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Thread: Some Non-trivial Things That Annoy Me.

  1. #4711
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    My home PC is close to complete failure. I am getting multiple 'blue screens of death' most days - always with different error codes. It is often locked into a beep code at startup and requires numerous power resets to get it going. It seems that it could be the Video Card but the whole machine is coming up to 6 years old so it may be in a terminal decline.

    And just to make it better, my Evaporative Air-conditioner, called a 'Swamp Cooler' by some of you, has become a hot air blower. Naturally this has occurred at the hottest time of the year, 36 C today and up to 41C by Friday. And of course getting someone in at this time of year is not easy but they will be coming next Monday. Luckily we have 'Refrigerated' A/C in a couple of rooms so we will survive until then. After all I lived the first half of my life without any A/C at home so I am still better-off.
    At least the Air Conditioner is now back in working order at minimal (for this day and age) expense. The problem was a worn out float valve. It was only letting a bit of water drip onto the pads so there was some cooling effect in the milder weather. However, once the temperature got above 30 C the amount of water on the pads wasn't enough to allow for any useful effect..

  2. #4712
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    Does the evaporative cooler work well for you there? We had it one place, when I was a kid in Albuquerque, NM, and it usually wasn’t too bad (though not like the cooling of a regular air conditioner) but every now and then the desert climate would turn humid, and then it was next to useless.

    I’ve always insisted on central air as an adult because of that and one other item (another story - in a different house in my youth my father had two monster room air conditioners installed, and those rooms were downright freezing while the rest of the house was hot).

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

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  3. #4713
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Does the evaporative cooler work well for you there? We had it one place, when I was a kid in Albuquerque, NM, and it usually wasn’t too bad (though not like the cooling of a regular air conditioner) but every now and then the desert climate would turn humid, and then it was next to useless.

    I’ve always insisted on central air as an adult because of that and one other item (another story - in a different house in my youth my father had two monster room air conditioners installed, and those rooms were downright freezing while the rest of the house was hot).
    It normally works pretty well here except on the really, really hot days and we normally only get a few days in summer when the humidity is bad enough to stop it being effective. We do have two areas that have their own 'regular' air-conditioning so if the weather is really bad we can use those.

  4. #4714
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    My anxiety has been spiking all week. I feel hyper-alert and feel like I might miss something in current events. I've already gone back on my one-day pledge to avoid the news. Didn't even make it 24 hours.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  5. #4715
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    I've continued to avoid the news except when I'm in the room where my wife watches it. But when I'm not in there she keeps texting it to me.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #4716
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    Of course, it depends on your views and how you look at issues, but as I mentioned elsewhere Iíve been really liking a number of the stories recently. Some have made me really happy. Some have been hilarious, to me at least. For instance, a certain story involving Twitter. There is good and bad, of course, but perhaps trying to not focus too much on the news that bothers you, but not ignoring the rest, would help.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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  7. #4717
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    There is good and bad, of course, but perhaps trying to not focus too much on the news that bothers you, but not ignoring the rest, would help.
    If I could do that, I wouldn't have anxiety to start with.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  8. #4718
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    To clarify, my anxiety is a psychological issue, not just worry. It's diagnosed and requires treatment. I'm currently on medication and therapy for it, among other things.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  9. #4719
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    To clarify, my anxiety is a psychological issue, not just worry. It's diagnosed and requires treatment. I'm currently on medication and therapy for it, among other things.
    Iím not entirely unfamiliar. Iíve mentioned elsewhere that I had serious anxiety and insomnia while taking care of my mother when she had worsening dementia. She would wander and every so often would have a fall (she had a walker but would forget to use it) which could happen at any time, so I was constantly on edge. Iíve had other reasons for anxiety in recent years, like a heart condition that left me at a point where any real exertion wasnít possible (that was dramatically improved with a heart procedure but that was anxiety inducing as well). I tried medicine (though avoiding benzodiazepines) but they didnít do much. The anxiety didnít just end when she died either, but eventually faded. It helped to make lifestyle changes. But one of the results is that 2020 was a fairly good year for me simply because for me, personally, it was actually a much less stressful year than recent ones. Which isnít to say I was untouched by events by any means.

    As for my comments, itís just that it feels to me things got to a really bad point recently, but that also set in motion some important changes that strike me as very good things, things I had wanted to see for some time, so it feels like the situation is improving. I donít pretend to have any expertise, but I thought, perhaps consciously making an effort to focus on the better news might help.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  10. #4720
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    I have been trained by professional therapists in a number of coping strategies and processes for dealing with anxiety. I'm using them all.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  11. #4721
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    We had a windstorm blow through the region last night and our power has been off for hours. We are better off than most because we have a generator running on propane to give us lights and even internet but there are big outages all over the region. The generator doesn't give us heat and it's getting cold.
    And oops, as I type, it's come back on. Good, I hope it warms up soon. And that it stays on.

