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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #12961
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    One thing the Current Unpleasantness has taught me is that people initialize "toilet paper" as "TP". Never seen that before. But I still think, "Twisted Pair? No. Trade Paperback? No ..." every time I see it.

    Grant Hutchison
    Oh dear, I have contacts using BR.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  2. #12962
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Oh dear, I have contacts using BR.
    Nope. No idea.

    Grant Hutchison

  3. #12963
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Done this and used PB for peanut butter since 1975.
    Really? (Patrol Boat. Paperback.)
    I'm curious about the precision of your dating.

    Grant Hutchison

  4. #12964
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    Yep, I've used TP in both spoken language and on checklists for years.

    PBJ or PB&J sandwiches: Peanut butter and jam. (ETA: also since the 1970s)

  5. #12965
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Nope. No idea.

    Grant Hutchison
    Well it’s still a Roll.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  6. #12966
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    Yep, I've used TP in both spoken language and on checklists for years.

    PBJ or PB&J sandwiches: Peanut butter and jam. (ETA: also since the 1970s)
    Is that related to BLT sandwiches, do you have those?
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  7. #12967
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    I guess I'm perhaps resistant to acquiring any more initialisms in my life, because my head's already full of so many:

    If you want to be a medic
    Then you're going to have a headache
    Unless you have a memory that's macro.
    For the thing that most displeases
    Is the list of dread diseases
    Whose -nyms are either epo- ones or acro-.


    Grant Hutchison

  8. #12968
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Is that related to BLT sandwiches, do you have those?
    Oh yes - bacon lettuce tomato. Bread must be toasted though!

  9. #12969
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I guess I'm perhaps resistant to acquiring any more initialisms in my life … [/i]

    Grant Hutchison
    The "temporary" ones are really bad. Science magazine really tries to minimize its character count. So whenever a long word, or expression is used more than once in a paper or article, an abbreviation will be defined the first time it appears.

    For example, from a random page in a recent issue:
    … enigmatic, membraneless protein granules (keratohyalin granules, KG) …
    … filaggrin (FLG) …
    (I have no intention of reading that article.)

    I would have thought this shouldn't be a problem for me with papers where I supposedly have the necessary background, but these one-article uses of abbreviations sometimes make it difficult for me to read a paper without having to look for the definitions when I encounter them again long after they're first defined.

  10. #12970
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    The "temporary" ones are really bad. Science magazine really tries to minimize its character count. So whenever a long word, or expression is used more than once in a paper or article, an abbreviation will be defined the first time it appears.

    For example, from a random page in a recent issue:
    … enigmatic, membraneless protein granules (keratohyalin granules, KG) …
    … filaggrin (FLG) …
    (I have no intention of reading that article.)

    I would have thought this shouldn't be a problem for me with papers where I supposedly have the necessary background, but these one-article uses of abbreviations sometimes make it difficult for me to read a paper without having to look for the definitions when I encounter them again long after they're first defined.
    That's certainly a typographical convention in medical journals, but sometimes with the reverse effect, so that one has to at first spell out in full expressions that are universally recognized and used as initialisms within the profession. An analogy would be, I suppose, if every article written about NASA had to at first mention "the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)".

    Grant Hutchison

  11. #12971
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Really? (Patrol Boat. Paperback.)
    I'm curious about the precision of your dating. Grant Hutchison
    Married first wife then, who used those abbreviations habitually. I picked them up from her from 1975 onward. Wife was from Ohio, where it seemed to be a thing. I am from Louisville, never did it till then.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  12. #12972
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I guess I'm perhaps resistant to acquiring any more initialisms in my life, because my head's already full of so many.
    I use a lot of them when writing notes to myself, just as a personal shorthand with little symbols and icons. I write my children's names in shorthand with their first-name initials encircled, and my wife's pet-name initial circled. I have a lot of science shorthand things, like writing the alchemical symbols for Jupiter and Saturn, etc., that "number 4" for Jupiter, etc. I've gotten used to certain astronomical acronyms from reading so many papers, like AGN, and oh man of course star names (Prox Cent c) and things like M31.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  13. #12973
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    That's certainly a typographical convention in medical journals, but sometimes with the reverse effect, so that one has to at first spell out in full expressions that are universally recognized and used as initialisms within the profession. An analogy would be, I suppose, if every article written about NASA had to at first mention "the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)". Grant Hutchison
    In our little forum, we get away with a lot of acronyms and abbreviations (ACRO and abbrev.) that we never would otherwise. NASA is so commonplace now I think everyone knows of it.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  14. #12974
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    That's certainly a typographical convention in medical journals, but sometimes with the reverse effect, so that one has to at first spell out in full expressions that are universally recognized and used as initialisms within the profession. An analogy would be, I suppose, if every article written about NASA had to at first mention "the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)".

    Grant Hutchison
    Many people today do not know what DNA stands for, and yet I cannot recall any journal or general articles also spelling out "deoxyribonucleic acid". When the deluge of papers on CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, for those of you unfamiliar with it ) began, all the articles I read were giving it the full definition treatment. And in just a few years I started noticing it being used in the same way as DNA. I was even going to comment on it here in the "amusing" thread, but when I checked more deeply into it, I found plenty of articles still giving it full treatment.

  15. #12975
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    Question

    Here is one of my note pages relating to that thread in which I am trying to replicate that statistical study.

    https://forum.cosmoquest.org/showthr...g-just-for-fun
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    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  16. #12976
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    Sorry, but I need more context than scribbled notes: What is the trivial thing bugging you?

    My trivial item: those annoying video windows popping up in the lower right of so many web pages these days. They distract me from the web page and I can’t close them fast enough, but go to another page on the same site, and one will pop up again. Or sometimes even on the same page. And in some cases they make them hard to close.

