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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #9211
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    Quote Originally Posted by astrotimer View Post
    I wish some people would learn to read
    Fixed that for you.

  2. #9212
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    Really trivial stuff that bugs you

    My company has replaced the "health center" in our office that was staffed with a nurse, and no cost to use with a "wellness center" that has a Telemedicine booth that costs $49 per consultation.

    Trivial only because I've never needed it.



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  3. #9213
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    Quote Originally Posted by danscope View Post
    Well, we prefer to say it as " a wee bit frugal "
    And do you affect a comic Scottish accent while saying that?

    Grant Hutchison

  4. #9214
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    And do you affect a comic Scottish accent while saying that?

    Grant Hutchison
    Are there other kinds?

    (Sorry)

    Were they carpenter bees that were vexing you Doc?
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  5. #9215
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    Were they carpenter bees that were vexing you Doc?
    Nah, we don't have carpenter bees in Scotland - couple of species in the UK, but they don't come this far north (yet). Looked like mining bees to me.
    (We had some mason bees take up residence in one of our bird boxes a couple of years ago - they've been edging north for quite a few years.)

    Grant Hutchison

  6. #9216
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    Hi Grant, " I canna abide any situation doesn't involve thrift."

  7. #9217
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDon View Post
    Are there other kinds?
    And this coming from the guy who's completely unintelligible to most Australians. Though with me it's the Welsh.

    The exception being this one Welsh woman I met who sounded remarkably like Dianna Rigg. (Who's from Yorkshire.)
    Time wasted having fun is not time wasted - Lennon
    (John, not the other one.)

  8. #9218
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    I had a professor tell me that I couldn't reference "Italy" as a country in 1877 because Italy wasn't a country until February 1883. This is a history professor. I bit my tongue. I bit my tongue until it bled.

    I was writing about American history in the post-Reconstruction period and tangentially mentioned how the US came to nearly double it's size with the Louisiana Purchase, which involved a lot of horse trading, including bits of Italy. He was correct that Italy was not a country at the time of the Louisiana Purchase. I imagine that he conflated the publication of Pinocchio in Feb of '83, with the foundation of Italy in Mar of 1861. Considering the Greeks were calling bits of the peninsula "Italy" in 100 BC and the name in reference to that region of the world was already 500 years old, I decided roll over and die. Reasons, facts, logic and history were all off the table in this conversation.

    It was a toss off paragraph I was using to demonstrate that I had, in fact, done research from all angles. I'll never do that again.
    Solfe

  9. #9219
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    Wasn't the "Italian" involvement in the Louisiana Purchase back in 1800, when Spain and France traded some territories in what is now Tuscany(ish)?
    (That is, despite your professor getting a date wrong, why is 1877 relevant?)

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2017-May-12 at 01:21 PM. Reason: second para

  10. #9220
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Wasn't the "Italian" involvement in the Louisiana Purchase back in 1800, when Spain and France traded some territories in what is now Tuscany(ish)?
    (That is, despite your professor getting a date wrong, why is 1877 relevant?)

    Grant Hutchison
    Yes, that is right.

    1877 was the date on a letter, it was the last document I used for my paper. I started with a census document from about 100 prior, so I thought it was a nice endcap and a good point recap some of the major changes in the United States over that period.
    Solfe

  11. #9221
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    1877 was the date on a letter, it was the last document I used for my paper. I started with a census document from about 100 prior, so I thought it was a nice endcap and a good point recap some of the major changes in the United States over that period.
    But isn't your professor right, that Italy had nothing to do with the Louisiana Purchase, since there was no such thing as Italy at the time, merely a (poorly honoured) exchange of Tuscan territory between Spain and France?
    Or does the letter mention Italy in some way?

    Grant Hutchison

  12. #9222
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    But isn't your professor right, that Italy had nothing to do with the Louisiana Purchase, since there was no such thing as Italy at the time, merely a (poorly honoured) exchange of Tuscan territory between Spain and France?
    Or does the letter mention Italy in some way?