    What really bugs me is the local utility. About ten years ago a "Public Utility District" took over distribution from a large private company. They employ roughly the same technical staff, I suppose, but the management are literally amateurs. Their outage information system is utterly useless.

    On the trivial side, there's my usual homophone problem. I typed the last sentence above beginning with "There". Then I saw it and went back and changed it to "They're". Dam!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  12. #4722
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    Our power only went out for about an hour, but there's this huge project down the hill from us that I suspect might include burying power lines, so every time I drive the kids anywhere after heavy winds, they have to listen to my rant about how, seriously, there's no reason for our power lines to be subject to serious weather this way.
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  13. #4723
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    A couple of days ago we had our first shark attack in the Swan River for 50 years. The swimmer was seriously injured but happily he is recovering. The last fatal attack in the river was 97 years ago. Everyone 'knows' that Bull Sharks are in the river - they breed in the upper reaches and the young then migrate out of the river to live along the coast. But as attacks have been so rare you just shut up that questioning part of your mind. I have only seen one "probable" shark, from a bridge, in over 60 years of living near the river system. It is years since I have swum in the river so it will not affect me but some people will certainly be re-considering their activities - my brother use a sailboard in the river on a regular basis.

  14. #4724
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Our power only went out for about an hour, but there's this huge project down the hill from us that I suspect might include burying power lines, so every time I drive the kids anywhere after heavy winds, they have to listen to my rant about how, seriously, there's no reason for our power lines to be subject to serious weather this way.
    Oh, there'$ a rea$on....
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #4725
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    Yesterday morning I went to do some work in the garden and when I bent down something black kept appearing in the 'side' of my eye. After several minutes of trying to clean my glasses and cutting my eyebrows I realised that it was inside the eye. It looks like a black disc in the eye that moves down when I bend over. It almost seemed to behave like the bubble in a spirit level.

    Today I got my eye dilated and had lots of bright lights shone into it. The diagnosis was that I have had a "Posterior Vitreous Detachment" which is "a condition where your vitreous comes away from the retina at the back of your eye.". Happily there is no retinal tearing. There is no "reasonable' treatment and apparently the brain will eventually 'ignore' the black spot - similar to the way it ignores the "blind spot" in every eye.

    The good news is that the eye that has been affected is my 'bad' one. Due to a childhood injury I have less than 10% vision in that eye. I can see light and shadows and just see my outstretched hand in bright condition. Still it is of some use and I am glad that at least that little bit of vision will remain.

  16. #4726
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    Well, I've spent the last three weeks enduring the non-trival agony of a case of shingles, also known as the varicella-zoster virus. If you had the chicken pox and haven't gotten the vaccine for this one, I strongly advise that you do. This idiot somehow let her inoculation slip through the cracks. Oww.

  17. #4727
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Yesterday morning I went to do some work in the garden and when I bent down something black kept appearing in the 'side' of my eye. After several minutes of trying to clean my glasses and cutting my eyebrows I realised that it was inside the eye. It looks like a black disc in the eye that moves down when I bend over. It almost seemed to behave like the bubble in a spirit level.

    Today I got my eye dilated and had lots of bright lights shone into it. The diagnosis was that I have had a "Posterior Vitreous Detachment" which is "a condition where your vitreous comes away from the retina at the back of your eye.". Happily there is no retinal tearing. There is no "reasonable' treatment and apparently the brain will eventually 'ignore' the black spot - similar to the way it ignores the "blind spot" in every eye.

    The good news is that the eye that has been affected is my 'bad' one. Due to a childhood injury I have less than 10% vision in that eye. I can see light and shadows and just see my outstretched hand in bright condition. Still it is of some use and I am glad that at least that little bit of vision will remain.
    That sucks.
    Quote Originally Posted by Selenite View Post
    Well, I've spent the last three weeks enduring the non-trival agony of a case of shingles, also known as the varicella-zoster virus. If you had the chicken pox and haven't gotten the vaccine for this one, I strongly advise that you do. This idiot somehow let her inoculation slip through the cracks. Oww.
    And that really sucks. Shingles scares me, as I had chicken pox and I know some people who have had it bad. I got the vaccine a couple of years ago - got the newer, two dose one. I hope it works.

