, we took it from the French, J'aime​.
    In terms of spelling, yes, but phonetically, "Jaime" and "j'aime" are nothing alike. Phonetically, "jamie" in French is "j'ai mis" or "I have put". And I don't know if I'm fun at parties; I'm never invited.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  14. #14804
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    In terms of spelling, yes, but phonetically, "Jaime" and "j'aime" are nothing alike. Phonetically, "jamie" in French is "j'ai mis" or "I have put". And I don't know if I'm fun at parties; I'm never invited.
    Bien sur...but we took it only from the spelling. If we had been keen on approximating the pronunciation, we might've just named her Gem...or if we'd been prescient, Jem. She was a fan of the cartoon, Jem and the Holograms during the mid-to-late '80s.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  15. #14805
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    It was recently discovered that another designer at work made two mistakes in their design. To accommodate these “features”, I have to make changes to my interfacing design. In addition to identifying an engineering fix, this has resulted in several days worth of bureaucratic paperwork for several people, culminating in my having to defend the changes in real-time to a review board.

    What bugs me is that none of this work will be done by the person who caused it.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  16. #14806
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    My financial cuffing application (work) is acting up again. It's been one thing or another for 13 years with this thing. I hate Citrix.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  17. #14807
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    I hate Citrix.
    Ugh, I'd forgotten all about Citrix, and only have a vague recollection of it now, but it is not pleasant. It was used to access a client's silviculture database. As I recall, it was all slow and clunky.

  18. #14808
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    It was recently discovered that another designer at work made two mistakes in their design. To accommodate these “features”, I have to make changes to my interfacing design. In addition to identifying an engineering fix, this has resulted in several days worth of bureaucratic paperwork for several people, culminating in my having to defend the changes in real-time to a review board.

    What bugs me is that none of this work will be done by the person who caused it.
    Boeing story:
    You controls guys should consider implementing some special control laws so we structure folk can make the wing structure lighter.
    No, that would require us changing this mechanically controlled airplane to fly-by-wire.
    But, but, we already made the wing lighter! So you have to!
    Management: Why are you control guys so far over budget? Look what structures did, they made the airplane lighter!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #14809
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    My financial cuffing application (work) is acting up again. It's been one thing or another for 13 years with this thing. I hate Citrix.
    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Ugh, I'd forgotten all about Citrix, and only have a vague recollection of it now, but it is not pleasant. It was used to access a client's silviculture database. As I recall, it was all slow and clunky.
    I’m curious, were these access speed issues or something else? I used Citrix for telecommuting (pre-pandemic) before I retired and it seemed to work well enough for what it was. In my case, I usually connected in to my work computer but also used some software off the cloud. I seemed to have a fairly fast connection (which I ascribe more to my broadband and what they had at work than to Citrix itself). Occasionally it could be down, and that *was* annoying.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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  20. #14810
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    Jon Stewart was Stephen Colbert's first in-person guest in the studio last night, and he has been alone in his attic for too long.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  21. #14811
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I’m curious, were these access speed issues or something else? I used Citrix for telecommuting (pre-pandemic) before I retired and it seemed to work well enough for what it was. In my case, I usually connected in to my work computer but also used some software off the cloud. I seemed to have a fairly fast connection (which I ascribe more to my broadband and what they had at work than to Citrix itself). Occasionally it could be down, and that *was* annoying.
    It's been a long time, but as I recall, I often could not get a connection to do the work they'd contracted me to do. I divided my time between the field and office days, and if I couldn't get into the system on an office day, I wasn't earning anything. Doing field work required an early start, so when the system decided at noon that it was done for the day, it was too late to start anything else. Whether this was a problem with Citrix or with the number of connections my client permitted, I do not know.

  22. #14812
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I’m curious, were these access speed issues or something else?
    It has often been a question of speed but not always.

    We access the web app through CITRIX Receiver and to be fair, it's a big database. It can take a while to load your dataset, depending upon network speed, how narrow/broad your filter scenario is, and how many users are connected. It's worse when I'm working from home. Even with 300↓/10↑ the VPN makes things sluggish.

