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Thread: What are you watching?

  1. #3661
    The Martian.
    From the wilderness into the cosmos.
    You can not be afraid of the wind, Enterprise: Broken Bow.
    https://davidsuniverse.wordpress.com/

  2. #3662
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    The Martian.
    Bad luck. Could be worse. Could be Gravity.

    Grant Hutchison

  3. #3663
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    I considered starting Twin Peaks this morning, but Irene woke up around about the time Laura's parents learned she was dead, so maybe Trollhunters would be better?
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  4. #3664
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    Away on Netflix, starring Hillary Swank. It's a 'first human mission to Mars' series. Although the first two episodes featured some rather ridiculous crew interactions, it's held my interest so far.

  5. #3665
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Away on Netflix, starring Hillary Swank. It's a 'first human mission to Mars' series. Although the first two episodes featured some rather ridiculous crew interactions, it's held my interest so far.

    Spoiler: (Highlight this box to see the hidden message.)

    I was just logging in to mention this show too - the crew interactions and the (lack of) safety procedure allowed for the EVA were almost enough to yank me totally out of it. I forgave the star (and Milky Way!) being visible from a brightly lit moon and/or Earth in the sky. But the obvious lack of NASA's usual caution/safety first and rigid EVA protocols and that of time delays in the video and phone conversations has been harder for me to swallow (I understand the need to have dialog, and I was OK with the apparent lack of delay from the Moon and the first few days out to Mars, but after that it really should have been worked into the plot.


    Having said that, I am enjoying the show on its merits and being gladly entertained.

    CJSF
    "The sun is a quagmire
    It's not made of fire
    Forget what you've been told in the past
    Electrons are free
    (Plasma!) Fourth state of matter
    Not gas, not liquid, not solid"

    -They Might Be Giants, "Why Does The Sun Really Shine?"


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  6. #3666
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    Spoiler: (Highlight this box to see the hidden message.)

    I was just logging in to mention this show too - the crew interactions and the (lack of) safety procedure allowed for the EVA were almost enough to yank me totally out of it. I forgave the star (and Milky Way!) being visible from a brightly lit moon and/or Earth in the sky. But the obvious lack of NASA's usual caution/safety first and rigid EVA protocols and that of time delays in the video and phone conversations has been harder for me to swallow (I understand the need to have dialog, and I was OK with the apparent lack of delay from the Moon and the first few days out to Mars, but after that it really should have been worked into the plot.


    Having said that, I am enjoying the show on its merits and being gladly entertained.

    CJSF
    Yes, I agree with all that. There's certainly plenty to pick on with regards to unrealistic situations and such. I'm still able to suspend my disbelief but I'm hoping, for instance, that the show runners will eventually recognize that the spacecraft is at least a few light seconds away from Earth (and increasing) and will incorporate that into their communication scenes.

  7. #3667
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    Started watching "Zoo" on Netflix. Apparently three seasons of it exist; based on a book. Animals are starting to "fight back" against humans. Won't say more (spoilers).

    Much of the "science" is just plain daft and a lot of the narrative seems a bit off (disjointed?), but actually enjoying it. It's interesting enough, but sort of light too.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  8. #3668
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    Turns out at least season one of The Carol Burnett Show is on Amazon Prime!
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  9. #3669
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    Regarding Away: Would there be an inherent and drastic advantage to spinning just a portion of the spacecraft for simulating gravity vs just spinning the whole ship on its axis? It would seem to be fairly substantial mass penalty to have they system they are using vs. a small amout of fuel to use RCS-type thrusters to initiate and halt a spin.

    CJSF
    P.S.
    I told the board to quote the last Away exchange to avoid confusion, but it seems determined not to include it.
    "The sun is a quagmire
    It's not made of fire
    Forget what you've been told in the past
    Electrons are free
    (Plasma!) Fourth state of matter
    Not gas, not liquid, not solid"

    -They Might Be Giants, "Why Does The Sun Really Shine?"


    lonelybirder.org

  10. #3670
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    Regarding Away: Would there be an inherent and drastic advantage to spinning just a portion of the spacecraft for simulating gravity vs just spinning the whole ship on its axis? It would seem to be fairly substantial mass penalty to have they system they are using vs. a small amout of fuel to use RCS-type thrusters to initiate and halt a spin.

    CJSF
    P.S.
    I told the board to quote the last Away exchange to avoid confusion, but it seems determined not to include it.
    Would you get enough artificial gravity by spinning the whole ship? As it is, the crew's quarters are at the ends of arms/passageways that were extended well away from the axis of the ship after launch.

  11. #3671
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Would you get enough artificial gravity by spinning the whole ship? As it is, the crew's quarters are at the ends of arms/passageways that were extended well away from the axis of the ship after launch.
    Why would it be any different? I'd assume the extensions would be there, just no need for the counter rotation of the center.

    CJSF
    "The sun is a quagmire
    It's not made of fire
    Forget what you've been told in the past
    Electrons are free
    (Plasma!) Fourth state of matter
    Not gas, not liquid, not solid"

    -They Might Be Giants, "Why Does The Sun Really Shine?"


    lonelybirder.org

  12. #3672
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    Regarding Away: Would there be an inherent and drastic advantage to spinning just a portion of the spacecraft for simulating gravity vs just spinning the whole ship on its axis? It would seem to be fairly substantial mass penalty to have they system they are using vs. a small amout of fuel to use RCS-type thrusters to initiate and halt a spin.
    The only possible advantage I can think of is that the crew could also live in the central part. I think it would be very disorienting to have the middle spinning. But if the crew is going to remain on the extended portions, then no, I don't see any advantage. I'm not sure if this is the case here (I don't know the show), but another potential advantage would be if you are for example orbiting the sun, and want to keep solar panels pointed in the same direction.
    As above, so below

  13. #3673
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    Why would it be any different? I'd assume the extensions would be there, just no need for the counter rotation of the center.

    CJSF
    OK, I see what you're saying. Still extend the crew's quarters but with the whole ship rotating.

  14. #3674
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    The only possible advantage I can think of is that the crew could also live in the central part. I think it would be very disorienting to have the middle spinning. But if the crew is going to remain on the extended portions, then no, I don't see any advantage. I'm not sure if this is the case here (I don't know the show), but another potential advantage would be if you are for example orbiting the sun, and want to keep solar panels pointed in the same direction.
    The ship is headed towards Mars and has large solar panels deployed. I'd think as long as they kept the axis pointed towards the sun, it wouldn't matter if everything was rotating.

  15. #3675
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJSF View Post
    Regarding Away: Would there be an inherent and drastic advantage to spinning just a portion of the spacecraft for simulating gravity vs just spinning the whole ship on its axis? It would seem to be fairly substantial mass penalty to have they system they are using vs. a small amout of fuel to use RCS-type thrusters to initiate and halt a spin.nn
    I haven’t seen the show yet, but a couple issues with a spinning spacecraft (1) are that the gyroscopic motion can make it difficult to reorient and maneuver the spacecraft and (2) it can complicate design, adding forces to sections that might be easier to build if they don’t need to spin.

    To help with the gyroscopic motion it could help to have a counterrotating section to the spinning habitation section.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

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  16. #3676
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I haven’t seen the show yet, but a couple issues with a spinning spacecraft (1) are that the gyroscopic motion can make it difficult to reorient and maneuver the spacecraft and (2) it can complicate design, adding forces to sections that might be easier to build if they don’t need to spin.

    To help with the gyroscopic motion it could help to have a counterrotating section to the spinning habitation section.
    But if you only spin part, especially if it was extended out from the axis, wouldn't you still have the gyroscopic problem? Plus adding a massive pressurized bearing, or two if you have a counterrotating section?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  17. #3677
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    But if you only spin part, especially if it was extended out from the axis, wouldn't you still have the gyroscopic problem? Plus adding a massive pressurized bearing, or two if you have a counterrotating section?
    My understanding is that having counter-rotating masses will cancel out gyroscopic effects. Here’s a discussion I picked up on a quick google. Warning - I didn’t look at it too closely, but I think it is correct:

    https://physics.stackexchange.com/qu...ting-flywheels

    If I were designing things, I wouldn’t have a pressurized bearing. If they are spending most of their time in the rotating section, I’d pick an easier solution.

    The counter rotating mass doesn’t need to be inhabited. It just needs to have enough momentum to balance the inhabited section. It could be smaller mass but rotating faster.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  18. #3678
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    My understanding is that having counter-rotating masses will cancel out gyroscopic effects. Here’s a discussion I picked up on a quick google. Warning - I didn’t look at it too closely, but I think it is correct:

    https://physics.stackexchange.com/qu...ting-flywheels

    If I were designing things, I wouldn’t have a pressurized bearing. If they are spending most of their time in the rotating section, I’d pick an easier solution.

    The counter rotating mass doesn’t need to be inhabited. It just needs to have enough momentum to balance the inhabited section. It could be smaller mass but rotating faster.
    My thinking is that it would be unnecessarily complicated to do this, but perhaps I am wrong. I don't design any machinery, much less spacecraft.

    CJSF
    "The sun is a quagmire
    It's not made of fire
    Forget what you've been told in the past
    Electrons are free
    (Plasma!) Fourth state of matter
    Not gas, not liquid, not solid"

    -They Might Be Giants, "Why Does The Sun Really Shine?"


    lonelybirder.org

  19. #3679
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    There's a guy whose quarantine project, it appears, is a video series on YouTube called Tasting History. He's making old recipes and providing some of the history around them. And when I say "old," I mean I think the most recent one he's made was eighteenth century, maybe nineteenth, and he mostly does Medieval stuff. And older. I want this to be a cookbook.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  20. #3680
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    There's a guy whose quarantine project, it appears, is a video series on YouTube called Tasting History. He's making old recipes and providing some of the history around them. And when I say "old," I mean I think the most recent one he's made was eighteenth century, maybe nineteenth, and he mostly does Medieval stuff. And older. I want this to be a cookbook.
    There's a food historian / experimental archaeologist called Jacqui Wood, who is probably vaguely familiar to people who watch British documentaries with an archaeological theme.
    She has written a book entitled Tasting The Past, on pretty much exactly that topic. I can't vouch for the content, but it seems to get good reviews.

    Grant Hutchison

  21. #3681
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    The Dune trailer. Part 1 is due out in December 2020 and part 2, if it gets the green light, the following year or even 2022.

    It's an interesting cast, notable for selecting Dave Bautista as "Beast" Raban and Stellan Skarsgård as Baron Vladimir Harkonnen. But I don't know if the Part 2 roles have been cast yet. None that I can find anyway.

    We shall see. (Maybe this film needs it's own thread?)

  22. #3682
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    There's a guy whose quarantine project, it appears, is a video series on YouTube called Tasting History. He's making old recipes and providing some of the history around them. And when I say "old," I mean I think the most recent one he's made was eighteenth century, maybe nineteenth, and he mostly does Medieval stuff. And older. I want this to be a cookbook.
    I'll have to look that up, if our internet ever goes back to working. I'm reluctant to watch videos while I'm connecting via the phone. Meanwhile, you might be interested in Lobscouse and Spotted Dog (Which It's a Gastronomic Companion to the Aubrey/Maturin Novels), which actually is a cookbook. The authors also have a webpage.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  23. #3683
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    That particular cookbook is on my list, Treb! I don't have it yet, but I'm definitely interested.

    The kids are asleep, so I'm getting in some Twin Peaks.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  24. #3684
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    I've been watching the HBO series Vinyl (2016), about the American music industry in 1973. Although I didn't pay much attention to popular music at that time, I've recently developed a bit of a historical interest.

    Real people (for instance Andy Warhol, Alice Cooper and David Bowie) are portrayed by actors from time to time. In the episode I watched last night, there's a scene in the Hotel Chelsea in New York in which a character briefly passes a distraught-looking woman who is pulling a wig over what looks like one of those "humiliation shearings" dispensed to female collaborators in Europe at the end of the Second World War. I feel reasonably sure that's a nod to real event, but although I know a fair bit about the Hotel Chelsea during the '60s and '70s, I don't get the reference. Anyone?

    Grant Hutchison

  25. #3685
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    Ah-ha. A couple of episodes later, I think I've figured out it is supposed to be Holly Woodlawn, or a character based on her. I'll need to go back and look at the strange hair under the wig though--I'm not sure what that was about.

    Grant Hutchison

  26. #3686
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    Started watching Happy! ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy!_(TV_series) ) to give me something to mix with Zoo ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoo_(TV_series) )

    I'd been avoiding it as I expected the imaginary friend character (a blue, flying Unicorn, voiced by Patton Oswalt) would annoy the heck out of me. It doesn't, really loving it so far. Weird mix of horror, explicit action, anti-hero, cutesy hero, humour, serious ... with a story line that's complex enough to be interesting but not so much to be frustrating.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  27. #3687
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    I now have the only seven-year-old in the world who's a Twin Peaks fan, though there are definitely parts of the show he's not going to get to see for a few years at least.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  28. #3688
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    I enjoyed the recent NOVA program on gene splicing.

  29. #3689
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    I now have the only seven-year-old in the world who's a Twin Peaks fan, though there are definitely parts of the show he's not going to get to see for a few years at least.
    I hope that you can cook a good Cherry Pie as that will surely have taken his attention.

  30. #3690
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    As I don't like cherry pie myself, I don't bake it. And he's certainly not getting coffee. I can make doughnuts, though, and if I ever find my copy of The Access Guide to Twin Peaks, we'll make that doughnut recipe.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

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