Page 404 of 408 FirstFirst ... 304354394402403404405406 ... LastLast
Results 12,091 to 12,120 of 12224

Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #12091
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,566
    I saw a headline on BBC news that starts with “Fully Jabbed . . .” It means “completed vaccination “ but I picture a human pin cushion when I read that.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  2. #12092
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    39,923
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I saw a headline on BBC news that starts with “Fully Jabbed . . .” It means “completed vaccination “ but I picture a human pin cushion when I read that.
    If a medical professional giving vaccinations was also a sailor o.n a tall ship responsible for a small triangular sail, would that make them a jibber jabber?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  3. #12093
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,193
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I saw a headline on BBC news that starts with “Fully Jabbed . . .” It means “completed vaccination “ but I picture a human pin cushion when I read that.
    I've mentioned before that a lot of healthcare professionals in the UK wish the BBC would stop saying that. They also say "double jabbed", and in a fit of misguided dialectic pandering they replace "jab" with "jag" in their Scottish programming.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  4. #12094
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    32,044
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I have never seen an episode but have read an awful lot of reviews and comments about its awfulness (boom boom) so it was the first one that came to my mind.
    It's definitely not good, but it's nowhere near as bad as its reputation. Its reputation would have you believe the show is fully terrible with no bright spots, and about half the time it's simply mediocre. At least fifteen percent of the time, it's genuinely quite good. Unfortunately, the rest of its time ranges from kind of bad to awful. And it's a fascinating cultural landmark because of what the show says about LA at the time. My co-author and I have decided to highlight the assorted ethnic cuisines of LA, for which purpose I've messaged a couple of friends from high school for their suggestions--they're both from immigrant families. One of them is enthusiastically pressuring her mother to give me family recipes, and another wants to buy a copy when it's done.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  5. #12095
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,823
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    It's definitely not good, but it's nowhere near as bad as its reputation. Its reputation would have you believe the show is fully terrible with no bright spots, and about half the time it's simply mediocre. At least fifteen percent of the time, it's genuinely quite good. Unfortunately, the rest of its time ranges from kind of bad to awful. And it's a fascinating cultural landmark because of what the show says about LA at the time. My co-author and I have decided to highlight the assorted ethnic cuisines of LA, for which purpose I've messaged a couple of friends from high school for their suggestions--they're both from immigrant families. One of them is enthusiastically pressuring her mother to give me family recipes, and another wants to buy a copy when it's done.
    The recipes idea sounds like it might be better than the show. You should post some of them on here once you are finished.

  6. #12096
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,193
    A friend who is still gainfully employed has spent the day wading through curricula vitarum from job applicants. She reports that one person had chosen to record that they had previously struggled with "low selfie steam". I can see how that works.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  7. #12097
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,857
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    A friend who is still gainfully employed has spent the day wading through curricula vitarum from job applicants. She reports that one person had chosen to record that they had previously struggled with "low selfie steam". I can see how that works.

    Grant Hutchison
    They also apparently struggle with spelling and/or autocorrect.

    "Selfie steam" sounds like some kind of steam punk way of taking images of yourself.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  8. #12098
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,193
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    "Selfie steam" sounds like some kind of steam punk way of taking images of yourself.
    In my head, it's either an inability to muster any interest in taking a selfie, or an inability to look hot enough in a selfie. Either way, I imagine it would be a social media catastrophe.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  9. #12099
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    10,114
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    In my head, it's either an inability to muster any interest in taking a selfie, or an inability to look hot enough in a selfie. Either way, I imagine it would be a social media catastrophe.

    Grant Hutchison
    I love “selfie steam” it is quite poetic, in compressing a whole set of meanings into two words, maybe we could add
    “Lo! Selphie Steam!”
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  10. #12100
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,471
    Low Selfie Steam is the effect when you try to take an ever so necessary sitting-at-a-table-with-meal-in-front-of-me selfie but hold the phone too close to the hot food, resulting in a fogged up lens.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  11. #12101
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,907
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    A friend who is still gainfully employed has spent the day wading through curricula vitarum from job applicants. She reports that one person had chosen to record that they had previously struggled with "low selfie steam". I can see how that works.