    Many times, however, it's just CITRIX itself. Most times, it takes several attempts to get a log-in screen, if I get one at all. The "Starting..." dialog sits on the screen for a long time, disappears, then nothing. I rarely get in on the first try. Sometimes it takes three or five or more. Many more. I couldn't get in until midday yesterday and when I did, the main menu screen flashed erratically and was unresponsive to mouse clicks. I had to stab it to death with the Task Manager.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  23. #14813
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    This is admittedly very, very trivial. But there are some words that I don't know how to pronounce, either because I've never heard people talking about them (so only saw them in scientific papers, for example), or because I first heard them when I was growing up (in France) and don't know if the way I pronounce them is correct. A case in point is the candy, nougat. I pronounce it to rhyme with tuba, so not T at the end, but I wonder how people really say it in English because I don't think I've ever really discussed it in English.

    Of course, I realize I could simply look it up on Google...
    As above, so below

  24. #14814
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    This is admittedly very, very trivial. But there are some words that I don't know how to pronounce, either because I've never heard people talking about them (so only saw them in scientific papers, for example), or because I first heard them when I was growing up (in France) and don't know if the way I pronounce them is correct. A case in point is the candy, nougat. I pronounce it to rhyme with tuba, so not T at the end, but I wonder how people really say it in English because I don't think I've ever really discussed it in English.

    Of course, I realize I could simply look it up on Google...
    I’m just the same. (Minus growing up in France.) I pronounced “bishoprics” as “bihs-phoor-ics” in my head until my third year of graduate school, when I heard a professor actually say it out loud.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  25. #14815
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    Then, there's Ed Norton and "poloponies."

  26. #14816
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    I've spent 10 years giving lectures on centrifugal pumps without knowing how to pronounce "centrifugal". I looked it up and found vastly different answers.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  27. #14817
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    This is admittedly very, very trivial. But there are some words that I don't know how to pronounce, either because I've never heard people talking about them (so only saw them in scientific papers, for example), or because I first heard them when I was growing up (in France) and don't know if the way I pronounce them is correct. A case in point is the candy, nougat. I pronounce it to rhyme with tuba, so not T at the end, but I wonder how people really say it in English because I don't think I've ever really discussed it in English.

    Of course, I realize I could simply look it up on Google...
    I grew up in England with “new gar”
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  28. #14818
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    This is admittedly very, very trivial. But there are some words that I don't know how to pronounce, either because I've never heard people talking about them (so only saw them in scientific papers, for example), or because I first heard them when I was growing up (in France) and don't know if the way I pronounce them is correct. A case in point is the candy, nougat. I pronounce it to rhyme with tuba, so not T at the end, but I wonder how people really say it in English because I don't think I've ever really discussed it in English.

    Of course, I realize I could simply look it up on Google...
    My grandmother pronounced it "nugget", in a no-nonsense, not-pandering-to-Johnny-Foreigner kind of way.
    But 'nuːgɑː is what out local sweet shop sold. So it very much doesn't rhyme with tuba ('tjubə) in British English, but may well do so in your brand of American English. Haven't eaten it since I was a kid.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Jun-16 at 08:48 AM.

  29. #14819
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    My grandmother pronounced it "nugget", in a no-nonsense, not-pandering-to-Johnny-Foreigner kind of way.
    But 'nuːgɑː is what out local sweet shop sold. So it very much doesn't rhyme with tuba ('tjubə) in British English, but may well do so in your brand of American English. Haven't eaten it since I was a kid.
    Yeah, in America we pronounce tuba with a tuː rather than a tju. I'm not sure about the second vowel though. I think I say them the same, but maybe not quite, because in the dictionary it says that Americans pronounce the instrument like tu:bə, and I guess I do that too (the stress in tuba is on the first syllable but in nougat it's flat or maybe I put the stress on the second syllable, as I think in French the stress is lighter than in English).
    As above, so below

  30. #14820
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    In the US, people from what I can tell definitely generally pronounce the "t." I certainly do, after a lifetime of commercials that do. "NOO-gat," with the emphasis being slight, is how most people I know say it.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

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