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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #12211
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    All the pronunciation differences are why English spelling reform won't work.
    Clearly the answer is metric spelling.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.
    Why is a frog too?

  2. #12212
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    It amuses me that I thought I'd throw something out there quite a few years ago and there are now 12212 posts in this thread. Counting this one.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  3. #12213
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    Clearly the answer is metric spelling.
    01101111 01101011
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  4. #12214
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    But then the argument will be whether it is "zero" or "naught".
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  5. #12215
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    I think it's "naught" when you're talking about spies.

    Gee, I hope someone gets the reference.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

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  6. #12216
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    But then the argument will be whether it is "zero" or "naught".
    OH!
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  7. #12217
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I think it's "naught" when you're talking about spies.

    Gee, I hope someone gets the reference.
    That you, Jethro?


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  8. #12218
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I think it's "naught" when you're talking about spies.

    Gee, I hope someone gets the reference.
    Agent Naught Naught Seven?
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  9. #12219
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    OH!
    I see what you did there.

    Grant Hutchison

  10. #12220
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    A naughty trick.

  11. #12221
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    I found a video of what came to my mind:
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1MWq6L19eNo


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    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  12. #12222
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    That you, Jethro?


    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Agent Naught Naught Seven?
    Double Naught.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

    Moderation will be in purple.
    Rules for Posting to This Board

  13. #12223
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post




    Double Naught.
    Ooh!
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  14. #12224
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    It's generally true, I think, that American accents have lost the rounding on the vowel represented by "o" which is preserved in most British English.
    Not before R. You're describing a "short" O sound here (which of course has nothing to do with length anymore but did once), so I suppose another way to put it is that our letter O is nearly always "long" before R. Exceptions include "worry" and "word" and sometimes "for" if it's rushed (schwas), and "sorry" (close to the standard "short" O before other letters, as if it were spelled "sarry/sari"). Offhand I can't think of another exception in which it's ever unrounded before R.

    This brings to mind two examples I heard years ago, in which I did hear people doing the rare (outside "sorry") /a/-type O before R, in words where it had never been before or since in my life, and they sounded so deeply weird and unnatural that they've stuck in my memory ever since then as some of the oddest bits of mispronunciation I've ever encountered. One was a woman singing "Santa Claus Is Comin' To Town" in a style that sounds like it came from the black-&-white era, who turned "be good for goodness sake" into "be good faa goodness sake". But she also dropped the R entirely and strangely emphazied & elongated that syllable, so I thought it could be a side-effect of how much she was opening up at that moment for that musical reason rather than how she actually intended to pronounce it. And the other was a narrator in a commercial for something he called "Flarida Arange Juice", who made me wonder where in the world the accent he was faking was supposed to be from because it certainly couldn't be anything real. Both were so rare they were jarring.

  15. #12225
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    Not before R. You're describing a "short" O sound here (which of course has nothing to do with length anymore but did once), so I suppose another way to put it is that our letter O is nearly always "long" before R. Exceptions include "worry" and "word" and sometimes "for" if it's rushed (schwas), and "sorry" (close to the standard "short" O before other letters, as if it were spelled "sarry/sari"). Offhand I can't think of another exception in which it's ever unrounded before R.
    Work. Worth. World. Mirror. Color. Major. Minor. Motor. Mayor. Actor. Doctor. Effort. Color. Prior. Rigor. Arbor. Victor. Flavor. Favor. Savor. Sensor. Honor. Terror. Horror. Savior. Glamor. Cursor. Harbor. Rumor. Professor. Succor. Memory. Editor. Record (not that one, the other one). Senior. Sector. Factor. Gorilla. Calorie. Auditor. Advisory. Director. Creator. Visitor. Comfort. Correct. Stubborn. Detector. Behavior. Rhetoric. Bachelor. Thorough. Governor. Interior. Exterior. Emperor. Borough. Projector. Navigator. Successor. Inspector. Indicator. Corporate (second "or"). Categorize (but not category). Decorate (but not decor). Perforate. Contemporary.

