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Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #10351
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    This might have happened while watching Joker with my sister-in-law who is a super Batman fan. She probably used Limewire to download the movie to watch. Anyway, I was fixing her laptop while the movie was playing on the TV.

    Me: "Er, why is the joker's journal in Italian when the rest of the film is in English?"
    My sister-in-law: "You can read the Joker's journal?"
    Me: "Nevermind. Laptop's fixed... just a couple viruses. You need to get Netflix and upgrade to Vista or something..."
    My sister-in-law: "I couldn't run Limewire on Windows 10."

    I shook my head as she is the reason I have Windows SP3 on a disc, a cd-rom drive and extra memory for old laptops. She's right though. The laptop is kind of a tank.
    Solfe

  2. #10352
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Except he pronounces "Gillian" with a hard "G". Is that usual in the UK?
    In my local SCA chapter, when I still did the SCA, we had a Sir Gillian, who pronounced his with a hard "G." While I grant you we both had brown hair, we were very easy to tell apart in every other particular.

    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Actually, woman colds are the worst. Medical fact.
    They're exactly like man colds, except the affected person comes to work, coughs on everyone, and says repeatedly, "Oooooh, I feel terrible. If I was a man I'd be off work."
    I can probably count on one hand the number of sick days Graham has taken in the eighteen years we've been together. Here in the US, everyone in the service industry tends to come in to work sick, because it's better in the long run for them than getting fired. I've never had a paid sick day in my life, and I'm frankly astonished that Graham's current job gives them to him.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  3. #10353
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    I can probably count on one hand the number of sick days Graham has taken in the eighteen years we've been together. Here in the US, everyone in the service industry tends to come in to work sick, because it's better in the long run for them than getting fired.
    Yes, I know.
    The casual sexism of "man colds" and "man flu" just annoys me enough that I feel obliged to jokingly restore the Cosmic Balance every time I see or hear the expression, even when it's being used by a man. I know I should just accept the fact that women have a few-thousand-years backlog of patronizing sexism to redress, but life is too short to let these things simmer.

    (If I had a penny for every time I've sat at a bedside in the Intensive Care Unit and heard a relative say, "But we thought it was just man flu," I'd have thruppence.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2020-Feb-22 at 06:32 PM. Reason: bracketed

  4. #10354
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    The casual sexism of "man colds" and "man flu" just annoys me enough ...
    My wife just pats me on the head and laughs.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  5. #10355
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    When I got drafted into the US Army, almost the first thing that happened in Basic Training was that everyone got a cold. You're thrown into close proximity with people from all over the country who can provide you with lovely unfamiliar viruses. As if it wasn't bad enough being there.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #10356
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    When I got drafted into the US Army, almost the first thing that happened in Basic Training was that everyone got a cold. You're thrown into close proximity with people from all over the country who can provide you with lovely unfamiliar viruses. As if it wasn't bad enough being there.
    I caught a cold in Basic training (Fort Leonard Wood, MO) and coughed all night, waking up everyone. I was not popular. Later I had a reaction to a typhoid shot, developed a fever of 104oF, and hallucinated that the Army was evaluating "my number" in computers and I would soon know what job I was best equipped for. I ended up in a hospital. Such fun.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  7. #10357
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    When I got drafted into the US Army, almost the first thing that happened in Basic Training was that everyone got a cold. You're thrown into close proximity with people from all over the country who can provide you with lovely unfamiliar viruses. As if it wasn't bad enough being there.
    Same thing happen on university campuses.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
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  8. #10358
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    I caught a cold in Basic training (Fort Leonard Wood, MO) and coughed all night, waking up everyone. I was not popular. Later I had a reaction to a typhoid shot, developed a fever of 104oF, and hallucinated that the Army was evaluating "my number" in computers and I would soon know what job I was best equipped for. I ended up in a hospital. Such fun.
    Guys who'd been there referred to that as "Fort Lost-In-The-Woods".
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  9. #10359
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Guys who'd been there referred to that as "Fort Lost-In-The-Woods".
    They still do.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  10. #10360
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Yes, I know.
    The casual sexism of "man colds" and "man flu" just annoys me enough that I feel obliged to jokingly restore the Cosmic Balance every time I see or hear the expression, even when it's being used by a man. I know I should just accept the fact that women have a few-thousand-years backlog of patronizing sexism to redress, but life is too short to let these things simmer.