    Everyone get better soon.
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  18. #4728
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selenite View Post
    Well, I've spent the last three weeks enduring the non-trival agony of a case of shingles, also known as the varicella-zoster virus. If you had the chicken pox and haven't gotten the vaccine for this one, I strongly advise that you do. This idiot somehow let her inoculation slip through the cracks. Oww.
    I am in the first generation to get vaccinated for chicken pox in the US, but I’m somewhat worried that because the vaccine is so new, the oldest people vaccinated are only slightly older than me and so we will not know if it provides protection for a lifetime until my cohort are all older. Hopefully it does work for a lifetime, or if it doesn’t, we can learn that in time and I can get a booster shot in time instead of getting shingles when I am older.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
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  19. #4729
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    I am in the first generation to get vaccinated for chicken pox in the US, but I’m somewhat worried that because the vaccine is so new, the oldest people vaccinated are only slightly older than me and so we will not know if it provides protection for a lifetime until my cohort are all older. Hopefully it does work for a lifetime, or if it doesn’t, we can learn that in time and I can get a booster shot in time instead of getting shingles when I am older.
    I'm glad you were likely spared this affliction. Unfortunately, I got the chicken pox at three months old, so I have no memory of the event. That probably made it easier to overlook, especially with the current titanic medical emergency going on. I'm certainly pleased a shingles vaccine will spare many this misfortune and will get one as soon as this malady has run it's course.

    After the misery I've been through, I find the anti-vaxxer mentality even more difficult to fathom.

  20. #4730
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    That sucks.

    And that really sucks. Shingles scares me, as I had chicken pox and I know some people who have had it bad. I got the vaccine a couple of years ago - got the newer, two dose one. I hope it works.

    Everyone get better soon.
    Thanks! I'm trying.

  21. #4731
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selenite View Post
    Well, I've spent the last three weeks enduring the non-trival agony of a case of shingles, also known as the varicella-zoster virus. If you had the chicken pox and haven't gotten the vaccine for this one, I strongly advise that you do. This idiot somehow let her inoculation slip through the cracks. Oww.
    Yes shingles are fun. My wife and have both had it but luckily we recognised the symptoms early enough to get the anti viral shot within the 72 hour 'effective' period. So we got a few days of pain instead of your very unpleasant three weeks. I hope you are now feeling better and didn't get any scarring.

  22. #4732
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Yes shingles are fun. My wife and have both had it but luckily we recognised the symptoms early enough to get the anti viral shot within the 72 hour 'effective' period. So we got a few days of pain instead of your very unpleasant three weeks. I hope you are now feeling better and didn't get any scarring.
    An anti-viral shot? Interesting.They gave me anti-viral tablets (Valacyclovir) that I took over the course of a week after the day the rash appeared. I still ended up with about three weeks of a burn-like pain, although the rash healed pretty quickly. The pain-killers they prescribed were rather ineffective. I had better results with aspirin.

  23. #4733
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    Quote Originally Posted by Selenite View Post
    An anti-viral shot? Interesting.They gave me anti-viral tablets (Valacyclovir) that I took over the course of a week after the day the rash appeared. I still ended up with about three weeks of a burn-like pain, although the rash healed pretty quickly. The pain-killers they prescribed were rather ineffective. I had better results with aspirin.
    Shot - gaah - this was about 15 years ago and I had forgotten that it was tablets - sorry. What I do remember is that the Dr had to ring up our Federal Dept. of Health to get approval to write a prescription, under our Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, for the tablets. They had to be satisfied that it was within the 72 hour period so it would have a reasonable chance of being useful. The medicine was subsidised, not free, if approval to use it was obtained. The approval process, including the phone call, only took 5 minutes. I had a pretty bad first three or four days as the rash was on my face and threatening my good eye. Luckily it didn't do any damage and it seemed to clear up pretty quickly after that. I was far luckier than you.

  24. #4734
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Yesterday morning I went to do some work in the garden and when I bent down something black kept appearing in the 'side' of my eye. After several minutes of trying to clean my glasses and cutting my eyebrows I realised that it was inside the eye. It looks like a black disc in the eye that moves down when I bend over. It almost seemed to behave like the bubble in a spirit level.

    Today I got my eye dilated and had lots of bright lights shone into it. The diagnosis was that I have had a "Posterior Vitreous Detachment" which is "a condition where your vitreous comes away from the retina at the back of your eye.". Happily there is no retinal tearing. There is no "reasonable' treatment and apparently the brain will eventually 'ignore' the black spot - similar to the way it ignores the "blind spot" in every eye.