    Okay, I'm tired now.

    EDIT: Wait, one more:
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    And the other was a narrator in a commercial for something he called "Flarida Arange Juice", who made me wonder where in the world the accent he was faking was supposed to be from because it certainly couldn't be anything real.
    Last edited by SeanF; 2019-Oct-12 at 03:24 AM.
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  16. #12226
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post




    Double Naught.
    On a slightly more serious note, I’ve always pronounced the symbols for permittivity and permeability of free space as “epsilon naught” and “mu naught”, but I had a British expat as a professor for my introduction to those terms. Do most Americans use those terms, or do they say something like “epsilon sub zero”?





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  17. #12227
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    SeanF's post reveals a new pattern: those are mostly de-emphasized syllables, whereas I had been thinking of OR in emphasized syllables without noticing that myself, and it turns out that O before R is usually "long" when emphasized and "short" when not... which is even consistent with the two pronunciations of "for" depending on its relative emphasis within a whole sentence, and explains why it's "long" in the American version of "laboratory", where the syllable before the second R tends to get a secondary emphasis in American, just like in the American versions of words that end in "-ery" or "-ary".

    (That and the British loss of the same syllable to become just "-ry" serve the same purpose: avoiding ending with three consecutive unemphasized syllables... which "laboratory" tends to hide because there's also another difference in syllable emphasis before that ("lábratóry"/labóratry"... maybe also "lábratry" for some?), but it's easier to follow in examples where we otherwise emphasize the same syllable, like "sécretáry/sécretry".)

  18. #12228
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    That and the British loss of the same syllable to become just "-ry" serve the same purpose ...
    More Southern English than British, I think. When I was a kid growing up in Scotland, omitting the last vowel of words like laboratory and secretary was considered a mark of slovenly speech, like omitting the first "r" in February. It was something that effete southrons did, not gritty northern folk.

    Grant Hutchison

  19. #12229
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    On a slightly more serious note, I’ve always pronounced the symbols for permittivity and permeability of free space as “epsilon naught” and “mu naught”, but I had a British expat as a professor for my introduction to those terms. Do most Americans use those terms, or do they say something like “epsilon sub zero”?
    I don’t understand where the “sub” comes from, but I do think a lot of Americans would say “epsilon zero” and “mu zero.” Of course, the majority of Americans, including me, never have the opportunity to use those terms anyway, even considering the small possibility that they have any idea of what they mean.
    As above, so below

  20. #12230
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    More Southern English than British, I think. When I was a kid growing up in Scotland, omitting the last vowel of words like laboratory and secretary was considered a mark of slovenly speech, like omitting the first "r" in February. It was something that effete southrons did, not gritty northern folk.

    Grant Hutchison
    Hey I may live in Norfolk now where whole junks of words get hidden, (Happisburgh is pronounced “Haysbro”) but I was educated near London, which is in the South of England and February was taught as in the famous rhyme about how many days. But then that was before TV ruined the language with vulgar soap operas.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  21. #12231
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I don’t understand where the “sub” comes from, but I do think a lot of Americans would say “epsilon zero” and “mu zero.” Of course, the majority of Americans, including me, never have the opportunity to use those terms anyway, even considering the small possibility that they have any idea of what they mean.
    The “sub” is short for “subscript”, and was commonly used back when I was in school. Although it may not have been in common usage elsewhere.


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  22. #12232
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    (Happisburgh is pronounced “Haysbro”)
    Do they make toys there? ;-)
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  23. #12233
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Do they make toys there? ;-)
    You’re thinking of Pawtucket.


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  24. #12234
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    01101111 01101011
    Mysterious link : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Whn0YzNG4s
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.
    Why is a frog too?

  25. #12235
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    You’re thinking of Pawtucket.