    Grant Hutchison
    The Treaty of San Ildefonso of specifically mentions Italy by name in Article 2, as the place where Tuscany resides. It also mentions the possibility of Roman/Italy becoming a state and what would happen then. This document is what transferred the land from the Spain to the French, which was in turn sold to the Americans.

    Where he is going wrong is that Italy was an established place, not a county at that time. He wants to nitpick my assertion, even though I specifically said "Italy" and not "the State of Italy" or "the country of Italy". He is turning my statement of fact into something other than it needed to be. I can't really work with that, other than silence.
    Solfe

  13. #9223
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    So, a geographical region - the Italian peninsula.

    Grant Hutchison

  14. #9224
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    Yes, the name had been in use for various parts of the peninsula for centuries. I think he is trying to get a rise out of me.

    He did something similar with my rough draft. He was rather adament that government websites had wrong dates on laws, which was something I pointed one paragraph earlier. I didn't know what to say to that either.

    He's not a bad guy, but he really doesn't do humor or mocking very well.
    Solfe

  15. #9225
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    I think I understand the point he was making. The signatories to San Ildefonso necessarily meant something very different when they wrote "Italy" than we understand today when we read "Italy", simply because there was no such political entity at that time. Historians try to be mindful of that sort of thing, and either use a different form of words, or some explanatory text.

    Same problem in medicine:
    "You've written that this lady is allergic to eggs. She's not allergic to eggs."
    "She told me she was allergic to eggs."
    "They give her indigestion and flatulence. That's not an allergy."
    "But she said she was allergic to eggs."
    "That doesn't mean you should write the word 'allergy' in her medical records."

    Grant Hutchison

  16. #9226
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    The Oscar Mayer Weinermobile was in Alaska a few weeks ago on some kind of promotion. I saw it a few times around town and it really brought back some childhood memories. Today, this video popped up in my Facebook feed: Wienermobile makes first ever visit to Whittier, Alaska.

    The part that bugs me is the advertising hyperbole about Whittier being "One of the most remote towns in the United States." I suppose it can seem that way to a lot of Lower-48ers but it's only a 1½-hour drive from downtown Anchorage, not counting time spent waiting for a scheduled tunnel opening. That also doesn't count the extra time it takes for someone driving a giant hot dog, who is inexperienced driving in icy conditions, on chains, through a narrow tunnel. To us, the claim of remoteness is a bit ridiculous because they're still on the road system...the paved road system. The town has Google Maps Street View coverage, fercryingoutloud.
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  17. #9227
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    The part that bugs me is the advertising hyperbole about Whittier being "One of the most remote towns in the United States." I suppose it can seem that way to a lot of Lower-48ers but it's only a 1½-hour drive from downtown Anchorage, not counting time spent waiting for a scheduled tunnel opening.
    I confess I found the tunnel vaguely stressful, because I seemed to keep dropping into the train tracks, but yeah - even I have been to much more remote US towns than Whittier.
    (Worst ever vehicular tunnel, for me, is the Vestfjarðagöng on the road to Ísafjörður, in northwest Iceland - a two-lane road suddenly narrows down to a nine-kilometre single-track tunnel with passing places - you watch for the headlights of oncoming vehicles, and then look for a dimly lit pull-off area so that one of you can pull to the side and let the other pass. Whittier was pure luxury by comparison!)

    Grant Hutchison

  18. #9228
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I confess I found the tunnel vaguely stressful, because I seemed to keep dropping into the train tracks, but yeah - even I have been to much more remote US towns than Whittier.
    (Worst ever vehicular tunnel, for me, is the Vestfjarðagöng on the road to Ísafjörður, in northwest Iceland - a two-lane road suddenly narrows down to a nine-kilometre single-track tunnel with passing places - you watch for the headlights of oncoming vehicles, and then look for a dimly lit pull-off area so that one of you can pull to the side and let the other pass. Whittier was pure luxury by comparison!)

    Grant Hutchison
    Yikes. Our South Island is littered with bridges like that (one lane, with a few passing bays along them, if long). Not even covered bridges; open to the air (open to view). And people still have trouble on them.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  19. #9229
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    I remember a one-lane road in California from my youth. It descended from Tioga Pass, which I think of as the "back door" of Yosemite National Park, toward Nevada. It had a few wide places for passing, but it was like a single-track railroad with no timetable or signals.

