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Thread: Indian Mars Mission

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    The first name of anything seems to be always bland. Look at the title of the first Star Trek movie.
    Hopefully it doesn't end up as bad as that.

  2. #32
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    I wish them all the luck. There are a lot of questions that can be answered with another set of "eyes" on Mars.
    My travel blog Mostly about riding a motorcycle across the US and Europe. Also has cool things that happen in between.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    The name's a bit bland (Mars Orbiting Mission), but Godspeed all the same.
    At least it doesn't seem to be one of those stupid acronyms.
    Information about American English usage here. Floating point issues? Please read this before posting.

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  4. #34
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    MOM has now completed its first orbital boost successfully! Only another 5 to go before it sets off on the road to the Red Planet!

  5. #35
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    Seems like we already have trouble.
    Ah well, you get what you paid for.

  6. #36
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    Looks like its fine, still in normal health.

    ISRO Said
    Supplementary Orbit Raising Manoeuvre Planned for Mars Orbiter Spacecraft

    In the fourth orbit-raising operation conducted this morning (Nov 11, 2013), the apogee (farthest point to Earth) of Mars Orbiter Spacecraft was raised from 71,623 km to 78,276 km by imparting an incremental velocity of 35 metres/second (as against 130 metres/second originally planned to raise apogee to about 100,000 [1 lakh] km). The spacecraft is in normal health. A supplementary orbit-raising operation is planned tomorrow (November 12, 2013) at 0500 hrs IST to raise the apogee to nearly 1 lakh km.
    more...

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by NEOWatcher View Post
    The first name of anything seems to be always bland. Look at the title of the first Star Trek movie.
    Wait, which first one? The original or the Reboot?
    What does God need with a starship?

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sardonicone View Post
    Wait, which first one? The original or the Reboot?
    Take your pick.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by ravens_cry View Post
    Makes sense to fire during the part of orbit when it has the most effect. *nods*
    Sorry, I also don't understand. I thought orbital mechanics had it that if the spacecraft's altitude at perigee doesn't change then neither does its velocity at perigee.

    Am I wrong?

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
    Sorry, I also don't understand. I thought orbital mechanics had it that if the spacecraft's altitude at perigee doesn't change then neither does its velocity at perigee.

    Am I wrong?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberth_effect

    The energy transferred into the propellant by thrusting, speeds up the craft more at perigee then at apogee. Thus, a rise in overall orbital height.

    To use a very shaky metaphor, it's like a submarine blowing its ballast tanks, it works better the more weight of water you get rid of.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  11. #41
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    Correct me if I am wrong, but here's one way to think about it. Say you are punching someone. If you are punching someone and you are both standing still, your punch will have it's normal damage. But if you run at someone AND punch them with the same punch, they will have additional energy from you running at them. At least, that's my non-mathematical understanding.

  12. #42
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  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bolasanibk View Post
    And on my b-day too!

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ravens_cry View Post
    Correct me if I am wrong, but here's one way to think about it. Say you are punching someone. If you are punching someone and you are both standing still, your punch will have it's normal damage. But if you run at someone AND punch them with the same punch, they will have additional energy from you running at them. At least, that's my non-mathematical understanding.
    Yes, that works better than the submarine idea. As you dive into the gravity well (the "run"), both the spacecraft and the fuel it carries gain energy; when you expel that propellant at perigee (the "punch"), you are also pushing out the extra momentum it gained.
    Last edited by Noclevername; 2013-Dec-02 at 08:04 AM. Reason: added run & punch
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  15. #45
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    Well, I am glad my analogy worked then. Perigee is when the craft is moving fastest after all.

  16. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
    Sorry, I also don't understand. I thought orbital mechanics had it that if the spacecraft's altitude at perigee doesn't change then neither does its velocity at perigee.

    Am I wrong?
    You're wrong. An object in a circular orbit is going to be going slower at its altitude than an object that has that same altitude as the periapsis of an elliptical orbit. If the speeds were the same, then the latter object would lack the kinetic energy to send it to its more distant apoapsis.
    Everything I need to know I learned through Googling.

  17. #47
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    Orbital insertion 22 September 2014, Indiatoday reports that after Mars India plans a Moon mission. I wonder if this will be a lander or maybe a rover?

  18. #48
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    114 days and still alive. Still will have to wait till September if India can pull the rabbit out of the hat and send it around Mars. As this was billed by the Indian scientist as a technology proving flight they are bang on target. Go India go.

    http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/sci...cle5679018.ece

    The Mars Orbiter spacecraft completes 100 days in space on Wednesday (Feb. 12), or roughly a third of its journey towards the Red Planet.

    The country's first interplanetary probe, launched on November 5, 2013, is in good health during its curved travel of 190 million km so far towards Mars; it has to traverse a total of 680 million km over the next 210 days, Indian Space Research Organisation said on Tuesday.

