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Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #6901
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Thanks to the wonders of Cracked.com, I have now learned that paternosters are a thing. A horrifying thing to be sure, but a thing.
    I recall on one of the early eps of Star Trek TOS, the Enterprise was equipped with one of these, and a background crewman used it to arrive on deck.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  2. #6902
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I haven't yet seen an escalator that will take your head off if you do it wrong. And I'm feeling a very strange desire to ride on a paternoster!
    I rode in one in Copenhagen in the 1970's, the one in the article I think, - very strange and with my natural clumsiness a little scary. I see that there are at least 2 still operating in Copenhagen.
    Last edited by ozduck; 2017-Feb-02 at 08:44 AM. Reason: Reading Comprehension

  3. #6903
    Groundhog day, or it will winter no matter what the rodent says day.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  4. #6904
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    Quote Originally Posted by astrotimer View Post
    Groundhog day, or it will winter no matter what the rodent says day.
    Around here, just six more weeks of winter would be great. I think our groundhogs are deciding between six and twelve...
    Conserve energy. Commute with the Hamiltonian.

  5. #6905
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    'Round these parts, we call it Marmot Day, 'cause...you know...no groundhogs.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  6. #6906
    Better than Marmite day.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  7. #6907
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    At our house, we call it "our anniversary."
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  8. #6908
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    'Round these parts, we call it Marmot Day, 'cause...you know...no groundhogs.
    Here, we call it "February the second" - no groundhogs, no marmots, and, well, a temperate maritime climate. Hereabouts, if you don't like the weather there'll be more along in just a few minutes.

    Grant Hutchison

  9. #6909
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Hereabouts, if you don't like the weather there'll be more along in just a few minutes.
    We have a similar sentiment here. If you don't like the weather, wait a few minutes. We also have only three seasons: winter, break up, and construction.
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    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  10. #6910
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    Ah....

    " Groundhog Day " . I got out of the Navy on groundhog day Happy Days.

  11. #6911
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    Quote Originally Posted by astrotimer View Post
    Groundhog day, or it will winter no matter what the rodent says day.
    And people always act like 12 more weeks is a bad thing. Oh no, how horrible to have winter weather in winter!

  12. #6912
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    The groundhog poofed out of existence today because this winter still hasn't even started. I miss winters.

    Back to amusement: people at, as far as I can tell, every single inhabited location on Earth seem to always swear that the weather there is more fickle than it is anywhere else. That "wait, it'll change" saying is equally specific to everywhere.

  13. #6913
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    And people always act like 12 more weeks is a bad thing. Oh no, how horrible to have winter weather in winter!
    You actually need snow for somethings.Like getting sap out of maple trees first you need water to get in to the roots then to flow up the tree.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  14. #6914
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    And people always act like 12 more weeks is a bad thing. Oh no, how horrible to have winter weather in winter!
    Uh, six more weeks. Unless Punxsutawney Phil is having a two-for-one sale.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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  15. #6915
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    The groundhog poofed out of existence today because this winter still hasn't even started. I miss winters.

    Back to amusement: people at, as far as I can tell, every single inhabited location on Earth seem to always swear that the weather there is more fickle than it is anywhere else. That "wait, it'll change" saying is equally specific to everywhere.
    Not a lot of the places I've been. I've had people ask me how I could plan an outdoor activity a couple of weeks ahead, not knowing what the weather will be like on the day. When I told them that I've had days when I've shifted between waterproof clothing and a t-shirt four times in eight hours, they just laughed and thought I was making it up. You get that, predictably enough, in desert regions in South America, Africa and Central Asia, but I've had the "outdoor activity" discussion with Maltese friends.

    Grant Hutchison

  16. #6916
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    I grew up in LA. No one there ever said the weather would change if you waited five minutes; that, to most people who move there, is part of the point of living in LA--you move there for the weather. Then again, I moved here for the weather, where there's a reason we dress in layers.
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  17. #6917
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    Two phrases that I believe are primarily Scottish. (But would be interested to know if they're familiar expressions elsewhere.)
    I was in our local bakery the other day, and after handing over a woman's order the assistant asked her if there was anything else she needed. "I've half a mind for a buttery," she replied. A "buttery" is a local variety of bread roll, and the woman wasn't sure whether she wanted one or not. What is amusing to me is that she could have said, "I'm in two minds about a buttery," meaning exactly the same thing.

