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Thread: Really trivial stuff that bugs you

  1. #12421
    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    s/could of/could have/g
    Thanks.
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  2. #12422
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    A fellow I worked with some years back was a hunter. He wore an orange hat AND an orange jacket. (They had camouflage patterns. Apparently deer aren't too good at distinguishing colors.) He had found a good spot and was hunkered down waiting. He rose up slightly to check for deer when there was a thunk in the tree next to him and the sound of a gun shot quickly after.
    Ug.

    As for color, white-tail only have two color cones (essentially blue and green, not red). They can't see orange and red colors so they will appear as black. They do see, however, into the uv band so they should be able to see hunters climb into trees or blinds if the hunters wait till just minutes before darkness (visual) ends.
    We know time flies, we just can't see its wings.

  3. #12423
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    s/could of/could have/g
    “could’ve”?


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  4. #12424
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    I worked in an emergency room in North America, many years ago, which had a display in the reception area of two hunter-orange jackets with bullet holes in them. One was child-sized.

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #12425
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I worked in an emergency room in North America, many years ago, which had a display in the reception area of two hunter-orange jackets with bullet holes in them. One was child-sized.

    Grant Hutchison
    I assume the jacket was child-sized. A child-sized hole would have been a very big bullet.
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  6. #12426
    Quote Originally Posted by swift View Post
    i assume the jacket was child-sized. A child-sized hole would have been a very big bullet.
    lol.
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  7. #12427
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    s/could of/could have/g
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    “could’ve”?
    Coulda.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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  8. #12428
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Coulda.
    It just was not a good day, still have the head cold.
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  9. #12429
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I assume the jacket was child-sized. A child-sized hole would have been a very big bullet.
    Old Parks and Recreation joke - the child-sized drinks in the local fast-food joint were the size of a child.
    But, yes - the bullet holes in the jackets, and the people who had been wearing the jackets, were from 30-calibre hunting rifles. The jackets had been donated by their next of kin, and were displayed along with relevant newspaper clippings in a glass case, next to a big sheaf of gun-safety leaflets.

    Grant Hutchison

  10. #12430
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    It just was not a good day, still have the head cold.
    I’m not poking fun at you.
    While I use “could have” when writing, when speaking, it is clearly “could’ve” or “coulda”.

    Anyone gotta problem wit dat?


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  11. #12431
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I’m not poking fun at you.
    While I use “could have” when writing, when speaking, it is clearly “could’ve” or “coulda”.

    Anyone gotta problem wit dat?

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    No, problem.
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  12. #12432
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    So, there's the word could've.

    And there's the word couldn't.

    Why not the word couldn't've?

    I wouldn't've thought that using couldn't've would be a problem, but since I received a negative mark for using it in an essay, I shouldn't've used it.

  13. #12433
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    I'd've avoided it too.

  14. #12434
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesabrown View Post
    So, there's the word could've.

    And there's the word couldn't.

    Why not the word couldn't've?

    I wouldn't've thought that using couldn't've would be a problem, but since I received a negative mark for using it in an essay, I shouldn't've used it.
    I love the fact that the internet is full of anxious people asking each other questions like, "Is didn't've a word?"
    Because, yes, Mumsnet is the obvious source of authoratitive pronouncements on the word/not-a-word dichotomy.

    Grant Hutchison

  15. #12435
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamesabrown View Post
    So, there's the word could've.

    And there's the word couldn't.

    Why not the word couldn't've?

    I wouldn't've thought that using couldn't've would be a problem, but since I received a negative mark for using it in an essay, I shouldn't've used it.
    It's perfectly valid to do double contractions. Decades ago, there was a song with the line, "If I knew you were coming, I'd've baked a cake."

    For that matter, you can do triples: "I'dn't've (I would not have) done that if I were you..."
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  16. #12436
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I assume the jacket was child-sized. A child-sized hole would have been a very big bullet.
    Or a very small child.


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    As above, so below

  17. #12437
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I worked in an emergency room in North America, many years ago, which had a display in the reception area of two hunter-orange jackets with bullet holes in them. One was child-sized.

    Grant Hutchison
    My father -- who was a WW2 combat veteran -- stopped hunting after he decided he was too likely to get shot.
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  18. #12438
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    Quote Originally Posted by swampyankee View Post
    My father -- who was a WW2 combat veteran -- stopped hunting after he decided he was too likely to get shot.
    The ER reception area was a salutary place to put the jackets and their stories, I think.
    We'd get a lot of hunters, autumn and winter, usually with fairly minor injuries after fairly minor accidents - knife cuts, falls, branch-pokes, minor burns and scalds - and they'd be sitting in the waiting area feeling a bit sorry for themselves, and then their gaze would settle on the jackets. When we called them in to fix them up, they'd often be stuffing one of the safety leaflets into their pocket.

    Grant Hutchison

  19. #12439
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Cosmonaut, Astronaut, Taikonaut, Spationaut...
    Long ago, the four space programs lived in harmony— but everything changed when the aliens attacked...
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  20. #12440
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    The media, the space agencies, the people who actually fly in space, ...
    Right. Actually, the reason I asked the question is because it relates a bit to the later discussion between you and Swift. As you rightly point out, we don't call a Chinese teacher a different term than an American teacher. But we do for some special positions, like kings versus shahs versus sultans, for example. And I agree that it's strange that we use different terms for astronauts who are all doing an equivalent job.

    The reason I asked "by who" is that it is not a universal phenomenon. In Western languages it's very common, but in Chinese for example they do not use the word "taikonaut" themselves (I believe they use it now in English PR materials because they learned it from outside China). But in Chinese, they only use 宇航员, whether the astronaut is Chinese or American or Russian. And in Japanese as well, the terms 宇宙飛行士 is used regardless of the nationality or affiliation of the astronaut. I'm not sure if NASA or the ESA themselves use the different terms, but if they do it's probably because they think it sounds "hip" to do so. And also, in French they do not use the term "spationaute" for even their own astronauts, So "astronaut" and "cosmonaut" are actually used in that form when astronauts from those countries talk to people, but "taikonaut" and "spationaut" are not. So it seems like a media thing that the different agencies have picked up on and used.

    Incidentally, personally I wish we had chosen the term "cosmonaut" in English as well, as I feel it's a better descriptor than using the word for "star". Plus I like the sound better.
    As above, so below

  21. #12441
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    I’m an American, but I’d go with “Cosmonaut”, too. In addition to the word being at least as suitable as “Astronaut” etymologically, the Russians Soviets got dibs by sending the first person to orbit.



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  22. #12442
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    The ER reception area was a salutary place to put the jackets and their stories, I think.
    We'd get a lot of hunters, autumn and winter, usually with fairly minor injuries after fairly minor accidents - knife cuts, falls, branch-pokes, minor burns and scalds - and they'd be sitting in the waiting area feeling a bit sorry for themselves, and then their gaze would settle on the jackets. When we called them in to fix them up, they'd often be stuffing one of the safety leaflets into their pocket.

    Grant Hutchison
    Since my EMT days I've thought that spending any significant time around an ER or in an ambulance is an excellent treatment for many things, including excessive drinking, reckless driving, careless gun use, etc. For example, around the third or fourth time someone throws up all over you, the allure of drinking till unconsciousness disappears.

    Some creative judges in the US have made use of this, by sentencing people to an evening or several of observing in an ER for various such offenses.
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  23. #12443
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    My mom worked in an ER before she married my dad, and she's fanatical about seatbelts. It's rubbed off, too; I wouldn't start my car until my firstborn's then-boyfriend buckled his a while back, and the fact that he clearly resented doing so made me slightly suspicious, though by that point other actions of his had already made me inclined to be.
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  24. #12444
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    A "crack" and a "pop" and now my T.V. won't turn on.

    With boxing day sales fast approaching it's not the worst time of year for it to die.

    Netflix fine on other devices, so really all I'll miss is "just turn it on" access to "Eight out of ten cats does countdown".

    First World problems.
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  25. #12445
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    A comic in todays The Comics Curmudgeon uses the phrase "Dead as a door mouse". Ugh. It's a dormouse, folks, named for it's extensive hibernations. And Josh didn't catch it. The phrase should be "Dead as a door nail".
    On the Amuses side of things, I find I can follow the plots of half a dozen soap opera comics entirely adequately just by reading The Comics Curmudgeon.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #12446
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    A "crack" and a "pop" and now my T.V. won't turn on.

    With boxing day sales fast approaching it's not the worst time of year for it to die.

    Netflix fine on other devices, so really all I'll miss is "just turn it on" access to "Eight out of ten cats does countdown".

    First World problems.
    Back in prehistoric times, we had a 13" color TV, with lots of cooling slots on top of the case. We had a plant hanging above it. My wife over-watered the plant and water ran down into the slots. Lots of arcing sparking noises as I ran over and yanked the plug from the wall. We let it sit for a few hours, plugged it in, and it was just fine. Quite surprising, that was.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #12447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    A comic in todays The Comics Curmudgeon uses the phrase "Dead as a door mouse". Ugh. It's a dormouse, folks, named for it's extensive hibernations. And Josh didn't catch it. The phrase should be "Dead as a door nail".
    On the Amuses side of things, I find I can follow the plots of half a dozen soap opera comics entirely adequately just by reading The Comics Curmudgeon.
    Ah, but this is Ed Crankshaft, the King of Malapropisms and Mixed Metaphors. I'm guessing this one was intentional.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

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  28. #12448
    This afternoon someone asked to get the top of entertainment center take off because the tv was too big for it, and had to put on an angle I just wish they told before I put in the tv. Well at least all the wires that went to nowhere have been moved.
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  29. #12449
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    A comic in todays The Comics Curmudgeon uses the phrase "Dead as a door mouse". Ugh. It's a dormouse, folks, named for it's extensive hibernations. And Josh didn't catch it. The phrase should be "Dead as a door nail".
    On the Amuses side of things, I find I can follow the plots of half a dozen soap opera comics entirely adequately just by reading The Comics Curmudgeon.
    Ha. I heard "dead as a dormouse" for the first time about three days ago, in an episode of the British children's TV series Space Patrol, dating from the early 1960s. I presumed it was some strange idiosyncratic phrase of the writer's. A particularly strange phrase, given that the dormouse is famous for not actually being dead, despite appearances.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2019-Dec-17 at 08:41 PM.

  30. #12450
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    When I hear "dormouse", all I think of is the dormouse from the Mad Hatter's Tea Party in Alice.

    "Once upon a time there were three little sisters," the Dormouse began in a great hurry; "and their names were Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie; and they lived at the bottom of a well——"

    "What did they live on?" said Alice, who always took a great interest in questions of eating and drinking.

    "They lived on treacle," said the Dormouse, after thinking a minute or two.

    "They couldn't have done that, you know," Alice gently remarked: "they'd have been ill."

    "So they were," said the Dormouse; "very ill."
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