    Grant Hutchison
    In my High School Latin class, there was one boy who wrote “ludacris” (like the rapper) as the translation of an equivalent Latin word where it was supposed to be “ludicrous”.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  12. #12102
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,857
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    In my High School Latin class, there was one boy who wrote “ludacris” (like the rapper) as the translation of an equivalent Latin word where it was supposed to be “ludicrous”.

    Now I have the thought that someone needs to rap in Latin, and I'm too scared to Google it, because I suspect someone has.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  13. #12103
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    10,114
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post

    Now I have the thought that someone needs to rap in Latin, and I'm too scared to Google it, because I suspect someone has.
    By memory, from verse and worse:

    Civile, si ergo,
    Fortibus es in ero,
    Temsint buses temsis trux,
    Vatis inem,
    Causan dux.

    Makes a good rap, no knowledge£ of Latin required.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  14. #12104
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,510
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    A friend who is still gainfully employed has spent the day wading through curricula vitarum from job applicants. She reports that one person had chosen to record that they had previously struggled with "low selfie steam". I can see how that works.

    Grant Hutchison
    I have in my binder of photocopied office humor a copy of a resume (US version of a CV) all done in cartoon artwork. And poetry. It includes the author's name and phone number. He depicts himself throughout as a fox. The original was said to have been "very colorful", but of course 1980's copiers couldn't do that.
    Hmm, I wonder where that binder is. It followed me through several jobs but finally got taken home as much of the content was offensive.

    Now that I think of it, my "buccaneer" joke a few weeks ago (four sweet corn for four dollars) is in it. Oh, and of course the joke is no longer valid because the price at Safeway is now four for FIVE dollars!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #12105
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North Tonawanda, NY
    Posts
    3,998
    I don't get how anything about self-esteem, even spelled correctly, has any reason to be in a CV.

  16. #12106
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    15,062
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    I don't get how anything about self-esteem, even spelled correctly, has any reason to be in a CV.
    Maybe she was applying for a job in a "think positive" coaching company.

    But seriously, I agree, it's quite unusual. I've never heard of anyone mentioning that, even though it's actually a very important consideration when employing someone in many professions.
    As above, so below

  17. #12107
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,193
    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    I don't get how anything about self-esteem, even spelled correctly, has any reason to be in a CV.
    Back in the Dark Ages when I was applying for medical jobs, likewise. But nowadays Personal Statements on medical CVs often include a sentence or two about dealing with emotional challenges or other personal issues. It's certainly relevant in medicine, and I agree with Jens that it would be relevant in many other fields too, if people could bring themselves to talk about it.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  18. #12108
    This afternoon I was reminded about an old friend. The way to tell a good programmer was by how often they crashed a system. A while ago I tried to go thru a few code academy courses like HYML, Java and Javascript and maybe a couple others. I needed to take a break for a while because the s broke on the keyboard and now I have a replacement keyboard I started again. I finally got to the while loops on Java and when running the first lesson it took forever and then internet explorer went into not responding mode. Then I found out an adobe program that I downloaded in the trial mode i while ago but could not afford to get the full version was having problems, then I plugged and took out the battery.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  19. #12109
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    6,188
    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    ...The way to tell a good programmer was by how often they crashed a system. ....
    If that's true, then I could be a legend! I've crashed university systems, nuclear energy systems, Air Force / Army and NASA systems.
    Not at important times, thankfully.

  20. #12110
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,471
    I've crashed a huge dredge vessel while in operation. And when I say crashed, I don't just mean a software freeze. Nono, all pumps instant off while feeding a loooong sludge pipe. Nobody cares about the programmer, and when they do, he's walking the plank.

