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Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #11671
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    You never told us about your Australian ancestry.
    I expect there is a joke there, but I’m afraid it went right over my head. (And Australia strikes me as a nice country, but my ancestors came over from Europe in the 1800s - English, Dutch, French, and some others).

    Cats...do they love us or do they try to get us up to their standards?
    I believe they see us as big, funny looking cats. And while some are aloof, I have no doubt many have strong affection for us.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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  2. #11672
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    There is this cliché that a) in Australia every animal tries to kill you and b) Australians have a habit of going after deadly animals barehanded. And while I won't say that cliché is true, I will say that our very manly seamen were still very glad to have some Aussies around when working in the jungle of Papua.

    When we had cats, they had all the cat habits but some of them also quite clearly just seemed to like us a lot. An awful lot. And one of the more reserved ones knew to ask us for help when needed. I think cats are quite independent, direct and like things their way, which makes them seem less loving than they really are at times.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  3. #11673
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    Min caught a fly yesterday, mostly. (I had to help.)
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    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  4. #11674
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    Last night while I couldn't sleep I was thinking how the words "mild" and "wild" are opposites, and you can go from one to the other just by inverting the first letter.

  5. #11675
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpatz View Post
    Last night while I couldn't sleep I was thinking how the words "mild" and "wild" are opposites, and you can go from one to the other just by inverting the first letter.
    "Mild Seven" is a brand of cigarettes somewhere or over, and once sponsored a Formula One team. When racing in countries where tobacco advertising was prohibited, they did just that.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #11676
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    Any pictures of that? I can't remember seeing that one. Similar things were done though, such as Lucky Strike becoming Look Alike.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2021-Apr-16 at 06:37 PM.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  7. #11677
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    I watched a YouTube video and learned a new word, the “onosecond.” That’s the second after you make a devastating typo or mistake (especially well known among programmers that don’t do backups), and you can only say “O . . . NO!”

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  8. #11678
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    The onosecond is omnipresent when software development uses the same visual layout for the production and development environment. Made a test page with the subject "dogfood recipes"? Tested "mailto:*@company.com" code? Welcome to the onosecond.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  9. #11679
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    In today's mail, I got three books from a used book service, sent from three different cities. I had ordered two books on baseball history and one on horror movies.

    I noted that one book came from a shop in Cooperstown NY!
    However, it wasn't either of the baseball books.

  10. #11680
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    Memory is sometimes so odd.
    A couple of months ago I read a book about Wally Herbert's epic 464-day dog-sled crossing of the Arctic Ocean, Alaska to Svalbard via the geographical North Pole. I wrote a review of it for the blog, including a brief mention of the start and end points. Landfall in Svalbard was achieved by only half the party, who managed to skip across the moving, flexing sea-ice to set foot on a tiny island called Vesle Tavleøya.

    So I scheduled the blog post, and thought no more about it. Today, it finally went live, and a notification to that effect popped up in my email inbox. And at that moment, without reading more than the title of the notification, I thought: I've been to Vesle Tavleøya! And I have, back in 1999, completely ignorant at the time of its connection to Herbert's Arctic crossing.

    So I managed to not recognize the island's name while I was reading and writing about it recently, but to carry it around in my head (unobserved, as it were) until it popped back into conscious memory, now properly linked to my own experience, and triggered by no more than seeing the title of the blog post I'd written. What's that about?

    (It did mean that, a couple of hours after the post went live, I was able to append a photograph of the island. But why all that didn't happen at the original time of writing is a mystery to me.)

    Grant Hutchison

  11. #11681
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    The associations of memory and recall seem pretty much a random crapshoot, in my case. I can describe in detail a scene from the original Star Trek in a rerun that I haven't seen in decades, and forget my first cousin's name.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  12. #11682
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    I remember my first cousin's name. Because she died of Covid-19 over a year ago. Sorry for the downer in this thread.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #11683
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    Speaking of Star Trek, I’ve been amused seeing more rooms and interior backgrounds in YouTube videos that look a lot like original Star Trek interior shots. It doesn’t seem to be a case of trying to emulate the look of the show. Rather, it is simply the fact that multicolor LED lighting has become cheap and popular so I now see rooms not lit in bland off-white, but very much like the colorful Star Trek interiors - and with even more colors. Add a large video display (a typical present day TV) on the wall and the similarities are uncanny. It’s funny that the later series got away from original ST lighting and we are moving towards it.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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  14. #11684
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    The associations of memory and recall seem pretty much a random crapshoot, in my case. I can describe in detail a scene from the original Star Trek in a rerun that I haven't seen in decades, and forget my first cousin's name.
    I probably watched Star Trek more than any other series (including later ST series) so it isn’t a surprise when I remember a lot of things about it. It wasn’t just that there wasn’t much other SF, but that other shows typically were worse than a poor third season ST episode. And Star Trek was a pretty short series, so when shown five times a week it wouldn’t take long to go through it. Typically it would be run for awhile with a number of repeats of the entire series, giving me enough time to get tired of it, then taken off the air for a few years, then have another run, rinse and repeat. The absence would give me enough time to be willing to watch it again. Not so much anymore with so much else to watch.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  15. #11685
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    That brings up another thought - the different viewing habits you have with just a few channels, no video recording or DVDs or video on demand. I’ve been in a place with just one channel, the place where I lived the longest had the (then) three commercial networks, PBS and one independent that ran all the old stuff in syndication. I was amazed visiting LA, they had seven or eight channels. What could you do with that many?