    I am usually reading at home so bandwidth isn’t an issue, but that would be a concern on cell service.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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  17. #12977
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    Roger Moore's "check engine" avatar pic. My car's got a really trivial issue that makes that light pop up, and I need to bring it in for ignition coil replacement, just don't get around to do it. Every morning .. will the damn light pop up? ... all commute.. NO engine light! .... get to work... check Cosmoquest.. and there it is! Aaaargh. Ah well, it doesn't bug me all that much
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  18. #12978
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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    Roger Moore's "check engine" avatar pic. My car's got a really trivial issue that makes that light pop up, and I need to bring it in for ignition coil replacement, just don't get around to do it. Every morning .. will the damn light pop up? ... all commute.. NO engine light! .... get to work... check Cosmoquest.. and there it is! Aaaargh. Ah well, it doesn't bug me all that much
    My work here is almost done.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  19. #12979
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Sorry, but I need more context than scribbled notes: What is the trivial thing bugging you?
    I forgot to talk about rocky planetary cores.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  20. #12980
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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    Roger Moore's "check engine" avatar pic. My car's got a really trivial issue that makes that light pop up, and I need to bring it in for ignition coil replacement, just don't get around to do it. Every morning .. will the damn light pop up? ... all commute.. NO engine light! .... get to work... check Cosmoquest.. and there it is! Aaaargh. Ah well, it doesn't bug me all that much
    My light's on. The heater in one of the two pre-cataltytic-converter-oxygen-sensors is dead. Which means it doesn't come up to temperature quickly, so the car will burn a little more fuel than it should, for a while.

    The cost of the sensor (without installation) was a significant percentage of the value of the car, so I just ignore it.

    A few weeks ago took the car for WOF (warrant of fitness) and servicing, and asked them to re-check the error codes.

    All they found were old codes for the ABS, which they cleared (after testing no actual issue in ABS sensors). Gave me back the car with no engine light.

    On the way home ...

    Sigh.


    (Meanwhile the car had failed the WOF for a windscreen chip that's been there for many many years (and which I think they measured incorrectly); and now I can't get it fixed as everything is shut down, and because the fail was just before the shutdown my insurance won't cover me in their "if your WOF fails during the shutdown" exclusion. So I have no car for a while.)
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

    Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.

  21. #12981
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    My light's on.
    NOW my work here is done. Thank you all!
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  22. #12982
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    One thing the Current Unpleasantness has taught me is that people initialize "toilet paper" as "TP". Never seen that before. But I still think, "Twisted Pair? No. Trade Paperback? No ..." every time I see it.

    Grant Hutchison
    Pretty common Americanism for ever, I think, despite efforts of many, including the manufacturers to use euphemisms like "bathroom tissue".
    Now we've "progressed" far enough that perhaps the biggest manufacturer here bases all of their ads on bears, because of what they proverbially do in the woods.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  23. #12983
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    Gosh, I missed a whole page before I did the previous post! That bugs me!

    Regarding acronyms: My former (very large aerospace) company used to have a printed publication on Acronyms and Abbreviations, then converted to a web page. It was VERY long. Some had 40 or 50 meanings.

    Check Engine Light: It's ALWAYS emission control related. The first time it happened, I didn't know that and immediately pulled off the road and raised the hood. Yup, the engine was still there. Turned out the catalytic converter had failed. It was warrantied for 100,000 miles and the car made it to about 101,000 when it happened. When my old pickup was about to hit 50,000, I was watching the odometer. As it turned over, the light came on. There was an oxygen sensor they had hard-timed at 50,000.

    I wasn't happy with either of those.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #12984
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    I really need a haircut but the current situation says "grow a ponytail."

  25. #12985
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Pretty common Americanism for ever, I think, despite efforts of many, including the manufacturers to use euphemisms like "bathroom tissue".
    Now we've "progressed" far enough that perhaps the biggest manufacturer here bases all of their ads on bears, because of what they proverbially do in the woods.
    I've always known that. Probably watch a lot more U.S. T.V. than Grant.

    I thought TP was already a euphemism of sorts. Americans (by what I see on T.V.) always seem puritanical* about oddly specific things.


    (* Not meaning to be harsh, can't think of a gentler word.)
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

    Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.

  26. #12986
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    In a recent editorial, I saw Ben Ainslie call it “loo roll”, so I don’t think the Brits really have any leg to stand on in saying our name for it sounds silly.
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  27. #12987
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    In a recent editorial, I saw Ben Ainslie call it “loo roll”, so I don’t think the Brits really have any leg to stand on in saying our name for it sounds silly.
    Here you might hear "bog roll", but usually just "toilet paper", as Taika Waititi would say ...

    (Ad regularly showing on T.V. right now. Very mild language warning.)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3z9kUPnlFQ
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

    Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.

  28. #12988
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    In a recent editorial, I saw Ben Ainslie call it “loo roll”, so I don’t think the Brits really have any leg to stand on in saying our name for it sounds silly.
    Did anyone say it sounded silly? I'd just never encountered the initialism before, probably because people have never talked so obsessively about bumf before.
    (Bumf is short for "bum-fodder", British English usage of "bum". I don't hear it much used as a word for toilet paper any more, though, because the label was transferred contemptuously to any bits of paper people thought were useless or trivial, like advertising leaflets.)

    Grant Hutchison

  29. #12989
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    omgosh, let's not start an internalnational incident over toilet paper! Think of the bear cubs!
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  30. #12990
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    omgosh, let's not start an internalnational incident over toilet paper! Think of the bear cubs!
    Who boast about how clean their underwear is, while not wearing anything at all!

    That NZ ad is very good.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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