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Thread: ExoMars mission

  1. #61
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    Linkage at BBC: Schiaparelli Mars probe's parachute 'jettisoned too early'

    So, likely a new small crater to look for. Have to give it a different name as there's already a Schiaparelli on Mars.

  2. #62
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    Shrapnelli crater?

  3. #63
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    Schiaparelli (ESA). Mars still seems to be a daunting target, NASA has failed on a few missions. To be fair this was a "test" of a new landing procedure so a lot may be gained from the data received.

  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Shrapnelli crater?


    CJSF
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  5. #65
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    /Josiah Bartlet/

    "Talk to us."

    /Josiah Bartlet/

    /

  6. #66
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    News from sky-imaging expert Mark Lemmon puts a damper on hopes that pictures, Opportunity was trying to take, of the landing will give some clues to what happened.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...ortunitys.html

    Today, the Opportunity rover attempted a difficult, never-before-possible feat: to shoot a photo of an arriving Mars lander from the Martian surface. Unfortunately, that attempt seems not to have succeeded. Opportunity has now returned the images from the observation attempt, but science team member and sky-imaging expert Mark Lemmon states "I see nothing but cosmic rays hits in the Pancam images." Cosmic ray hits are bright spots or streaks caused by energetic particles from space striking the camera detector. They're common features in spacecraft images and can usually be discerned by their crisp edges and streaked shape. The Opportunity image below is one of the Schiaparelli imaging attempts that contains a particularly bright cosmic ray hit.

  7. #67
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    It is not all doom and gloom with the ExoMars mission. Even with the "failure" of Schiaparelli to land successfully, two other objectives were achieved. Even the "failure" is not a total failure as it was a test and data received about it will help make the next attempt more likely to succeed.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest...s-journey.html

    First, the good news. The main part of the mission, the Trace Gas Orbiter, has been inserted into the correct orbit. It will look at the gases constituting less than 1% of the atmosphere, focusing especially on methane. ESA’s Mars Express has detected methane from orbit already, and Curiosity has seen it come and go from the surface. Its transient nature has puzzled planetary scientists. It shouldn’t persist in the atmosphere, implying that somehow it is being replenished by geological or biological processes undefined; nor should it vanish so quickly after it appears.

    TGO’s safe arrival promises that the main science mission can proceed, and it will begin an aerobraking phase to change the shape of its orbit to a circular, science one in January. Once fully settled in, it will also become a relay point for NASA landers, fulfilling two of the three main objectives of ExoMars 2016.

    The third objective was to demonstrate that Europe can land on Mars. On that front, the news is less positive. Both the data from Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope in Pune, India, and the data from Mars Express indicate a loss of signal at the same stage of the descent of the lander.

    “That’s the bad news,” says Paolo Ferri, head of mission operations at ESA, “The fact that Pune and Mars Express lose the signal at the same time before the predicted time of touchdown.

    “We will hear if there is some information from MRO [Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter] –but frankly I consider it unlikely that we get data from MRO. If we lost the signal before the landing, at least with the communications, why should MRO be able to communicate automatically?”

    With no information coming from the lander, the key question is whether the lander itself is lost, or whether it’s just not able to communicate. There is more information about Schiaparelli’s fate on the way, with raw data expected around midnight Darmstadt time.

  8. #68
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    They have downloaded the data and initial analysis of it suggests the module had successfully completed most steps of its 6-minute descent through the martian atmosphere. This included the deceleration through the atmosphere, and the parachute and heat shield deployment, for example.

    http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Sp...oding_underway

    Essential data from the ExoMars Schiaparelli lander sent to its mothership Trace Gas Orbiter during the module’s descent to the Red Planet’s surface yesterday has been downlinked to Earth and is currently being analysed by experts.

    Early indications from both the radio signals captured by the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), an experimental telescope array located near Pune, India, and from orbit by ESA’s Mars Express, suggested the module had successfully completed most steps of its 6-minute descent through the martian atmosphere. This included the deceleration through the atmosphere, and the parachute and heat shield deployment, for example.

    But the signals recorded by both Pune and Mars Express stopped shortly before the module was expected to touchdown on the surface. Discrepancies between the two data sets are being analysed by experts at ESA’s space operations centre in Darmstadt, Germany.

  9. #69
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    Schiaparelli might have crashed at high speed into Mars.

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/...s-fate-on-mars

    It was supposed to be the first European spacecraft to carry out science on Mars, but it now looks likely that the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Schiaparelli lander met its end in a destructive high-speed collision at the planet’s surface.

    Although ESA has not yet conceded that its lander crashed – and it may be weeks before its fate is known for certain – scientists said that this appeared the most likely scenario.

    Jorge Vago, the ExoMars project scientist, said: “That [a crash] sounds plausible. Based on what we know [a soft landing] is unlikely.”