    Under those conditions you either end up watching a lot of the same stuff whenever it comes on (not when you decide to) or you do something else, and much of that was pre-home computer too.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  16. #11686
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    If anything, I watch less TV now than I did during the '70s and '80s, when we had just three, then four, channels in the UK.
    I do appreciate the opportunity for asynchronous viewing--back in the day it was just routine to miss series episodes if you had a holiday trip or a social engagement. Then again, I do remember the satisfaction of figuring out what must have happened during your absence: "Ooooh, do you think X has maybe killed Y?"
    I think our second VCR allowed us to record by time and date, so we could leave the TV set to a particular channel, and record one or two episodes while we were away. Then the miracle of PlusCodes arrived, though occasionally you'd come home to discover that the PlusCode you'd copied out of the newspaper had recorded thirty-five seconds of Gaelic programming at 06:37.
    Tell that to young people nowadays, and they won't believe you.

    But I still don't understand what people do with so many channels and streaming services.

    Grant Hutchison

  17. #11687
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    That brings up another thought - the different viewing habits you have with just a few channels, no video recording or DVDs or video on demand. I’ve been in a place with just one channel, the place where I lived the longest had the (then) three commercial networks, PBS and one independent that ran all the old stuff in syndication. I was amazed visiting LA, they had seven or eight channels. What could you do with that many?
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    But I still don't understand what people do with so many channels and streaming services.
    Find things they want to watch that aren't necessarily what other people want to? I grew up in LA--we got cable when I was eight or nine, I think, relatively early in the popularity of cable TV. One of the independent channels played a lot of reruns from the '50s and '60s that the other channels didn't. I watched Gidget and Batman on that channel, shows friends of mine who grew up in other places didn't have the chance to watch. Similarly, I have access right now to the Criterion Channel, which lets me watch movies I couldn't watch in other places. Yes, there are people who have so many streaming services themselves that I don't know what they actually spend their time watching and if they have time to make all of them financially worth it. But for example I don't have the ESPN streaming service because I wouldn't use it, and there are plenty of people who can't live without it. With cable, even basic cable, there were always channels I simply never watched--and channels I didn't have that I would've liked because they were things I was actually interested in.

    In fact, yesterday I was watching old Columbo episodes on IMDb.TV, a free streaming service kept free with commercials. Because, sure, Columbo. And one of the commercials was for an insect-based dog food. This made sense to me, actually, since pet food is a huge driver of climate change, and switching animals to insect-based protein, if it's sufficient nutrition, sounds like a good idea. Cats certainly don't have a taboo against eating insects, as I know from watching Min hunt flies. The only problem was the brand name. Jiminy.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  18. #11688
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Find things they want to watch that aren't necessarily what other people want to?
    I guess so. My difficulty is in imagining myself in a situation in which I think, Oooooh, if only I had access to something I want to watch. My problem is, Oooooh, I'll be dead before I can get around to watching half the stuff that already strikes me as interesting. And that's just on the free streaming service from two UK national broadcasters.

    Grant Hutchison

  19. #11689
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I guess so. My difficulty is in imagining myself in a situation in which I think, Oooooh, if only I had access to something I want to watch. My problem is, Oooooh, I'll be dead before I can get around to watching half the stuff that already strikes me as interesting. And that's just on the free streaming service from two UK national broadcasters.

    Grant Hutchison
    Heck, I feel that way looking at the DVD shelves at the library!
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  20. #11690
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    I just watched an NSF video from Boca Chica, featuring TWO robo-dogs. I kept expecting them to sniff each other's butts.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #11691
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I just watched an NSF video from Boca Chica, featuring TWO robo-dogs. I kept expecting them to sniff each other's butts.