    (If I had a penny for every time I've sat at a bedside in the Intensive Care Unit and heard a relative say, "But we thought it was just man flu," I'd have thruppence.)
    I have friends who will tell you that taking care of their sick partners is more work than taking care of their sick children, and of course they're expected to do all their own work while they themselves are sick. That said, I also have female friends who can be utter drama queens about their illnesses and of course Graham, who resents sickness as something that keeps him from doing what he's trying to do and does his level best to ignore it. It turns out casual sexism is pretty much always wrong.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  11. #10361
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    It turns out casual sexism is pretty much always wrong.
    Did it seem that I thought otherwise?

    The specific problem with the "man flu" meme, which makes it more than trivial to me, is that men in Western society are (at the population level) notoriously more reluctant to seek help with their physical and mental health problems than are women. A society that thinks it's acceptable behaviour to belittle any complaints of ill-health that men do make isn't really helping turn that around, as far as I can see.

    Grant Hutchison

  12. #10362
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    The man-cold meme pokes fun at a group of people who can well afford it: white males in the Western world. I am one of them, and it is very funny to me. Do men suffer worse colds than women? No. A lot of men have a streak of big baby in them, me among them. This rightfully deserves a poke. I am big enough to laugh at me. As for the wife waiting on whiny hubby hand and foot, no. My wife and I both work. She pats me on the head, laughs, and goes to work while I sleep it off. When I feel better, I get up and do the housework because to me thats man's work. I am OCD enough to want the house to look MY way, so I vacuum, scoop cat litter, do laundry and dishes, sweep, etc. That's how I want it. In short, man cold jokes are funny, and I laugh at them. I whine a lot, and laughing at one's self is healthy. YMMV, and that's okay.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  13. #10363
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    In my defense, I present the BBC. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VbmbMSrsZVQ
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  14. #10364
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    In my defense, I present the BBC.
    You don't need to defend yourself. You made a joke. I made a joke. Life does not cease to be funny when people die any more than it ceases to be serious when people laugh.

    Grant Hutchison

  15. #10365
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    Equally amusing, is many of those man-cold types may well resort to the “It’s only a flesh wound” trope if they injure themselves. Nah, I don’t need stitches. Hand me the duct tape and I’ll be fine.
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  16. #10366
    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    Equally amusing, is many of those man-cold types may well resort to the “It’s only a flesh wound” trope if they injure themselves. Nah, I don’t need stitches. Hand me the duct tape and I’ll be fine.
    That stereotype has been around for a while, it is medieval way of thinking.
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  17. #10367
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    Most of my "complaining man is accused of man-flu and ignored, but turns out to be really sick" stories end unpleasantly. But here's one that fits the theme of this thread, from my early days in a rural emergency department.

    Late one evening a woman pushes open the door, stomps up to reception, and yells, "My husband needs an X-ray to convince him his leg isn't broken!" Guy walks in slowly behind her, placing his left foot with extreme care and wincing every time he weight-bears.
    On examination, he has a massive bruise on his shin, from a kick while playing football earlier in the day. Seems to be in a heck of a lot of pain, and really doesn't like me gently stressing his tibia. We cart him off to X-ray, and he has a perfectly transverse, undisplaced fracture--he's walking around on a broken leg. Which is ... unusual.
    So I put him in a full-leg plaster, give him a pair of crutches, and walk him out to the waiting room. Where his wife is using the payphone to yell at someone: "He's just being pathetic about a bruise on his leg. And God knows why the [redacted] X-ray is taking so [redacted] long."
    Then she turns around, sees the plaster cast, and yells, "You're [redacted] kidding me! How did you get them to do that?"

    Grant Hutchison

  18. #10368
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    … he's walking around on a broken leg. Which is ... unusual. ...
    When I was instructing soccer referees I ran across an article about play in the FA. It said that a player had been tripped and took a bad fall, breaking his left leg. "He was moved to right wing, the traditional position for an injured player, and continued the match."

    * * * * *

    When I was a few years out of college and working in a chemical manufacturing plant, I woke up one morning feeling not so good. But, being a manly man and a good employee, I sucked it up and went to work. A short time after I got there, a group of us - Al, BJ, Steve and I - were sitting in the office area talking. Steve looked at me quizzically.

    "You don't look so good, Jim."