    The good news is that the eye that has been affected is my 'bad' one. Due to a childhood injury I have less than 10% vision in that eye. I can see light and shadows and just see my outstretched hand in bright condition. Still it is of some use and I am glad that at least that little bit of vision will remain.
    Actually, everyone gets posterior vitreous detachment at some time, late 50s onwards. Your vitreous becomes less flexible and shrinks slightly with age, and eventually lifts off the retina. Most people never notice this happening, but in a small proportion the vitreous sticks to the retina and then pops free, producing a shower of cellular debris (floaters) and an interesting display of lights (flashers). If you're very short-sighted your retina is a little more fragile around the edges, and you're more likely to sustain damage, which can include a haemorrhage into the vitreous, a tear in the retina and (if no action is taken) a retinal detachment and permanent vision loss in part of the visual field. So sudden onset of floaters and flashers is always a cue to get yourself to an optometrist as promptly as you can, because the retinal detachment can be prevented. (Forgive my bold, folks, but it's something that everyone of a certain age should know, particularly if they're short-sighted.)
    As an extremely short-sighted person, I'm a sitting duck for a complicated vitreous detachment, and sure enough I've had one in each eye.
    I got very lucky on both occasions. The first occurred five hours before we were due to fly off to spend two weeks in a wilderness lodge in Canada; the second, last year, when we would have been on a small ship in the Aleutians were it not for the Current Unpleasantness.
    The first involved a vitreous haemorrhage, which took the form of a long black octopus tentacle extending itself from the lateral side of my field of vision suddenly, and waving around dramatically--so instead of flying to Canada I had laser surgery to tack down the edges of the retinal tear. The second was a shower of floaters and an arc of blue-white flashing in my peripheral vision, with no tear.
    Now, three years after the first and one year after the second, I still have arcs of blue lights in my peripheral vision when I move my eyes from side to side in a darkened room. Your brain certainly does become used to the floaters, and although I have a mass of them in both eyes, they're not usually bothersome. They're more noticeable in bright light, when the pupils constrict, because that projects a cleaner shadow on to the retina--so I wear sunglasses outdoors a lot. And they have a tendency to show up if I'm sitting in a dark room looking at a bright screen.

    (The only treatment for the floaters is a vitrectomy, which is to remove the vitreous from the affected eye and replace it with saline solution. Not without hazard to one's vision, which is why it's generally considered "unreasonable"--the cure has the potential to be worse than the disease, in almost all cases.)

    Grant Hutchison

  25. #4735
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    So is this thread for things that annoy the people posting them, or for things that annoy Big Don, regardless of who post?
    A: "Things that are equal to the same are equal to each other"
    B: "The two sides of this triangle are things that are equal to the same"
    C: "If A and B are true, Z must be true"
    D: "If A and B and C are true, Z must be true"
    E: "If A and B and C and D are true, Z must be true"

    Therefore, Z: "The two sides of this triangle are equal to each other"

  26. #4736
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Actually, everyone gets posterior vitreous detachment at some time, late 50s onwards. Your vitreous becomes less flexible and shrinks slightly with age, and eventually lifts off the retina. Most people never notice this happening, but in a small proportion the vitreous sticks to the retina and then pops free, producing a shower of cellular debris (floaters) and an interesting display of lights (flashers). If you're very short-sighted your retina is a little more fragile around the edges, and you're more likely to sustain damage, which can include a haemorrhage into the vitreous, a tear in the retina and (if no action is taken) a retinal detachment and permanent vision loss in part of the visual field. So sudden onset of floaters and flashers is always a cue to get yourself to an optometrist as promptly as you can, because the retinal detachment can be prevented. (Forgive my bold, folks, but it's something that everyone of a certain age should know, particularly if they're short-sighted.)
    As an extremely short-sighted person, I'm a sitting duck for a complicated vitreous detachment, and sure enough I've had one in each eye.
    I got very lucky on both occasions. The first occurred five hours before we were due to fly off to spend two weeks in a wilderness lodge in Canada; the second, last year, when we would have been on a small ship in the Aleutians were it not for the Current Unpleasantness.
    The first involved a vitreous haemorrhage, which took the form of a long black octopus tentacle extending itself from the lateral side of my field of vision suddenly, and waving around dramatically--so instead of flying to Canada I had laser surgery to tack down the edges of the retinal tear. The second was a shower of floaters and an arc of blue-white flashing in my peripheral vision, with no tear.
    Now, three years after the first and one year after the second, I still have arcs of blue lights in my peripheral vision when I move my eyes from side to side in a darkened room. Your brain certainly does become used to the floaters, and although I have a mass of them in both eyes, they're not usually bothersome. They're more noticeable in bright light, when the pupils constrict, because that projects a cleaner shadow on to the retina--so I wear sunglasses outdoors a lot. And they have a tendency to show up if I'm sitting in a dark room looking at a bright screen.