  19. #49
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    Woohoo! Go MOM, go! Make that orbit!

  20. #50
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    Good to know that MOM is still on course for Mars in September this year!

  21. #51
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    And joined by the US probe within days of each other. What will be interesting, will be in October when they will have a front seat view of a comet.

  22. #52
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    200 days left before MOM reaches Mars

    http://www.ndtv.com/article/india/in...ination-492877

    India's ambitious maiden inter-planetary voyage Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), launched in November last year, has covered over 21 million km and as of today is exactly 200 days away from reaching the red planet's orbit on September 24.

  23. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Launch window View Post
    Orbital insertion 22 September 2014, Indiatoday reports that after Mars India plans a Moon mission. I wonder if this will be a lander or maybe a rover?
    A bit of everything

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/i...w/24946667.cms

    Indian Space Research Organization (Isro) on Wednesday said it was awaiting the government's approval for more funds to develop a lander and a rover for its second Moon mission 'Chandrayaan-2'.

  24. #54
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    It will be nail biting period in October if MOM is successfully in orbiting Mars. That will also be true for the American satellites orbiting Mars. The reason comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) will be passing only 84,000 miles from Mars. To cap it all the comet now has a dust cloud measuring 12,000 miles across and two tails

    http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Hu..._Jets_999.html

    NASA released Thursday an image of a comet that, on Oct. 19, will pass within 84,000 miles of Mars -- less than half the distance between Earth and our moon.

    The image on the left, captured March 11 by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows comet C/2013 A1, also called Siding Spring, at a distance of 353 million miles from Earth. Hubble can't see Siding Spring's icy nucleus because of its diminutive size. The nucleus is surrounded by a glowing dust cloud, or COMA, that measures roughly 12,000 miles across.
    MOM will have an orbit of - planned periapsis of 365 km (227 mi) and apoapsis of 80,000 km (50,000 mi)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_Or...rbit_insertion

    The current plan is for insertion into Mars orbit on 24 September 2014,[7] approximately 2 days after the arrival of NASA's MAVEN orbiter.[65] MOM will be set on a highly elliptical orbit around Mars, with a period of 76.7 hours and a planned periapsis of 365 km (227 mi) and apoapsis of 80,000 km (50,000 mi)

  25. #55
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    NASA has a link to MOM - peanuts

    http://www.spacenews.com/article/opi...a-us-relations

    Indian scientists preparing to launch their Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) in November 2013 received an usual message — “lucky peanuts” from scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  26. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    NASA has a link to MOM - peanuts

    http://www.spacenews.com/article/opi...a-us-relations
    Indian scientists preparing to launch their Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) in November 2013 received an usual message — “lucky peanuts” from scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
    I love it.
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  27. #57
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    MOM today has completed 50% of it's journey to Mars

    http://www.business-standard.com/art...0800966_1.html

    The Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), India's first interplanetary exploration programme, is midway to the Red Planet. On Wednesday MOM will cross the mid-point of its path to Mars.

  28. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    Given the budgetary constraints under which spacefaring nations like the United States and India operate, cooperation is a valuable means to furthering our understanding of Earth’s ecosystem. Both NASA and ISRO have made commitments to continue their cooperative engagement in space research.
    There was a question earlier in this thread about if ISRO would share their data. I'm not sure they could keep us from downloading it if we want (we did that when the Russians sent a mission to the back side of the moon). This statement and cooperation described in the link give me hopes that they will share.

    At LPSC this year there were two talks about the Chinese lunar rover. They were extremely preliminary results, but it was nice to see their participation as well.
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  29. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscountry View Post
    There was a question earlier in this thread about if ISRO would share their data. I'm not sure they could keep us from downloading it if we want (we did that when the Russians sent a mission to the back side of the moon). This statement and cooperation described in the link give me hopes that they will share.

    At LPSC this year there were two talks about the Chinese lunar rover. They were extremely preliminary results, but it was nice to see their participation as well.
    Cooperation is quite extensive. As the article with the peanuts shows. eg
    OceanSat-2 is an Indian remote sensing satellite launched in 2009. Under the cooperative agreement, OceanSat-2 was extensively utilized during Hurricane Sandy to determine ocean surface winds using its radio scatterometer. The image of Hurricane Sandy obtained by the scatterometer on Oct. 29, 2012, was transmitted to NASA and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration showing the storm heading toward the U.S. East Coast.
    That is true in a lot more areas.

  30. #60
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    I'm bumping this thread since selvaarchi seems to want to throw MOM items in other threads:

    From the Maven Thread:
    Quote Originally Posted by selvaarchi View Post
    A new task added to Maven's list and also MOM.
    Not exactly new. MOM"s proximity to the comet was known for over a year.
    In fact, they aren't sure if they need to maneuver it (like some others will) to avoid damage.
    But; they do believe they will have the best position for viewing.
    Reference.

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