  10. #70
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    Schiaparelli's wreckage found!

    http://www.russianspaceweb.com/exoma...nding.html#mro

    ESA promised to continue attempts to communicate with the lander in the coming days using available orbiters and to make an effort to locate the lander or its remnants on the surface of Mars.

    Sure enough, by October 21, NASA's sharp-eyed Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, MRO, imaged the wreckage of Schiaparelli on the surface of Mars exactly at the center of a planned landing ellipse. In the meantime, ESA engineers suspected that the guidance and navigation, GNS, software had been a culprit in the failure, commanding the premature cutoff of the propulsion system, which led to a free fall from an altitiude between four and two kilometers, possibly, with the module's propellant tanks still nearly full.

    Surprisingly, radar altimeter data, accelerometers and other sensors were delivering consistent and expected data, as far as ESA experts could reconstruct the events from the limited set of data captured by the TGO orbiter.

  11. #71
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    At least the guidance was correct, just not the commands to the engines.

  12. #72
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    It was such a nice looking lander too: http://www.universetoday.com/wp-cont...A2-700x355.jpg

    The lower crushable section looked like the saucer bottom of the USS Enterprise.
    https://www.reddit.com/r/educational..._will_land_on/

    It was supposed to take 40 gees--but still had lots of propellant:
    http://www.space.com/34474-exomars-l...een-video.html

    Drat!

    This was similar to Viking, in that you had an orbiter/lander pair--launched by a Titan III class Proton.

  13. #73
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    What a shame, what a shame...

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    It was such a nice looking lander too: http://www.universetoday.com/wp-cont...A2-700x355.jpg

    The lower crushable section looked like the saucer bottom of the USS Enterprise.
    https://www.reddit.com/r/educational..._will_land_on/

    It was supposed to take 40 gees--but still had lots of propellant:
    http://www.space.com/34474-exomars-l...een-video.html

    Drat!

    This was similar to Viking, in that you had an orbiter/lander pair--launched by a Titan III class Proton.
    Yes and no. As a demonstrator, the lander would only have lasted a few days.

    CJSF

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    Vaporized with extreme prejudice and shot into outer space.

    I'll be haunting you."

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  15. #75
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    Emily Lakdawalla on Schiaparelli crash site imaged by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and where the various parts of the lander would have landed.

    http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily...pdate-ctx.html

    Just a day after the arrival of ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter and its lander Schiaparelli, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has taken a photo of the landing site with its Context Camera, and things do not look good. ESA posted the image and an analysis on their website today.

    Context Camera takes large images of Mars at what is now considered a medium resolution of 6 meters per pixel (back in the days of Viking and Mars Global Surveyor, this was the highest possible resolution). The "fuzzy dark patch" looks a great deal like another impact site seen by Context Camera, where the Mars Science Laboratory descent stage crashed following the successful landing of the Curiosity rover. The descent stage likely had fuel remaining in it when it crashed, and is believed to have exploded on impact. So, too, would Schiaparelli, if its thrusters shut down prematurely.

    Where is Schiaparelli's heat shield? ESA's update says the heat shield has not yet been revealed, but sharp-eyed viewers on both unmannedspaceflight.com and NASAspaceflight.com have pointed out a spot on the "after" image that is a distinct possibility, lying in the right direction and at an appropriate distance from the lander.

    Time will tell if that guess is correct. Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter will follow up the Context Camera image with HiRISE imaging within the next few days, when imaging geometry is right. The relative positions of landing site and parachute will make it possible to target them both within the same HiRISE image, possibly both within the central color swath if the targeting is perfect. But to catch the likely location of the heat shield within one HiRISE image, they'd have to target the color swath away from the lander.

    While I was looking at the image of the landing ellipse, I realized that I recognized the features. I knew that the Schiaparelli landing ellipse was very close to Opportunity, of course, but it was still a bit surprising to realize that the entire Opportunity mission has been contained within that one map. I measured, and the Schiaparelli impact site is 54 kilometers away from where Opportunity now sits on the edge of Endeavour crater.

  16. #76
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    Scientist investigating the crash landing of Schiaparelli, are now looking at the altimeter software as the cause of the crash.

    http://www.russianspaceweb.com/exoma...ding.html#1024

    By October 24, engineers narrowed down a possible culprit to an error in the software of the Schiaparelli's radar altimeter, which misled the main computer into thinking that the spacecraft had already reached the landing altitude.

  17. #77
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    This sounds eerily similar to NASA's KM to mile debacle.

  18. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    This sounds eerily similar to NASA's KM to mile debacle.
    Or perhaps something like the Ariane 5 counter rollover.

    http://www.math.umn.edu/~arnold/disasters/ariane.html?



