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Thread: Really trivial stuff that amuses you...

  1. #10081
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    My local PC World, apparently without any sense of irony, has effectively stopped selling PCs. Almost their entire computer display space is now dedicated to an endless array of ergonomically unsound laptops. Stuck away in a corner is a small table with five desktop towers on it, each of them labelled with a price, but no technical data.
    Thatís definitely debatable. To me, both laptops and desktops are a subset of PCs. Also, PC is sometimes used to refer to AT-compatible machines versus Macs, but even then the terms Max and PC are, as far as I know, still used to mean both desktops and laptops with those architectures. Where it gets tricky is with tablets.

    What I am amused by is that shops can, without irony, sell ďirons.Ē I donít think Iíve ever seen a real iron one, or even an ironic one for that matter.


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  2. #10082
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    That’s definitely debatable. To me, both laptops and desktops are a subset of PCs.
    Fair enough. But the company itself specifically distinguishes between "laptops" and "desktop PCs". There are no "laptop PCs" on display. (You can take a look at their UK website to see that they operate a standard naming convention in this regard.)
    That's a fairly common distinction, because a "laptop" doesn't need any qualification to let you know what is being spoken about, but a "desktop" kinda does. Hence my choice of the phrase "effectively stopped selling PCs" - there is no longer a display area in the shop with the label "PCs" above it.

    When I asked an assistant about it, he told me I should order on-line. Apparently "everyone" is buying undersized laptop/tablets these days.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2019-Oct-25 at 01:15 AM. Reason: bracketed

  3. #10083
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    Today, I'm amused that two younger friends are concerned about their bright, happy and healthy eleven-year-old son. Why are they concerned? Because he has never formed an opinion about what he wants to be when he grows up, and he seems both puzzled and impatient when adults ask him about this.
    Both his parents are able to reel off a long list of occupations they had once aspired to pursue, at various times during their childhood, and they seemed to think that not going through this process is somehow abnormal and perhaps worrying for their child's future.
    My sympathies are with the son - when I was a kid, all I wanted to be when I grew up was a grown-up, and I, too, was bemused when adults kept asking about my future employment plans. (Like I should know?) So I used to just make stuff up, from whatever I'd been reading about that day. I remember once claiming I wanted to be a castaway, and on another occasion I declared that I'd set my heart on becoming Pope (which went down as well in an atheist / Scottish presbyterian household as you might imagine).
    So good on their son, I say, for not being a deceitful wretch like I was.

    Grant Hutchison

  4. #10084
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    ... of ergonomically unsound laptops. ...
    My own main machine is a "proper" PC, tower; but did want to comment that laptops don't need to be ergonomically unsound, or at least, no worse than a PC.

    Any time I've used a laptop at home (e.g. before I bought my current PC; or currently when I bring my work laptop home) I have an external monitor, keyboard, and mouse ... just like a PC.

    A docking station isn't too expensive and makes this sort of thing a one-plug quick fix - making the laptop easy to move when needed.

    (
    I'm currently working at one of the main N.Z. banks. All of us are given laptops to use. The standard here is clean desk hot desk flexible workingTM. We arrive in the morning, get our laptop out of our locker, and go to any desk. The desks are all electrically powered to go to any height, so we can choose to sit or stand. We plug in our laptops, and the docking station each desk has then connects us to a full size keyboard (bring your own mouse) and two full size (24") monitors - on arms that allow any position.

    There's lots wrong with the hot desk concept (e.g. the reality is that people tend to sit at the same desk every day, so the banks' insistence on having the cleaners push all the monitors back to a neutral position and set the desk to a standard height every day, is just really annoying) but ergonomically, if we all had PC's it wouldn't be any better.

    (People with special needs can request an assigned desk and wrist supports or whatever they want.)
    )
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  5. #10085
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    In terms of "amuses you"; I was in the office one morning, the day some big-wigs were due to visit the building.

    A very well dressed person came around quite early, and I saw her looking down the rows of desks and pushing the buttons to make them all the same height.

    Hooray for thousand dollar desks that allow any height, so they can be used by well paid people to be the same height.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  6. #10086
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Today, I'm amused that two younger friends are concerned about their bright, happy and healthy eleven-year-old son. Why are they concerned? Because he has never formed an opinion about what he wants to be when he grows up, and he seems both puzzled and impatient when adults ask him about this.
    ...
    That sure seems like a bad idea. I know that I didn't settle into what would be my life's work until I was almost 30, and even then I was prepared to change if circumstances permitted. If any younger person asks me for advice, I urge them to keep their options open while learning as much as they can about a variety of things.

