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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #14341
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    My mistake, the app is called "peakhunter", not "peakbagger".
    So . . . does this look as bad as it looks?

  2. #14342
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    There don’t seen to be as many April Fools jokes this year on the sites I visit as in some past years.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  3. #14343
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    There don’t seen to be as many April Fools jokes this year on the sites I visit as in some past years.
    The Windstar Cruise line (small sailing ship cruises) posted on Facebook and their website that they were building a $500 million cruise submarine.

    Go deep on distinct travel experiences beyond conventional cruise lines, slipping beneath the waves to flawlessly smooth cruise conditions, gliding beneath storm fronts and resurfacing at sunny, uncrowded ports days before rerouted cruise liners return to itineraries. With a range down to 950 feet, Star Fish, Windstar’s newest and most unique cruise vessel, calmly glides to depths where surface turbulence remains undetectable, where guests savor a rich bounty of personalized touches, immersive undersea excursions, and delicious international cuisine.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  4. #14344
    With all the exoplanet discoveries the mass in the galaxy is increasing, so much so that in 230 years there will be a back hole with a radius of 10 kpc.
    2103.17079.pdf (arxiv.org)
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  5. #14345
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    Today is my niece's 40th birthday. It makes ME feel old!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #14346
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    The Windstar Cruise line (small sailing ship cruises) posted on Facebook and their website that they were building a $500 million cruise submarine.
    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    With all the exoplanet discoveries the mass in the galaxy is increasing, so much so that in 230 years there will be a back hole with a radius of 10 kpc.
    2103.17079.pdf (arxiv.org)
    Thanks, guys!
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  7. #14347
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    I recently made an online purchase that was charged to my Healthcare Spending Account Visa card.
    Today, the charge appeared in my account, but is 1˘ less than the amount shown on my printed receipt.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  8. #14348
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    Back in the Great Depression, my grandfather, who was a small-town lawyer in Wyoming, did legal work in exchange for mineral rights from ranchers who had land, sheep, and cattle; but no cash. I've inherited a fraction of that and once got a check for one cent for royalties.

    Meanwhile, my niece is today celebrating her 40th birthday. It makes ME feel old!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  9. #14349
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    Personally, I'm glad there are fewer April Fools' jokes. My local bookstore had a good one, but by and large, I've always found the jokes to be more cruel than funny.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  10. #14350
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    I saw an announcement from an organisation that felt it necessary to mention that it was not an April Fools' Day joke.
    So . . . does this look as bad as it looks?

  11. #14351
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    I miss the AFD pranks from Lee Valley, a Canadian vendor/manufacturer of fine woodworking tools. Each year, they would create an elaborate spoof tool, carefully engineered and fabricated as it were the real thing, complete with a "What's New" product announcement. The fact that they manufacture under the name Veritas adds a dash of sweet irony. To illustrate, here's a tool I own versus it's AFD version:

    Reality versus The Absurd
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	26026 Click image for larger version. 

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    Dual Marking Gauge The Dodeca-Gauge

    They stopped doing this a few years ago and have revamped their website since then, so the archived AFD pages have been 404ed into oblivion. This disappoints me not only for humor but as serendipity would have it, one of their pranks became a real product offering. The jokey story tape was based on the old, real, and useful storey pole or story stick. I image that after the chuckling subsided, someone said, "You know, this isn't such a bad idea." I even have one in my kit, albeit from another manufacturer.
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  12. #14352
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    There don’t seen to be as many April Fools jokes this year on the sites I visit as in some past years.
    Check out this video from Scott Manley:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FDLWYXPnKQ8
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  13. #14353
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    That “thyme” is pronounced like “time” and not like “thy-mm”.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  14. #14354
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    That “thyme” is pronounced like “time” and not like “thy-mm”.
    You know it is the favorite herb of the Doctor, he is after all a thymelord.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  15. #14355
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    That “thyme” is pronounced like “time” and not like “thy-mm”.
    It's not the pronunciation, it's the spelling--it used to be spelled "tyme". But the same people who put the silent "s" into "i(s)le" to reflect its Latin etymology but the "h" into "t(h)yme" to reflect its Greek etymology.

    Grant Hutchison

  16. #14356
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    That “thyme” is pronounced like “time” and not like “thy-mm”.
    Yeah, but if it wasn't pronounced like "time" then Scarborough Fair wouldn't rhyme!
    As above, so below

  17. #14357
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Yeah, but if it wasn't pronounced like "time" then Scarborough Fair wouldn't rhyme!
    It doesn't anyhow. It rhymes "thyme" with "mine".
    Then there's "Smackwater Jack", which manages to rhyme "order", "border", and "daughters".
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #14358
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    It doesn't anyhow. It rhymes "thyme" with "mine".
    That's a rhyme. An assonant slant rhyme, to be exact. Any port in a storm, I say.

    (In my local dialect, "snow" rhymes exactly with "jaw" and "ball"; "sparrow" rhymes exactly with "father". Visitors from out of town spend a lot of time looking panicky and confused.)

    Grant Hutchison

  19. #14359
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    Nothing could be as bad as sticking a certain major river with one old dialect's spelling and another old dialect's pronunciation.