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    There’s a toy company whose name sounds as much like “Pawtucket” as “Haysbro” sounds like “Hasbro”?
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  26. #12236
    There is a robo-caller that when you pick a rather obvious robot voice gives a message from service Canada saying there is a judgement against you, they call about twice a day with a different number on the caller id. So not only are they are probably trying a lot of numbers, then the change their number to spoof another phone and go all over that again. Infinite loop, heck.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
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  27. #12237
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    There’s a toy company whose name sounds as much like “Pawtucket” as “Haysbro” sounds like “Hasbro”?
    No, you asked where they make toys.
    (Although I suspect that the Hassenfeld Brothers don't make many there, anymore)
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  28. #12238
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    When did my life change from trying to make computers do stuff I wanted them to do, to trying to stop computers doing stuff I don't want them to do? How did that happen without my ever passing through a "sweet spot" between these two extremes?

    No, I don't want you to run on start-up. No, I don't want you to run in the background. No, I don't want that strange floating toolbar on my desktop that gives access to "common" tasks I never perform. No, you're not getting to access the internet and my camera unless I say so, and you're certainly not getting to automatically copy my stuff to "the cloud", whether or not you've given a happy name to a server farm in (at best) Gibraltar. No, I don't want to receive your alleged "tips" on how to do straightforward things, and I don't want to have to edit the freakin' registry in order to get rid of those tips. When I do want to know how to do something, a paragraph of text will suffice, thank you, and one that is already present on my hard drive - I have no interest in watching three on-line minutes of a curiously coiffed and over-excited young man "explaining" something that turns out to be very slightly different from what I want to know. And I certainly do not wish to interact with you socially, on any level, so please stop trying. That was bad enough when you were a perky little paperclip, but now that you're a sinister facsimile of a cognitively impaired person with a neurological illness, we're just not going to get along at all. The sooner you understand that, the better.

    Grant Hutchison

  29. #12239
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    When did my life change from trying to make computers do stuff I wanted them to do, to trying to stop computers doing stuff I don't want them to do? How did that happen without my ever passing through a "sweet spot" between these two extremes?

    No, I don't want you to run on start-up. No, I don't want you to run in the background. No, I don't want that strange floating toolbar on my desktop that gives access to "common" tasks I never perform. No, you're not getting to access the internet and my camera unless I say so, and you're certainly not getting to automatically copy my stuff to "the cloud", whether or not you've given a happy name to a server farm in (at best) Gibraltar. No, I don't want to receive your alleged "tips" on how to do straightforward things, and I don't want to have to edit the freakin' registry in order to get rid of those tips. When I do want to know how to do something, a paragraph of text will suffice, thank you, and one that is already present on my hard drive - I have no interest in watching three on-line minutes of a curiously coiffed and over-excited young man "explaining" something that turns out to be very slightly different from what I want to know. And I certainly do not wish to interact with you socially, on any level, so please stop trying. That was bad enough when you were a perky little paperclip, but now that you're a sinister facsimile of a cognitively impaired person with a neurological illness, we're just not going to get along at all. The sooner you understand that, the better.

    Grant Hutchison
    Amen! Once again it appears that we have software developers in their own little world, who cannot resist showing off their virtuosity regardless of whether it is suitable for ordinary users like you and I. In my fantasy world I would wash their mouths out with a greasy sample of the soap I made in high school chemistry. I don't want to hurt the poor schlubs with a caustic sample, just make it unpleasant.

  30. #12240
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    We had a new house built last year. That made me happy.
    We had a propane-powered generator added to it for backup power. That made me more secure.
    Winter is coming, so I'd like to get it serviced and checked out. That made me frustrated yesterday.

    The company that installed it specializes in new construction and doesn't do service.
    The Generator is from Kohler. There's a tag right on it saying go to kohlersmartpower.com. When I do that I get a page about toilets, showers, and sinks. Try it.
    Ok, kohlerpower.com gets you generators. Just leave out the "smart", because what comes next is dumb.
    Click on "Find a Dealer". It takes you to this page. Which doesn't work. At all. No matter what you put in the search box it just reloads the page.

    Here's a challenge for you: Find me an authorized Kohler dealer to service my generator. Location is Port Townsend, WA, 98368.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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