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  19. #79
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    Although Schiaparelli failed to land successfully on Mars, the data it sent back will help the ExoMars team to refine the landing for the 2020 mission. Remember Schiaparelli was only a demo to demonstrate the landing techniques and incooperate the learning into the 2020 mission.

    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2016...rs-2020-rover/

    While the final result was not as intended, data from the European Space Agency’s Schiaparelli lander, which failed to make a successful soft landing on the surface of Mars last week, will live on in the form of the ExoMars 2020 rover, which will use data from Schiaparelli to upgrade and enhance its landing technology for a successful arrival at Mars in four years’ time.

  20. #80
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    NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has given a more detailed map of the Schiaparelli crash location.

    http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/new...steries-remain

    NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has provided a higher resolution image of the site where the European Space Agency's (ESA's) Schiaparelli lander impacted the Martian surface, but some of the features in the image remain unexplained. Schiaparelli is part of ESA's ExoMars program and was designed to demonstrate technologies needed for the next phase of the program -- a Russian lander and ESA rover to be launched in 2020. Understanding exactly what happened is crucial for the 2020 mission.

    Schiaparelli was launched together with ESA's Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) in March. The two made the trip to Mars together, separating on October 16, three days before arrival at Mars. TGO successfully entered orbit, but contact was lost with Schiaparelli during its descent.

    It was located two days later using the low resolution CTX camera on MRO. The image indicated that the lander crashed into the surface at a high velocity after separating from its parachute and heat shield. ESA has been awaiting a second pass over the site by MRO to obtain an image with its high resolution camera, HiRISE.

    That image was taken on October 25 and released to the public today. It shows three impact areas, highlighted in the image below, within 1.5 kilometers of each other.

  21. #81
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    More details of why the landing failed but we are no closer to answering what went wrong.

    http://spaceflight101.com/faulty-sof...relli-landing/

    A navigation software miscommunication appears to have played a central role in last week’s Schiaparelli crash landing on the surface of Mars, initial analysis of data recorded during the lander’s descent reveals.

    Schiaparelli – part of the European Space Agency’s ExoMars 2016 mission – was attempting to demonstrate Mars entry & landing technology for the ExoMars 2020 mission that aims to deliver a much larger payload to the surface of the planet comprised of a European rover and Russian-built surface platform.

    The 600-Kilogram lander was dispatched on its final descent toward Mars by the main element of the mission, the Trace Gas Orbiter which – in parallel to Schiaparelli’s landing – fired its main engine to be captured in Mars orbit for a five-year mission exploring the planet’s atmosphere. Schiaparelli hit the atmosphere at 14:42 UTC last Wednesday and was set for a six-minute descent to the surface, but signals from the lander stopped around a minute prior to the expected landing.

  22. #82
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    Thanks for the updates, selvaarchi. Very interesting stuff in that last link.


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  23. #83
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    Smile

    Days spent at sea are not deducted from one's alloted span...
    (Phoenician proverb)

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    Quote Originally Posted by molesworth View Post

  25. #85
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    First the Falcon now this... The Cubs are using up all the good luck in the universe to break the curse. Someone has to stop them.

  26. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by publiusr View Post
    First the Falcon now this... The Cubs are using up all the good luck in the universe to break the curse. Someone has to stop them.
    Apollo fans wished on a monkey's paw that the 60s would come back. They got capsule spacecraft to be in vogue but they also brought back more frequent failures, blatant displays of racism, and US-Russia tension.

    In short, never wish on a monkey's paw.

  27. #87
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    Bad Code May Have Crashed Schiaparelli Mars Lander

    Thrusters, designed to decelerate the craft for 30 seconds until it was metres off the ground, engaged for only around 3 seconds before they were commanded to switch off, because the lander's computer thought it was on the ground. The lander even switched on its suite of instruments, ready to record Mars's weather and electrical field, although they did not collect data...

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    They are pointing to an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) as the likely cause of the crash.

    http://www.spacepolicyonline.com/new...parelli-lander

    The European Space Agency (ESA) said today that erroneous data from an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) doomed its Schiaparelli Mars lander last month. The bad data convinced onboard systems that the spacecraft had already landed when it actually was still 3.7 kilometers (km) above the surface. The spacecraft made a free fall the rest of way, hitting the surface at a high velocity. Schiaparelli is part of ESA's ExoMars program and traveled to Mars with the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) spacecraft, which successfully entered orbit.

  30. #90
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    It seems like an odd and easily preventable failure mode. If the IMU registered a stop, but the altimeter and other systems did not, it should have been overridden. In other words, having that as your only valid indicator of a landing seems to be really poor design.

    CJSF
    "Flipping this one final switch I'm effectively ensuring that I will be
    Overcoming all resistance long after my remains have been
    Vaporized with extreme prejudice and shot into outer space.

    I'll be haunting you."

    -They Might Be Giants, "I'll Be Haunting You"


    lonelybirder.org

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