  7. #10087
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    My own main machine is a "proper" PC, tower; but did want to comment that laptops don't need to be ergonomically unsound, or at least, no worse than a PC.
    I was referring to a couple of problems with the current fashion for tiny laptops.
    One is that the keyboards are necessarily tiny, too - so the user's hands (even those of us who are ten-finger typists) are in constant side-to-side motion, which subverts the usefulness of wrist supports.
    The second is that the screen necessarily sits just above the keyboard - either your neck is craned downwards, or your forearms are tilted upwards with wrists flexed. Anyone who has (or wishes to avoid) chronic joint pain will find either of these positions unsustainable in the long term.

    Grant Hutchison

  8. #10088
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    That sure seems like a bad idea. I know that I didn't settle into what would be my life's work until I was almost 30, and even then I was prepared to change if circumstances permitted. If any younger person asks me for advice, I urge them to keep their options open while learning as much as they can about a variety of things.
    New Scientist have recently started a section in which they interview scientists with a set of standard questions. One of them is, "What job did you want to do when you grew up?" So far, no-one has replied, "What? Are you mad? Why would I consider such a thing?" Instead, they all produce a semi-comic, semi-serious litany of future job plans they formed in childhood. I'm forced to conclude that people really do that when they're kids.

    On the other hand, they also ask people what message they would send back to their childhood selves. And most people seem to go down the tedious route of: It'll get better / Ignore the bullies / It's all worth it in the end. So I'm filled with admiration for the person whose message was, "Don't put Smurfy in that box."

    Grant Hutchison

  9. #10089
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    At earlier ages I wanted to be (in order) a dog, a cowboy, a fireman, a big league ballplayer* ... but by age 11, I was undecided.

    *When your Little League manager makes you a late-inning defensive replacement, there's a message about your hitting that you shouldn't ignore.

  10. #10090
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    Like most here I had no idea what my future career would be at 11 - in fact I still had no real idea at 17. I just knew that I had no mechanical or 'handyman' aptitude so an office job was all I was probably good for.

  11. #10091
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I was referring to a couple of problems with the current fashion for tiny laptops.
    One is that the keyboards are necessarily tiny, too - so the user's hands (even those of us who are ten-finger typists) are in constant side-to-side motion, which subverts the usefulness of wrist supports.
    The second is that the screen necessarily sits just above the keyboard - either your neck is craned downwards, or your forearms are tilted upwards with wrists flexed. Anyone who has (or wishes to avoid) chronic joint pain will find either of these positions unsustainable in the long term.

    Grant Hutchison
    Yes, that was obvious, and why I mentioned plugging in a keyboard and monitor ... just like a "real" PC would have.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  12. #10092
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    Yes, that was obvious, and why I mentioned plugging in a keyboard and monitor ... just like a "real" PC would have.
    Indeed. So once you've taken the necessary measures to render your laptop ergonomic, it's no longer functioning as a laptop - just processor and storage plugged into a larger machine.
    I don't think we disagree.

    Grant Hutchison

  13. #10093
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Indeed. So once you've taken the necessary measures to render your laptop ergonomic, it's no longer functioning as a laptop - just processor and storage plugged into a larger machine.
    I don't think we disagree.

    Grant Hutchison
    I have found various dictation software has improved to the point that it is useful in a laptop or even tablets. Actually it’s creepy how good it can be without training! That improves ergonomics for many writing tasks.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  14. #10094
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    I wanted to be a mountain climber, a marine biologist, a Rockette, a detective, an Olympic swimmer, a cryptid hunter, an astronomer, a secret agent... I settled on “archaeologist” when I was 11 and that has pretty much been my path since.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroesí wings we fly!

  15. #10095
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    I just want to be a simple starship captain.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  16. #10096
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    Simon's response just now was a frustrated, "I keep on changing, because they're all so good!" Followed by a more cheerful, "But I'm going for a cook."
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  17. #10097
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    I wanted to be a mountain climber, a marine biologist, a Rockette, a detective, an Olympic swimmer, a cryptid hunter, an astronomer, a secret agent... I settled on “archaeologist” when I was 11 and that has pretty much been my path since.
    And it seems to have worked out for you, too.

    In medicine, there was a whole bunch of people like me, who just kind of wandered into it (I'd go so far as to say I was tricked into it, but that was unusual), and another bunch who reported various versions of "I've wanted to do it all my life / since I was [some age]". The latter group had by far the worst time of it, in my experience - some struggling to pass the necessary exams, some finding that reality didn't match the expectation they'd formed at a young age, and some simply becoming exhausted trying to live up to a sort of "dream standard" they'd naively set themselves in early life. The "it's a job" crowd enjoyed much greater equanimity about how things turned out in practice, and could more easily walk away without taking an emotional hit if things turned out not to suit them.