    (The only treatment for the floaters is a vitrectomy, which is to remove the vitreous from the affected eye and replace it with saline solution. Not without hazard to one's vision, which is why it's generally considered "unreasonable"--the cure has the potential to be worse than the disease, in almost all cases.)

    Grant Hutchison
    The optometrist went through the various signs and symptoms, pretty much as described by you, to look out for. My eye is so messed up inside that now I have read about this condition I was obviously a prime candidate for such an occurrence. My 'black disc' seems quite minor compared to your cephalopod. Although, funnily enough, it is the clearest thing I have seen with that eye in nearly 60 years. He described any operation as pointless for me - and you certainly confirmed that point of view.

  27. #4737
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    The optometrist went through the various signs and symptoms, pretty much as described by you, to look out for. My eye is so messed up inside that now I have read about this condition I was obviously a prime candidate for such an occurrence. My 'black disc' seems quite minor compared to your cephalopod. Although, funnily enough, it is the clearest thing I have seen with that eye in nearly 60 years. He described any operation as pointless for me - and you certainly confirmed that point of view.
    Sorry if I seemed to be preaching at you--I was sure you'd have had the full briefing. My remarks were mainly aimed at anyone else reading this thread, because the signs and complications of posterior vitreous detachment seem to be poorly known, but are potentially very important.

    The waving black octopus tentacle was certainly a remarkable experience--I actually recoiled backwards and gave a small cry as it happened. It was immediately evident, at a real visceral level, that something deeply sinister had just occurred--so I was spared that period of puzzlement and casting around for simple benign reasons that you experienced.

    Grant Hutchison

  28. #4738
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Sorry if I seemed to be preaching at you--I was sure you'd have had the full briefing. My remarks were mainly aimed at anyone else reading this thread, because the signs and complications of posterior vitreous detachment seem to be poorly known, but are potentially very important.

    The waving black octopus tentacle was certainly a remarkable experience--I actually recoiled backwards and gave a small cry as it happened. It was immediately evident, at a real visceral level, that something deeply sinister had just occurred--so I was spared that period of puzzlement and casting around for simple benign reasons that you experienced.

    Grant Hutchison
    No my apologies are directed to you for my causing a misunderstanding as I certainly didn't think you were preaching at me. I was trying, in what I see now is an obviously ham-fisted way, to support your ,(admonitions), edit: sorry, strong suggestion to others to look out for these occurrences. I was certainly not really aware of them until the last few days. Like a lot of people I slackened off on doing some things last year including visiting the optometrist for an annual checkup. I doubt that this problem could have been prevented but it was still a silly thing to postpone.

    Even my 'disc' was very disconcerting I can pretty much understand what feelings your manifestation caused.
    Last edited by ozduck; 2021-Jan-22 at 03:03 PM.

  29. #4739
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    One of the interesting effects of a vitreous detachment for me was a regular grid of red dots that appeared when I closed the affected eye. I got into the ophthalmologist as soon as I noticed something different due to a long history of retinal problems in my family.

    Selenite, so sorry about the shingles. It's awful. We both got the new vaccine as soon as we could. It was a bit delayed for my wife because she had an active case at the time!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  30. #4740
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Yesterday morning I went to do some work in the garden and when I bent down something black kept appearing in the 'side' of my eye.
    I had a similar experience after having cataract surgery earlier this month. I would occasionally see an arc-like shadow in my right eye's peripheral vision. Turns out it's the edge of my spiffy new intraocular lens implant. It happens most often when my eyes are a bit dialated but my brain seems to be filtering it already.

    On a related, annoying note: I also have Epithelial Basement Membrane Dystrophy (EBMD). I've had it for some years now and aside from some corneal dryness and occasional irritation, it has seldom troubled me...until about 48 hours ago. It then presented as the sensation of a large, hot, sharp-edged pebble lodged in my left eye. I've spent the last two days in my recliner with a cool compress over both eyes. I had to one-eye it for some things, of course but couldn't do it for long. As one eye moves, so does the other and my closed left eyelid felt like sandpaper as the cornea moved against it.

    Things are much better this morning but far from 100%. I'll probably spend more time with the compress and I'll definitely be placing a call to my opthalmologist's office, in case this affects my second cataract surgery scheduled for next week.
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