    That will be Boston Dynamics next upgrade.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  22. #11692
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I just watched an NSF video from Boca Chica, featuring TWO robo-dogs. I kept expecting them to sniff each other's butts.
    Our most advanced technology at work.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  23. #11693
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    If anything, I watch less TV now than I did during the '70s and '80s, when we had just three, then four, channels in the UK.
    I do appreciate the opportunity for asynchronous viewing--back in the day it was just routine to miss series episodes if you had a holiday trip or a social engagement. Then again, I do remember the satisfaction of figuring out what must have happened during your absence: "Ooooh, do you think X has maybe killed Y?"
    Kids today don't understand the stress of running full speed back to the living room from the kitchen (or bathroom!) after your sibling yells, "The show's back on!"
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  24. #11694
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    Kids today don't understand the stress of running full speed back to the living room from the kitchen (or bathroom!) after your sibling yells, "The show's back on!"
    In my Accident & Emergency days, I treated injuries arising from both those scenarios. (Honestly, you don't want to know.)

    Grant Hutchison

  25. #11695
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Find things they want to watch that aren't necessarily what other people want to? I grew up in LA--we got cable when I was eight or nine, I think, relatively early in the popularity of cable TV. ...
    We were living in Austin when the original Star Trek started. It was carried by the local NBC affiliate, which was a UHF station. Our TV had UHF channels, but the neighbor's TV didn't, so once a week they came to our house for a viewing party.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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  26. #11696
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I guess so. My difficulty is in imagining myself in a situation in which I think, Oooooh, if only I had access to something I want to watch. My problem is, Oooooh, I'll be dead before I can get around to watching half the stuff that already strikes me as interesting. And that's just on the free streaming service from two UK national broadcasters.
    The (free) streaming service I just downloaded wasn't, "Ooooooh, I don't have enough to watch," it was, "Hey, this service has a film directed by the person I'm writing about for today whose silent French movies I've never seen before." If you have interest in a certain genre or what have you, the streaming service is just providing you with the viewing you're most interested in.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  27. #11697
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    The (free) streaming service I just downloaded wasn't, "Ooooooh, I don't have enough to watch," it was, "Hey, this service has a film directed by the person I'm writing about for today whose silent French movies I've never seen before." If you have interest in a certain genre or what have you, the streaming service is just providing you with the viewing you're most interested in.
    Sure, if I had a particular reason to watch a particular movie by a particular date, then I'd probably end up doing something similar. But I have no deadlines, self-imposed or otherwise, and stuff I'm interested to watch is already available to me in volumes I can't hope to get through without giving up other stuff that also interests me. So my viewing backlog grows year on year, and when I think about it, I find it slightly oppressive. So the last thing I need in my life is more viewing options.

    If you want to ruin my day, give me a gift of a large, interesting box-set.

    Grant Hutchison

  28. #11698
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    For the first time ever, they restructured the Oscars last night so that the last award given was Best Actor. It was quite clear that the idea had been that the voters would give it to Chadwick Boseman, and we'd end on a memorable note because posthumous Oscars are rare and Boseman was much beloved and died quite young.

    The voters did not oblige. Now, I've seen a grand total of seven nominees--including two of the shorts--and nothing up in a major category, so I don't have much of an opinion on whether Anthony Hopkins gave a better performance or not. But Hopkins wasn't there and they weren't having people give speeches for people who weren't either there or on a video feed from somewhere else, so there was no big heartwarming speech at the end. No memory of someone who hid his diagnosis to keep making movies until the end. Just . . . I summed it up to the friend I was messaging through the ceremony as a damp squib.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  29. #11699
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    For the first time ever, they restructured the Oscars last night so that the last award given was Best Actor. It was quite clear that the idea had been that the voters would give it to Chadwick Boseman, and we'd end on a memorable note because posthumous Oscars are rare and Boseman was much beloved and died quite young.

    The voters did not oblige. Now, I've seen a grand total of seven nominees--including two of the shorts--and nothing up in a major category, so I don't have much of an opinion on whether Anthony Hopkins gave a better performance or not. But Hopkins wasn't there and they weren't having people give speeches for people who weren't either there or on a video feed from somewhere else, so there was no big heartwarming speech at the end. No memory of someone who hid his diagnosis to keep making movies until the end. Just . . . I summed it up to the friend I was messaging through the ceremony as a damp squib.
    I did not see either Anthony Hopkins' nor Chadwick Boseman's movie, so I have no opinion about who gave a better performance. But I've heard or read several news channels this morning say that Chadwick Boseman was "snubbed". That seems unfair to me. Several sources define snub along the lines of "rebuff, ignore, or spurn disdainfully". The use of "snubbed" implies negative things for which they offered no evidence for.

    Boseman was a terrific actor and his death was tragic. But maybe the voters just thought Hopkins gave a better performance.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  30. #11700
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    Oh, I definitely don't have an opinion on the quality of the movies. I've hardly seen any of the nominees, in part because of the kids and in part because of my burnout--it's really hard to find the time and focus to watch a drama about a serious topic, you know? I just think they were hoping to end on a particular note and didn't.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

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