    Grant Hutchison

  18. #6918
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    Both of those phrases are common in the USA. I've seen a "demotivational" poster reading "If you have half a mind to work here, that's all it takes." "Buttery", on the other hand, is a new one to me, but sounds delicious and fattening.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #6919
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    "A half-mind is a bit-of-a-shame to waste."

  20. #6920
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Both of those phrases are common in the USA.
    Ah, that's interesting. A couple of English folk have expressed puzzlement over the phrase, which was what was making me wonder if it was a Scottish concoction. It's a state of mind also expressed by the verb "to swither".

    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    "Buttery", on the other hand, is a new one to me, but sounds delicious and fattening.
    Think of a less flakey croissant, with more salt and more fat, flattened into an irregular disc a couple of centimetres thick and maybe fifteen centimetres across. Like most Scottish cuisine, a significant cardiac risk in a paper bag.

    Grant Hutchison

  21. #6921
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    "Swither"! Rhymes with "dither", and would appear to be a synonym.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  22. #6922
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    "Swither"! Rhymes with "dither", and would appear to be a synonym.
    As usual, although you could get the sense of either from "vacillate", there are usage differences.
    Swither is less anxiety-provoking than dither. Dithering makes you (and those around you) feel tense as time passes, because a decision is required very soon. In contrast, swithering is a harmless, fairly relaxed and potentially even enjoyable process - you might swither between several possibilities for a summer holiday destination for next year, for instance, or the name for a baby that isn't due for several months.

    Grant Hutchison

  23. #6923
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    I recall on one of the early eps of Star Trek TOS, the Enterprise was equipped with one of these, and a background crewman used it to arrive on deck.
    I must have missed that...

  24. #6924
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    As usual, although you could get the sense of either from "vacillate", there are usage differences.
    Swither is less anxiety-provoking than dither. Dithering makes you (and those around you) feel tense as time passes, because a decision is required very soon. In contrast, swithering is a harmless, fairly relaxed and potentially even enjoyable process - you might swither between several possibilities for a summer holiday destination for next year, for instance, or the name for a baby that isn't due for several months.

    Grant Hutchison
    OK, makes sense. I'm a mechanical engineer. I've heard "dither" applied to constant small motions which induce rapid excessive wear in a small area. It's Not A Good Thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    I must have missed that...
    Me too. Can anyone provide a clip?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #6925
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Two phrases that I believe are primarily Scottish. (But would be interested to know if they're familiar expressions elsewhere.)
    I was in our local bakery the other day, and after handing over a woman's order the assistant asked her if there was anything else she needed. "I've half a mind for a buttery," she replied. A "buttery" is a local variety of bread roll, and the woman wasn't sure whether she wanted one or not. What is amusing to me is that she could have said, "I'm in two minds about a buttery," meaning exactly the same thing.

    Grant Hutchison
    Does "in two minds" mean she's undecided about wanting to eat it?

    That phrase is from years ago in childhood. That's how my hillbilly kin meant it (I think )
    Dip me in ink and toss me to the Poets.

  26. #6926
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buttercup View Post
    Does "in two minds" mean she's undecided about wanting to eat it?
    She meant she wasn't sure if she wanted to buy one or not.

    Grant Hutchison

  27. #6927
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    We have a similar sentiment here. If you don't like the weather, wait a few minutes. We also have only three seasons: winter, break up, and construction.
    I believe it originated from Mark Twain talking about New England.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  28. #6928
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Me too. Can anyone provide a clip?
    It's just a brief background shot, I can't recall what episode it's from.

    I've tried various Googles and Memory Alpha, to no avail.
    Last edited by Noclevername; 2017-Feb-04 at 05:26 AM.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  29. #6929
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    "Half a mind" was certainly in general use in my parents & in-laws pre- 1930's generations, but less so know.

  30. #6930
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    I have a prescription that reads, "Take one pill twice a day, by mouth.".

    The first thing that pops into my head is the gag from The Road to Wellville:

    Doctor: Give this man 15 gallons of yogurt.
    Patient: I can't eat 15 gallons!
    Doctor: Oh, its not going in that end.
    Solfe

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