    Kids, don't run a while loop that doesn't reach its end condition with certainty on a live system.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  21. #12111
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    6,188
    I did work on a launch holdfire system, something that involved exhaustive checking and counter-checking. There was even a "watchdog timer" to quality check the system and safely bring it down immediately for any irregularity.

    After that I was going to work on something that involved a fail-safe for explosive ordinance, but was needed for some weather application that did sound safer.

  22. #12112
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    10,114
    In the online lecture about the Apollo control computer, there was a watchdog timer and it is a very good idea on any real time computing system. They also introduced on Apollo regular data dumps so that when rebooted, it was as close as possible to the state it was last in.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  23. #12113
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,510
    My wife did a Google image search for "scoter chicks". A scoter being a type of sea-going duck. She got "scooter chicks". Good thing safe search was on.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #12114
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,193
    "Scoter ducklings" works better. Do you call baby ducks "chicks" in the USA?

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  25. #12115
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    14,254
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    "Scoter ducklings" works better. Do you call baby ducks "chicks" in the USA?
    They're commonly referred to as ducklings over here but "chick" is often used as a generic term when one doesn't know or recall the specific name. People are generally less familiar with gosling (unless it's Ryan, the actor) and are even less likely to know about cygnet, colt, keet, or puffling. I also think most adults forget about hatchling, nestling, fledgling, or even juvenile not long after leaving school...if not that day's class.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  26. #12116
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,510
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    "Scoter ducklings" works better. Do you call baby ducks "chicks" in the USA?

    Grant Hutchison
    Agreed, but she was trying to figure out what some seabird young were from a picture and tried various types with "chicks". They weren't scoters anyhow.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #12117
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,510
    Google just sent my monthly list of where I've been.
    Wait...Bremerton? Why would I have been to Bremerton?
    Oh yeah. I had a root canal!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  28. #12118
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,193
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Google just sent my monthly list of where I've been.
    Nothing at all sinister about that.
    But I do often wonder if turning off the location tracking on my phone actually stops Google tracking it, or just stops them revealing to me that they're tracking it.

    So I'm amused by the anti-vax conspiracy theory that the Covid vaccine has implanted us all with tiny tracking devices. That boat sailed quite a long time ago.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Aug-06 at 11:16 AM.
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  29. #12119
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,757
    Haven’t you heard? Cognitive dissonance is all the rage.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  30. #12120
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,193
    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    They're commonly referred to as ducklings over here but "chick" is often used as a generic term when one doesn't know or recall the specific name. People are generally less familiar with gosling (unless it's Ryan, the actor) and are even less likely to know about cygnet, colt, keet, or puffling. I also think most adults forget about hatchling, nestling, fledgling, or even juvenile not long after leaving school...if not that day's class.
    Sorry, I seem to have missed this. Thanks for clarifying. Duckling, gosling and cygnet are pretty standard in the UK (the latter often disappointingly spelled "signet"). Also eaglet and owlet. Others, not so much, especially those of birds not native to the British Isles.

    Chick
    likewise generic, and there's a tendency to call all young deer fawns, which in Scotland means you're wrong almost all the time.

    And, for some reason, almost no-one seems to know that the correct name for a young pterodactyl is a flapling.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Aug-06 at 03:30 PM.
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

Similar Threads

  1. Really trivial stuff that bugs you
    By Trebuchet in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 15168
    Last Post: Today, 12:45 PM
  2. Trivial coincidences from everyday life.
    By Buttercup in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 171
    Last Post: 2012-Nov-02, 09:08 PM
  3. Trivial Relief:
    By Moose in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 2006-Jul-19, 01:20 PM
  4. Bad Astronomy in Trivial Pursuit, Genus 5 Edition
    By tracer in forum Small Media at Large
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 2005-May-12, 01:52 PM
  5. Trivial lawsuits are stupid, but listen to my story...
    By Brady Yoon in forum Off-Topic Babbling
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 2005-Apr-28, 01:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •