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Thread: What are you watching?

  1. #4051
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    Well last night I watched St Louis Blues with Eartha Kitt, Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald and more, about WC Handy, “ father of the blues” . Wonderful B and W film. It was on Netflix. I forgot to note the date, but I can look it up.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  2. #4052
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Well last night I watched St Louis Blues with Eartha Kitt, Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald and more, about WC Handy, “ father of the blues” . Wonderful B and W film. It was on Netflix. I forgot to note the date, but I can look it up.
    Relying purely on memory, does the unforgettable Nat King Cole play W.C Handy in this film?

  3. #4053
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    Lupin. Two episodes only so far but it has my interest.

  4. #4054
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Relying purely on memory, does the unforgettable Nat King Cole play W.C Handy in this film?
    Yes he does, I don’t know if Handy could sing his own songs like that! Maybe he could! I presume it is true that he was recognised by the performance at Carnegie Hall. So many of those blues artists only got fame much later.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  5. #4055
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I seem to have gotten stuck watching British mystery shows on PBS. Last night was the premier episode of Vera and I recorded the third episode of Unforgotten. I also watched half an episode of Midsomer Murders during the week. The internet says it was a single episode but it got truncated with "to be continued". Wasn't that good. It was centered on archaeology and someone had been watching too much Time Team. Which I'm still watching on YouTube.
    Caught the second half of the Midsomer one last night. Still terrible, don't know why I bothered. This was season 17 or some such; was it better earlier on?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #4056
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    I watched "The Story of Menstruation," a Disney short from the '40s, for this afternoon's column.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  7. #4057
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    I watched the second season of Love, Death and Robots on Netflix. Again, this is an anthology show with short, mostly animated stories, with very different animation styles, some very realistic, others not. They are very short, on the order of fifteen minutes, so not a lot of time to develop a story. They are more of a quick glimpse of something happening in another world, rather than a developed story. Some are pretty violent or have disturbing implications, though I was actually surprised when a couple I thought would turn out badly had a good outcome.

    I think I liked the first season better, though I found watching the various bits interesting at least. I won’t rave about it but I didn’t feel my time was wasted either.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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  8. #4058
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    We have just finished our first week of watching this years Giro d'Italia. As usual lots of interesting scenery and good racing. It hasn't been on 'free to air' TV for the last 4 years but happily it is back this year. The time zones work out very nicely for us here. The race starts about 7PM (my local time) and usually finishes just after 11PM so we can normally see it all live.

  9. #4059
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    Oh! I should look for it on our TV!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #4060
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Oh! I should look for it on our TV!
    I see mention of it being available in the US on GCN+ - whatever that is.

  11. #4061
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    I see mention of it being available in the US on GCN+ - whatever that is.
    I looked it up (I had never heard of it). It is a streaming service called the “Global Cycling Network Plus” and is focused on IOS and Android apps (so might be harder to watch on a TV). Sounds incredibly specialized, but if you’re interested in that, might be worth it.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  12. #4062
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I looked it up (I had never heard of it). It is a streaming service called the “Global Cycling Network Plus” and is focused on IOS and Android apps (so might be harder to watch on a TV). Sounds incredibly specialized, but if you’re interested in that, might be worth it.
    Aah - I just assumed that it was one of the plethora of alphabet soup named TV networks that seem to exist.

  13. #4063
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    And this crash in the Giro today gives you an idea of why they get paid high wages. Definitely better him than me in this case.

    https://www.eurosport.com/cycling/gi...71/video.shtml

  14. #4064
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    This is more a case of what Iím not watching: Netflix has a show called ďJupiterís Legacy.Ē Itís another superhero show, but with characters Iíve never heard of. More important, after I finished the first episode, I was deeply confused and wondering what the heck I had just watched. Basically, youíre thrown into a world without context being provided. I watched a couple more episodes hoping it would get better, but it didnít really help. They split time between current day in their world and in the 1920s without explaining why. Eventually it starts becoming clear that the 1920s involve their origins, in what was then pretty much our world. I think it would have been better to start the show with origins and world background so viewers could get a handle on the story and not keep flipping back and forth like they did. Anyway, I was too confused to be able to get interested in the story and gave up on it.
    I kind of like it, but then the whole deconstructed/dark superhero thing is something I find interesting, if it explores ideas.

    Mainstream comic/movie superheroes work on what's called a "sliding timescale", preventing them from aging more than a few years unless they're out of print for long periods. At one point members of the Fantastic Four were World War II veterans. Now they started their careers "fifteen years ago", whenever the year is now. Using original characters means they can explore the related concepts more deeply than a series which fits an existing continuity.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  15. #4065
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    I started re-reading a Vera Stanhope novel yesterday because the associated TV episode was to be on in the evening. There's a character named "Mantel". When I first read the novel I mentally pronounced it as "Man-TELL". On TV they pronounced "Mantle"; you know, the shelf over the fireplace. That kind of bugged me. As did how greatly the TV changed the story.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #4066
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    I'm watching The Watch. One of the many screen interpretations of Discworld, this one includes some "magical" modern-looking technology inspired by "Roundworld", giving the series a very different feel than the steampunk-meets-Renaissance Faire setting usually portrayed. Yet it's a curious patchwork; there's electric thaumic guitars and streetlights, manual typewriters, the cameras are still imps in a box, crossbows replace guns, and there's still high magic.

    Their interpretations of Vimes and Lady Ramkin and their general casting choices are interesting, to say the least. In fact Carrot is the only character they played completely straight, which seems appropriate.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  17. #4067
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    I kind of like it, but then the whole deconstructed/dark superhero thing is something I find interesting, if it explores ideas.

    Mainstream comic/movie superheroes work on what's called a "sliding timescale", preventing them from aging more than a few years unless they're out of print for long periods. At one point members of the Fantastic Four were World War II veterans. Now they started their careers "fifteen years ago", whenever the year is now. Using original characters means they can explore the related concepts more deeply than a series which fits an existing continuity.
    I didn’t mind the extended lifetime issue (after all, they have powers, so why not?), but I would have liked more explanation and setup to start the story out. To me, it felt like I was being thrown into their world without enough information to understand what was going on, and without being given reason to care about these characters. As for the hero never kills debate, I always thought that was specifically done for kids comics and shows, but couldn’t possibly work in a “real world” situation where powers actually existed. So that argument just seemed ridiculous to me. They had a kill or be killed situation, when an innocent had already been killed. There is no realistic debate on what needed to be done there. Killing as a last resort, sure, but this was the last resort.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  18. #4068
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I didn’t mind the extended lifetime issue (after all, they have powers, so why not?), but I would have liked more explanation and setup to start the story out. To me, it felt like I was being thrown into their world without enough information to understand what was going on, and without being given reason to care about these characters. As for the hero never kills debate, I always thought that was specifically done for kids comics and shows, but couldn’t possibly work in a “real world” situation where powers actually existed. So that argument just seemed ridiculous to me. They had a kill or be killed situation, when an innocent had already been killed. There is no realistic debate on what needed to be done there. Killing as a last resort, sure, but this was the last resort.
    The point was the unrealism. The parents set impossible standards to live up to.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  19. #4069
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    The point was the unrealism. The parents set impossible standards to live up to.
    Well yes, as I said, it was a ridiculous argument. Or are you claiming there was something more subtle to this, like putting comic book arguments in a more realistic setting and showing how they can’t work? If it was supposed to be some kind of subtle commentary, it went right by me. As I said, I had enough trouble trying to make sense out of the show.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  20. #4070
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Well yes, as I said, it was a ridiculous argument. Or are you claiming there was something more subtle to this, like putting comic book arguments in a more realistic setting and showing how they can’t work? If it was supposed to be some kind of subtle commentary, it went right by me. As I said, I had enough trouble trying to make sense out of the show.
    It's not for everyone, granted. It's about taking apart the conventions of a genre, and if you aren't familiar with those conventions then the deconstruction is meaningless to you. It's busting a myth you've never heard of before.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  21. #4071
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    It's not for everyone, granted. It's about taking apart the conventions of a genre, and if you aren't familiar with those conventions then the deconstruction is meaningless to you. It's busting a myth you've never heard of before.
    Iím very familiar with the ďheroes donít killĒ trope in shows and stories and Iím familiar with shows and stories that donít do that, or make a point about it. Heck, Amazon Prime has two shows that touch on that right now. The way this show handled it was ridiculous.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  22. #4072
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I’m very familiar with the “heroes don’t kill” trope in shows and stories and I’m familiar with shows and stories that don’t do that, or make a point about it. Heck, Amazon Prime has two shows that touch on that right now. The way this show handled it was ridiculous.
    I kind of like it... I'm not in love with it, but it entertains me so far.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  23. #4073
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    I've been watching Rob Bell's The Buildings That Fought Hitler, which examines the remains of the wartime infrastructure within the UK--coastal defences, stop-line fortifications, Chain Home Radar stations, underground bunkers, and so on.
    The most recent episode told the story of something I'd never even heard of--the GHQ Auxilliary Units. During Word War II the UK was the only country in Europe to set up a resistance network in anticipation of being invaded. All across the country, local people were trained in sabotage, communication and surveillance techniques; Canadian engineers were brought in to dig underground hideouts, and then returned to their own country, so that a minimum number of people knew these locations. All these activities were covered by the Official Secrets Act, and those involved were forbidden to talk about it, even after the war. So a lot of information is only just coming to light as we reach the 75-year limit for the declassification of the relevant documents. We know where some of the hideouts are, but many more probably still exist, some even containing munitions, but their locations have been lost. The only recognition those involved received was a letter from the government, and a little enamel lapel badge. Astonishing stuff.

    My favourite nugget of information concerned how someone on the surface was supposed to communicate to those in the underground hideout that they wished to enter. Each team member would carry a coloured glass marble, which they would drop down a fake rabbit hole. When the marble clonked into its receptacle underground, those manning the hideout would quickly crank open the concealed entrance.

    Grant Hutchison

  24. #4074
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I've been watching Rob Bell's The Buildings That Fought Hitler, which examines the remains of the wartime infrastructure within the UK--coastal defences, stop-line fortifications, Chain Home Radar stations, underground bunkers, and so on.
    The most recent episode told the story of something I'd never even heard of--the GHQ Auxilliary Units. During Word War II the UK was the only country in Europe to set up a resistance network in anticipation of being invaded. All across the country, local people were trained in sabotage, communication and surveillance techniques; Canadian engineers were brought in to dig underground hideouts, and then returned to their own country, so that a minimum number of people knew these locations. All these activities were covered by the Official Secrets Act, and those involved were forbidden to talk about it, even after the war. So a lot of information is only just coming to light as we reach the 75-year limit for the declassification of the relevant documents. We know where some of the hideouts are, but many more probably still exist, some even containing munitions, but their locations have been lost. The only recognition those involved received was a letter from the government, and a little enamel lapel badge. Astonishing stuff.

    My favourite nugget of information concerned how someone on the surface was supposed to communicate to those in the underground hideout that they wished to enter. Each team member would carry a coloured glass marble, which they would drop down a fake rabbit hole. When the marble clonked into its receptacle underground, those manning the hideout would quickly crank open the concealed entrance.

    Grant Hutchison
    That reminds me of something I watched recently on CBS News' "60 Minutes". A segment on the World War II unit known as "The Ritchie Boys"; something I had never heard anything about, and also apparently only made public recently.

    LINK
    Tonight we'll introduce you to members of a secret American intelligence unit who fought in World War II. What's most extraordinary about this group: many of them were German-born Jews who fled their homeland, came to America, and then joined the U.S. Army. Their mission: to use their knowledge of the German language and culture to return to Europe and fight Nazism. The Ritchie Boys, as they were known, trained in espionage and frontline interrogation. And incredibly, they were responsible for most of the combat intelligence gathered on the Western Front. For decades, they didn't discuss their work. Fortunately, some of the Ritchie Boys are still around to tell their tales, and that includes the life force that is Guy Stern, age 99.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  25. #4075
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    This is WWII related too - a free video (fairly technical) on Colossus, a specialized electronic computer designed to break Enigma messages rapidly. Hereís the link:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g2tMcMQqSbA

    Quite a number of years ago Iíd hear something about a device called Colossus with some hints it was similar to Eniac but predated it. The UK kept very quiet about it for a very long time, so it really has only been openly discussed for the last 20 years or so. This explained a lot more than I had heard previously.

    Basically, Colossus dramatically sped up reading Enigma, so they were well and truly broken encryption machines. The speaker in the show estimates it shortened the war by one or two years and saved hundreds of thousands of lives.

    There are sad things though too - the key inventor never was truly recognized for his work during his lifetime, and ended WWII in debt because he used some of his own money to build the first machine. Other things that were pioneered didnít go into later computer development because most of the machines were destroyed along with documentation, and it was all very secret, leaving others to independently reinvent them.

    It was definitely not a general purpose programmable computer, but nonetheless did many things that hadnít been done before and was the most complex electronic machine of its time.

    The format of the show is a fellow giving a lecture and it is fairly long, so may be hard to watch for some (I usually avoid long lectures - they were my least favorite thing in my university days even) but there is good information.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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  26. #4076
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    There are sad things though too - the key inventor never was truly recognized for his work during his lifetime, and ended WWII in debt because he used some of his own money to build the first machine.
    Ah, the marvellous Tommy Flowers. The story goes that after the war he tried to get a loan so that he could build a new computer, but the banks he approached thought it was a stupid and unworkable idea, and of course he couldn't tell them that he'd already built a working version because he was still bound by the Official Secrets Act. At least he lived long enough to see the full story come out in the 1990s.

    Grant Hutchison

  27. #4077
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    I've been watching The Bad Batch. It's a Star Wars cartoon if you haven't heard of it.

    The most standout thing is one of the anti-heroes has a massive scar on the side of his head. There are times when he stops or stumbles and holds his head for no obvious reason. The character is sort of impulsive, but having this one thing happen for no immediate reason leads me to think that they will actually do something serious with it.

    I kind of feel the same way about this show as I did Stargate Universe. It's sort of good, but not really good.
    Solfe

  28. #4078
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    Aside from watching The Chase (UK), then "The News" while eating dinner, and any 8 Out Of Ten Cats Does Countdown that's on, most of my watching tends to be bingeing series.
    "Recently" finished or in:

    The Legend of Korra: Just awesome television for me. Not a dud episode in the lot.
    Superstore: Stopped seeming as fresh and clever by the fifth season, but still a stand-out sitcom.
    Star Trek Discovery: Season 3 seems way better than 1 and 2 to me. Enjoyed a lot. Death to the mirror universe!
    Z Nation: (I'm currently in season 4) Many plot holes and bits of incomprehensibility, but greatly enjoying this - more than The Walking Dead. (Though that's tied up with my ex-wife perhaps).
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  29. #4079
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    Z Nation: (I'm currently in season 4) Many plot holes and bits of incomprehensibility, but greatly enjoying this - more than The Walking Dead. (Though that's tied up with my ex-wife perhaps).
    ....No, I can't say it.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  30. #4080
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    Quote Originally Posted by pzkpfw View Post
    Star Trek Discovery: Season 3 seems way better than 1 and 2 to me. Enjoyed a lot. Death to the mirror universe!
    Yes, it felt more like actual Star Trek - problems, but hopeful, with the Federation doing what it is supposed to. I had some quibbles, but it didnít have massive annoyances like season 1 and 2. Heck, I was liking season 2 until they went nuts with the time travel/Skynet Control story and Michael became the Chosen One.

    Just watched Guns Akimbo on Amazon Prime. I wonít say it is a great movie, it is violent, but it didnít feel like it was meant to be taken that seriously. It didnít bore me or annoy me, which is pretty good these days.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

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