    Grant Hutchison

  18. #10098
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    I wanted to be a scientist! But around the time I started college my practical side came out as I figured I could get a good job with just a ** in engineering. Hard science, not so much. And by the time I graduated, sure enough I had a job waiting for me! One that gave me free green clothing....

    ETA, things that bug me: The forum nanny has asterisked out the usual abbreviation for "Bachelor of Science". "BSc" is not all that common in the USA.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #10099
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    I was amused when I saw a school zone speed limit sign flashing at 10:30 Sunday night. It had no effect on how fast I was driving because at that particular location the speed limit is the same, 25 mph, whether the sign is flashing or not.

  20. #10100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    I was amused when I saw a school zone speed limit sign flashing at 10:30 Sunday night. It had no effect on how fast I was driving because at that particular location the speed limit is the same, 25 mph, whether the sign is flashing or not.
    I see that all the time around here, even when the speed limits are different during school hours or not. Some of them are manually controlled by the school (and they forget to turn them off), some are more automated, but are otherwise broken. As best as I can tell, the cops don't ticket you for ignoring a sign that is wrong; they are considered more like reminders to the drivers.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  21. #10101
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I see that all the time around here, even when the speed limits are different during school hours or not. Some of them are manually controlled by the school (and they forget to turn them off), some are more automated, but are otherwise broken. As best as I can tell, the cops don't ticket you for ignoring a sign that is wrong; they are considered more like reminders to the drivers.
    Depends on the cops, I think. Some towns I travel through are fairly lax, some are very strict about any posted speed limits, no matter the circumstance.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  22. #10102
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    I frankly wish more people got ticketed on our street; the speed limit is 25, and people go zipping along at much higher speeds.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  23. #10103
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    Not sure if this amuses, or just confuses, me.

    The other day, I spotted a car with a bumper sticker that read something like, ďNot *everybody* was Kung Fu fighting.Ē

    Given the age of the car (new) and the age of the referenced song (old), I canít imagine why it was there. I got a small chuckle, but Iím old, too.




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  24. #10104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Not sure if this amuses, or just confuses, me.

    The other day, I spotted a car with a bumper sticker that read something like, “Not *everybody* was Kung Fu fighting.”

    Given the age of the car (new) and the age of the referenced song (old), I can’t imagine why it was there. I got a small chuckle, but I’m old, too.




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    Old people buy cars, too. Also, references can be revived, as "Kung Fu Fighting" was IIRC the theme song for a few new movies.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  25. #10105
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    It's mentioned in Wayne's World, for starters.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  26. #10106
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    I found the perfect conversation ender.


    Kitty: Did you know that... <insert subject here>
    Me: Yes. Of course, I did.
    Kitty: How could you possibly know that?
    Me: I wrote the Wikipedia page.
    Kitty: <silent beat> You are so full of it!
    Solfe

  27. #10107
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    Yesterday, as I was driving on freeways in and around Washington, I saw electric signs that were saying, "World Series event. Avoid traffic. Take Metro." The World series ended in Houston Wednesday night, with the last game in Washington last Sunday.

  28. #10108
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hornblower View Post
    Yesterday, as I was driving on freeways in and around Washington, I saw electric signs that were saying, "World Series event. Avoid traffic. Take Metro." The World series ended in Houston Wednesday night, with the last game in Washington last Sunday.
    Was there some sort of celebration of the championship?

    ETA: Yes, there was.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #10109
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    I just get really annoyed with having to set all the dang clocks twice a year. Especially since I'm slightly OCD about it and want them very close to the exact time as determined by my phone. I was even dreaming about it this morning when we were awakened by the one clock I set last night and on which I had accidentally turned on the alarm.

    ETA: That was supposed to be in "bugs you", of course. Now I'm bugged about that.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  30. #10110
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    I may have told this before but, why not?

    I worked in an office with wall clocks mounted high in several conference rooms. Twice each year the maintenance guy had to climb a ladder to reset each clock. That was deemed a potential falling hazard so the company bought clocks that were reset automatically by a signal from Colorado Springs.

    But the metal framing of the building blocked the signal so twice each year the maintenance guy had to climb a ladder to remove each clock and set them by windows. Then he had to replace them after they automatically reset.
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
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    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They donít alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
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