  20. #9230
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    I remember a one-lane road in California from my youth.
    These are common in the north of Scotland. Visitors are so unnerved they drive very slowly, and forget that they're supposed to pull into a passing place to let faster traffic get by. So they accumulate a grumpy queue behind them. If you get two of these tailbacks approaching from opposite directions, it all gets a little fraught. Whereas if you're practised, you spot oncoming traffic in the distance, scope out the passing places, and adjust your speed so that the two cars arrive simultaneously at a passing place and whisk past each other without slowing significantly. It's deeply satisfying, and the drivers who pull it off always exchange broad smiles as they pass.

    Grant Hutchison

  21. #9231
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    These are common in the north of Scotland. Visitors are so unnerved they drive very slowly, and forget that they're supposed to pull into a passing place to let faster traffic get by. So they accumulate a grumpy queue behind them. If you get two of these tailbacks approaching from opposite directions, it all gets a little fraught. Whereas if you're practised, you spot oncoming traffic in the distance, scope out the passing places, and adjust your speed so that the two cars arrive simultaneously at a passing place and whisk past each other without slowing significantly. It's deeply satisfying, and the drivers who pull it off always exchange broad smiles as they pass.

    Grant Hutchison
    I was one of those visitors driving in the Highlands several years ago and adjusted to the pull outs and the rules after about a day. But I also learned that tour buses do not play nice and one simply has to get out of their way.

    Sent from my SM-G920R4 using Tapatalk

  22. #9232
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I think I understand the point he was making. The signatories to San Ildefonso necessarily meant something very different when they wrote "Italy" than we understand today when we read "Italy", simply because there was no such political entity at that time. Historians try to be mindful of that sort of thing, and either use a different form of words, or some explanatory text.

    Same problem in medicine:
    "You've written that this lady is allergic to eggs. She's not allergic to eggs."
    "She told me she was allergic to eggs."
    "They give her indigestion and flatulence. That's not an allergy."
    "But she said she was allergic to eggs."
    "That doesn't mean you should write the word 'allergy' in her medical records."

    Grant Hutchison
    I graduated today. I am just going to let it go.
    Solfe

  23. #9233
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    I graduated today. I am just going to let it go.
    A pedantic friend of mine used to correct that phrase: "You were graduated."

    My response was something like "'They done graduated on me' is more like it."

  24. #9234
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    I have conceded "were graduated," but I'm still holding the line for that "from"--you didn't "graduate college," you "graduated from college."
    _____________________________________________
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  25. #9235
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    I have conceded "were graduated," but I'm still holding the line for that "from"--you didn't "graduate college," you "graduated from college."
    Must be an American thing. The OED has the form "were graduated" as "Now rare", and "to graduate" with a couple of centuries of usage behind it. I've only ever heard the latter.
    But, of course, a person who "graduated college" would be a person who had marked the college building with measurements of some sort.

    Grant Hutchison

  26. #9236
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    The "graduated" discussion reminds me of the car company commercials claiming that their vehicles are "the most awarded."

    Is the company giving them away?


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  27. #9237
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    I have conceded "were graduated," but I'm still holding the line for that "from"--you didn't "graduate college," you "graduated from college."
    It's kind of like "in hospital" (UK) vs "in the hospital" (US).
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  28. #9238
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    It's kind of like "in hospital" (UK) vs "in the hospital" (US).
    Or "at (the) University".

  29. #9239
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    It's Mothers Day. So IFC (formerly Independent Film Channel) is running a marathon of Mommie Dearest. Really, guys, isn't that a bit much?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  30. #9240
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    It's kind of like "in hospital" (UK) vs "in the hospital" (US).
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Or "at (the) University".
    Brits actually use "in the hospital" and "at the university" fairly frequently.
    The phrases "in hospital" and "at university" tend to be reserved for rather general states of existence - "undergoing hospital treatment (somewhere unspecified)" and "undergoing university education (somewhere unspecified)". So: "Your kids must be at university by now?" or "Was he in hospital with that leg?"

    Grant Hutchison

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