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Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #9571
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    I was reminiscing with my son about a trip to Disney. He was 13 at the time and had recently got his hands on a giant bottle of Axe Body Spray, For 13 Year Old Men™. I told him not to bring it because it would leak. He decided to put it in his carry on bag, so he could see if it leaked. It did.

    Queue up the comedy routine. At the airport, my son skipped and dodged his way to the front of the security line, dropped his bag on the conveyor and asked to go through the scanner. They were slightly amused by this and eventually let him (see the next bit). My wife and I were busy looking for him behind us, so he was effectively alone. After his bag set off the security people manning the X-ray machine - it was wet and has a jug of Axe Body Spray, For 13 Year Old Men™ inside - he got his hands on it to show them his giant bottle. They might have been amused by all of this, but then he sprayed two different TSA people with it. Twice.

    At that point, my wife and I got close enough to see my son was causing a ruckus and made the mistake of waving to him. They pulled us out of line and re-screened my son, sans Axe Body Spray, For 13 Year Old Men™ and then screened the rest of us. The poor woman who was tasked with directing this circus kept catching the smell of Axe and couldn't hold her "serious face". She ran through a litany of complaints, but kept getting stuck at the point where my son sprayed the TSA agents. While we did get the full TSA public patdown treatment, I get the feeling it should have been far worse. If only it wasn't a kid doing all this.

    My son is one of those smooth, but not fast talking kids you want to trust even though you probably shouldn't.
    Solfe

  2. #9572
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    My son is one of those smooth, but not fast talking kids you want to trust even though you probably shouldn't.
    I predict an extremely interesting future for you and your family.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  3. #9573
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    I predict an extremely interesting future for you and your family.
    What's really interesting is, my son is learning to fly now and has "clearance" to enter the secured spaces in the local airport, including a hidden entrance. When he says the word "clearance", you can hear every letter is capitalized.
    Solfe

  4. #9574
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    What's really interesting is, my son is learning to fly now and has "clearance" to enter the secured spaces in the local airport, including a hidden entrance. When he says the word "clearance", you can hear every letter is capitalized.
    A smooth talking trouble-prone pilot? Does he have a Wookiee travelling with him at any time?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  5. #9575
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Our area highways have digital sign boards that post travel notices, PSAs, Amber Alerts and Silver Alerts. That last one is about an older person who has wandered off in the family car. I joke with my wife that when I see one of those I read it to make sure it isn't me.

    Well, today it happened. I read the message:

    SILVER ALERT
    GRAY FORD ESCAPE

    Hey, I drive a gray Ford Escape! ...
    I told this to my wife when I got home. She replied, "You drive a silver Escape."

    I'm glad I didn't turn myself in. That would have been embarrassing.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

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  6. #9576
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I told this to my wife when I got home. She replied, "You drive a silver Escape."

    I'm glad I didn't turn myself in. That would have been embarrassing.
    So, an elderly person disappeared in a "Silver Escape"?

  7. #9577
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    I told this to my wife when I got home. She replied, "You drive a silver Escape."

    I'm glad I didn't turn myself in. That would have been embarrassing.
    I can't even tell the difference between pink and purple unless it's barbie pink versus eggplant purple. That's why my cars are black or red. I know those colors.

  8. #9578
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I can't even tell the difference between pink and purple unless it's barbie pink versus eggplant purple. That's why my cars are black or red. I know those colors.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  9. #9579
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    In that illustration, "Seam Foam" should be "Sea Foam." Still got the editorial touch, now and then.

  10. #9580
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    In that illustration, "Seam Foam" should be "Sea Foam." Still got the editorial touch, now and then.
    Seam foam is what sticks out of the cracks in an old faux-leather couch.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  11. #9581
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Isaac Newton missed out on pink. But then, he's the only guy who can see indigo.

  12. #9582
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    It's only seven because seven was a mystical number anyway.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  13. #9583
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    It's only seven because seven was a mystical number anyway.
    Newton was very taken with the books of John Dee, mathematician, astrologer and general mystic who is said to have signed himself 007. So it's plausible but if you take a big prism to get the rainbow, I think you can see the zone where indigo would sit plus other colours, but of course these are not only subjective but might be culturally biassed i.e. learned in some way.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  14. #9584
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    I believe that the indigo plant provided a popular dye for fabrics at the time, and so was a better-known "color" than it is now.