    "Yeah, I don't feel so good."

    "Well, why don't you go home before you give whatever you have to the rest of us?"

    Good advice, and I've followed it to this day.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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  19. #10369
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    "Well, why don't you go home before you give whatever you have to the rest of us?"

    Good advice, and I've followed it to this day.
    When you work in medicine, that's the order of the day--you don't come to work with your head less than clear, and you don't bring in a disease to your colleagues and patients. There's a general acceptance by all concerned that it's the best and safest option, and it's simply not acceptable to come in to work snivelling and moaning about how unwell you feel.

    Less so, as Gillianren says, with some other employers. The owner of the restaurant I worked in, back in the day, was very much in the "If you don't come in today, don't bother coming in tomorrow" school, with the result that the waiting staff regularly coughed and spluttered over the customers. One day I called in sick with dysentery (actual, culture-proven Flexner dysentery) and he launched into his threatening routine. I told him he needed to look into the implications for his restaurant if it was the source of a dysentery outbreak. I was just getting to the point where I could probably manage without his damn job, assuming I passed my final exams, so it ended with me shouting down the phone, "It's dysentery! Look it up! I need to go now!"

    Grant Hutchison

  20. #10370
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    "It's dysentery! Look it up! I need to go now!"

    Grant Hutchison
    I see what you did there.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  21. #10371
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    When you work in medicine, that's the order of the day--you don't come to work with your head less than clear, and you don't bring in a disease to your colleagues and patients. There's a general acceptance by all concerned that it's the best and safest option, and it's simply not acceptable to come in to work snivelling and moaning about how unwell you feel.
    Grant Hutchison
    You've reminded me of when my mother was volunteer director at a large hospital. She called up one day and said "Everyone at the hospital is sick." She meant the staff, but it sounded kind of funny.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  22. #10372
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Did it seem that I thought otherwise?
    Not you, no. Many, many other people, however.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  23. #10373
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    Don't forget that Saturday marks the 39th birthday of Herman Hollerith.

    He implemented the first punched cards for tabulating data.
    The concept was, of course, important in the development of computers.

    Herman (born 29 Feb 1860, died 17 Nov 1929) has been dead for quite some time, but like that fellow in The Pirates of Penzance, remains youthful in terms of birthdays.

  24. #10374
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    I just reported a misprint (well, more of a compositing error) to the UK's national mapping agency, the Ordnance Survey. Within a day I had an acknowledge, and an undertaking that the error would be corrected in the next round of map revision. So that was good. What amused me is that they particularly thanked me for giving the map coordinates of the error.
    It had never occurred to me that people would report map errors to a mapping agency without giving coordinates--but presumably there's a considerable amount of hassle for the mapmakers when such vague reports come in.

    Grant Hutchison

  25. #10375
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Don't forget that Saturday marks the 39th birthday of Herman Hollerith.

    He implemented the first punched cards for tabulating data.
    The concept was, of course, important in the development of computers.

    Herman (born 29 Feb 1860, died 17 Nov 1929) has been dead for quite some time, but like that fellow in The Pirates of Penzance, remains youthful in terms of birthdays.
    A friend of ours was also born on 29th Feb. and absolutely delights in her youthful number of birthdays and is happy to still be a "teenager".

  26. #10376
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    The famous Italian composer Gioachino Rossini was born Feb. 29, 1792 and died Nov. 13 (Friday the 13th), 1868.

  27. #10377
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    Astronaut Jack Lousma was born on February 29th, 1936, which means that he was 9 when he stayed on the Skylab space station, and 11 when he flew the Space Shuttle.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  28. #10378
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    Speaking of birthdays, I was opening a bag of chips/crisps yesterday and noticed that the "guaranteed fresh until" date was what would have been my mother's 100th birthday. She wasn't born on the 29th. She's been gone 10 years now but frequently visits me in my dreams.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #10379
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    My mom occasionally visits me in my dreams--to shame me about things I'm concerned about. Which I do still have a living mother to do.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  30. #10380
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    I turned 65 this year which means I can buy a lifetime fishing license in my state for a nominal amount (used to be free, but that's a post for the Bugs Me thread.) Anyway, the effective date of the license is Feb. 28, 2020. But I guess the computer at the Georgia Dept. of Natural Resources is required to insert an expiration date so it lists Feb. 28, 2220. That's certainly well past my expiration date!

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