  20. #14360
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    ..."sparrow" rhymes exactly with "father"...
    I can't even figure out how that is possible. But then it's Monday morning and I'm brain dead.

    On a similar vein, why is it "pronounce" and "pronunciation"? Makes no sense. But then most of the English language doesn't.

    Like the I before E rule has more exceptions than not (like the aforementioned "vein"... though that falls into the "sound of A as in neighbor and weigh" exception... but what about weird, caffeine, atheist, forfeit, etc?)

  21. #14361
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    Not sure whether this falls under trivial, but... chiclet keyboards. I miss the days of laptops with real sculpted keys you could actually type on. Yes, "thin is in" but what is a keyboard? Something you type on. Chiclets are not typist friendly.

    And then Apple thought it made sense to use chiclet keyboards on desktops too. And now everyone has them.

    Not only are they flat and short travel, but the rubber membranes are squishy and not very tactile.

    Maybe I miss the days of the old IBM Model M/Model F keyboards that were built like tanks and you could actually TYPE on.

    I had to buy a gaming keyboard with real mechanical keys to use on my work computer since I'm on it all day.

  22. #14362
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpatz View Post
    Not sure whether this falls under trivial, but... chiclet keyboards. I miss the days of laptops with real sculpted keys you could actually type on. Yes, "thin is in" but what is a keyboard? Something you type on. Chiclets are not typist friendly.

    And then Apple thought it made sense to use chiclet keyboards on desktops too. And now everyone has them.

    Not only are they flat and short travel, but the rubber membranes are squishy and not very tactile.

    Maybe I miss the days of the old IBM Model M/Model F keyboards that were built like tanks and you could actually TYPE on.

    I had to buy a gaming keyboard with real mechanical keys to use on my work computer since I'm on it all day.
    My old IBM keyboard dates to 1986.

    The neighborhood hears me typing.

  23. #14363
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    My morning routine is to get up with my wife's alarm, visit the bathroom, and then go into the computer to visit my webcomics. At 7:00 there's an alarm reminding me to go fix breakfast and take my meds. How does the computer know to go into screensaver consistently 10 seconds before I get sat back down?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #14364
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpatz View Post
    Makes no sense. But then most of the English language doesn't.
    Depends on your definition of "makes sense." If you mean "doesn't follow standardized rules," sure. On the other hand, every single exception makes sense inasmuch as there is a reason for it and it's not just people deciding to spell things differently for no reason. Sometimes, it's a bad reason. But it's always there, if you study etymology.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  25. #14365
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    My morning routine is to get up with my wife's alarm, visit the bathroom, and then go into the computer to visit my webcomics. At 7:00 there's an alarm reminding me to go fix breakfast and take my meds. How does the computer know to go into screensaver consistently 10 seconds before I get sat back down?
    My screensaver is even more evil, as it waits until after I sit down. It must sense the pressure change in my eyeballs and activate as soon as I begin to read the screen.

  26. #14366
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    It bugs me when people use “cryptid” as a term for anything strange or unusual rather than as a specific term for an animal of an alleged unknown species. Eccentric humans, quirks of architecture, machines that malfunction strangely, and weird or obscure products are not cryptids.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  27. #14367
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpatz View Post
    I can't even figure out how that is possible. But then it's Monday morning and I'm brain dead.

    On a similar vein, why is it "pronounce" and "pronunciation"? Makes no sense. But then most of the English language doesn't.

    Like the I before E rule has more exceptions than not (like the aforementioned "vein"... though that falls into the "sound of A as in neighbor and weigh" exception... but what about weird, caffeine, atheist, forfeit, etc?)
    Something that baffles me is why the emphasis in some multi-syllable words will change depending on their suffixes.

    POL-i-tics

    po-LI-tical

    po-li-TIC-ian

  28. #14368
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesabrown View Post
    Something that baffles me is why the emphasis in some multi-syllable words will change depending on their suffixes.

    POL-i-tics

    po-LI-tical

    po-li-TIC-ian
    It's called proparoxytone, and it's pretty much dominant in English polysyllabic words--the stress goes on the antepenultimate (third from last) syllable. In some dialects (including mine) that's complicated by the fact we tend to pronounce some originally two-syllable suffixes as one syllable (like -ian in your last example), which converts an original proparoxytone to a paroxytone (emphasis on second-last syllable).
    So in English we give priority to the prosody over the etymology. I don't think we know why that's the case, though.

    Grant Hutchison

  29. #14369
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpatz View Post
    I can't even figure out how that is possible. But then it's Monday morning and I'm brain dead.

    On a similar vein, why is it "pronounce" and "pronunciation"? Makes no sense. But then most of the English language doesn't.

    Like the I before E rule has more exceptions than not (like the aforementioned "vein"... though that falls into the "sound of A as in neighbor and weigh" exception... but what about weird, caffeine, atheist, forfeit, etc?)
    A weird atheist forfeits caffeine. ...I'll take their cup, then.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  30. #14370
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    A weird atheist forfeits caffeine. ...I'll take their cup, then.
    Note that "weird" is an anagram of "wired".

    Meanwhile, I went to look up something on Wikipedia a few minutes ago and they had a featured article on the Soderala Vane. Which is utterly lacking in any information as to its size. 2x3 meters? 2x3 cm? Who knows, I certainly don't.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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