  15. #9585
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Newton was very taken with the books of John Dee, mathematician, astrologer and general mystic who is said to have signed himself 007.
    No, that was me.

  16. #9586
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    No, that was me.
    To reference another thread, “No, not our Roger Moore.”


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  17. #9587
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    The one to sign "007" is every other owner of a custom license plate. I wonder how someone who apparently is smart enough to be rich, can be so lacking in imagination that they come no further than "my initials 007".

  18. #9588
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    I believe that the indigo plant provided a popular dye for fabrics at the time, and so was a better-known "color" than it is now.
    If I am not mistaken, indigo dye was a valuable commodity in those days, and that could have been a motive for making its hue a seventh named color. Colors such as cyan and chartreuse could have been additional candidates as standard colors if the thinkers of the time had not placed such importance on the number seven.

  19. #9589
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Isaac Newton missed out on pink. But then, he's the only guy who can see indigo.
    Pink is not a spectral color. And indigo was probably just invented to provide a vowel for ROYGBIV.
    ETA: And the cartoon left out brown.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  20. #9590
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    I can't decide if it bugs me or amuses me that our dentist has seven children and puts pictures of them all on the office wall.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #9591
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    The one to sign "007" is every other owner of a custom license plate. I wonder how someone who apparently is smart enough to be rich, can be so lacking in imagination that they come no further than "my initials 007".
    You don't have to be smart to be rich. That's an urban myth, though a popular one. Just like you don't have to be dumb to be poor.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  22. #9592
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    A smooth talking trouble-prone pilot? Does he have a Wookiee travelling with him at any time?
    He does have a bumper sticker that says: "A wookiee is my co-pilot."
    Solfe

  23. #9593
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    A smooth talking trouble-prone pilot? Does he have a Wookiee travelling with him at any time?
    Speaking of woolies, Peter Mayhew died today. Not that that's amusing.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #9594
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Speaking of woolies, Peter Mayhew died today. Not that that's amusing.
    Wookies. Dang autocorrect.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #9595
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    If I am not mistaken, indigo dye was a valuable commodity in those days, and that could have been a motive for making its hue a seventh named color. Colors such as cyan and chartreuse could have been additional candidates as standard colors if the thinkers of the time had not placed such importance on the number seven.
    Charteuse hadn't been named yet, as the liqueur it's named after didn't exist yet. The first use of "cyan" in the English language only dates from 1879. So that's two other excellent reasons they didn't make it to the spectrum. You're right about indigo, though; it was extremely valuable as one of the only blue dyes, and its history is actually fascinating. It was one of the driving forces of colonialism, as well as the better-known spices. Though apparently, there's some belief that by "blue," Newton really meant "cyan" and by "indigo," he meant "blue."
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  26. #9596
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Charteuse hadn't been named yet, as the liqueur it's named after didn't exist yet. The first use of "cyan" in the English language only dates from 1879. So that's two other excellent reasons they didn't make it to the spectrum. You're right about indigo, though; it was extremely valuable as one of the only blue dyes, and its history is actually fascinating. It was one of the driving forces of colonialism, as well as the better-known spices. Though apparently, there's some belief that by "blue," Newton really meant "cyan" and by "indigo," he meant "blue."
    And it was Perkin who accidentally discovered mauviene while working on quinine for maleria and set in motion the analine dye industry, the fashion industry and those chocolate wrappers.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Henry_Perkin
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  27. #9597
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    Color blind myself...sigh

  28. #9598
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    I have just watched a YouTube video entitled Salvadore Dali's THOUSAND YEAR OLD EGGS Recipe Test - Les Diner de Gala. I quite like Emmy. She didn't much care for the eggs, however. At the end, you can click on a video of, I forget, "Apocolypse foods"? Anyhow, canned chicken (awful), canned bread (A New England thing, I guess) and canned cheese. Cougar Gold. It's sublime. I've got about half a can in the fridge I'm slowly working on.

    Meanwhile, I get the strangest ideas sometimes. If you made a Dalek out of antimatter, would it interminate you?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #9599
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    If you made a Dalek out of antimatter, would it interminate you?
    When a TARDIS cabin sinks into a dark hole, how large does its interior become?

  30. #9600
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    When a TARDIS cabin sinks into a dark hole, how large does its interior become?
    Wouldn't Doctor Who get stuck in a hypercube and see all of his previous incarnations? Wouldn't this be like typing "Google" into Google? (Don't try this.)

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