Page 169 of 173 FirstFirst ... 69119159167168169170171 ... LastLast
Results 5,041 to 5,070 of 5171

Thread: Some Non-trivial Things That Annoy Me.

  1. #5041
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,576
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I wonder if your recall of your smallpox vaccination might be mixed with recall of the "Heaf Gun" (scroll down for pictures), which was extensively used to test for TB antibodies in schoolchildren, back in the day. It introduced tuberculin into the skin in a classic little hexagon of punctures. If you generated a local flower-shaped inflammatory response then you already already had TB antibodies and didn't need a vaccination.
    That looks much like what Iím thinking of, but did they even do regular TB testing and vaccination in the US? I certainly never heard anything about it from parents or doctors. This does get into very fuzzy memories, and from around that age they are mostly just visual memories of certain events and associated feelings (though I do have one memory thatís part visual, taste and emotion, of picking up a candy I hadnít finished and it tasting very sour, spitting it out and seeing it covered with ants). I think these memories are usually of events that made a significant impression for one reason or another.

    Well, I do feel on much firmer ground with the polio vaccination memory, as there is an associated memory of a toy I was given that I had for years after, and I would recall the memory long before I understand the significance of the sugar cube.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  2. #5042
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,218
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    That looks much like what I’m thinking of, but did they even do regular TB testing and vaccination in the US? I certainly never heard anything about it from parents or doctors.
    "Universal" tuberculin skin testing of children was "required" in the USA during the '60s and '70s, according to the opening sentence of this review article.
    I've given up trying to understand how allegedly universal alleged requirements work in practice in healthcare in the USA, but it would seem it was a thing that was going on, as was the case in the UK during the same time period.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  3. #5043
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,763
    The TB ďTineĒ test was performed on everyone in my grade school in New Jersey circa 1970. I donít recall how frequently it was done.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  4. #5044
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,218
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    The TB “Tine” test was performed on everyone in my grade school in New Jersey circa 1970. I don’t recall how frequently it was done.
    Tine looked a lot like Heaf, I think. Usually just administered once--if you tested negative, you were given the BCG vaccine.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  5. #5045
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    32,049
    I definitely remember a TB test as a child.

    Yesterday, we decided it was time for a new modem/router. Our old one has started dropping wifi signal, which is not helpful in a household with as many things on wifi as ours. We bought what we thought was a modem/router combo. It was not. It was just a router. So now, we've had to order one online that will be here Sunday. And I found out that you can't same-day return items you bought on in-store pick-up. There is, in my opinion, no reason for this. What's more, there is a lot that Target wants you to do online that is just not set up to do in-store; it's unnecessarily complicated to deal with gift cards, for example. But do a lot of people buy separate modems and routers? And why are they so expensive? Most of the modem/router combos I saw were well over a hundred dollars,w ith some of them well over three hundred. Also, in semi-related grumbling, why does my house, which is relatively new and also was remodeled relatively recently, only have one cable connection, in the living room?
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  6. #5046
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,521
    We got TB tested in school when I was a kid.
    My late mother-in-law grew up on a farm drinking raw milk and always tested positive for TB. Never had the disease as far as I know.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  7. #5047
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    14,259
    I was tested on a regular basis while in the military and I have been since being diagnosed with RA. Interesting timing for this subject, too. It was about this time last year that I was dealing with an annoying false positive result.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  8. #5048
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    7,057

  9. #5049
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,218
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    My late mother-in-law grew up on a farm drinking raw milk and always tested positive for TB. Never had the disease as far as I know.
    Like my little chums at school who had a positive Heaf test, she'll have had a primary TB infection with mild symptoms, which then resolved. In my final medical exam I was shown a chest X-ray with a calcified nodule visible in the middle of an otherwise normal lung field, which is the residuum of such a resolved infection, called a Ghon focus.

    (Things that bug me--people who write "GHON focus", as if it's an acronym. It's named after the pathologist Aton Ghon.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  10. #5050
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    14,259
    I received my initial vaccinations in basic training this way.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Jetgun vaccination - 3704 Flt 511 May 1987.jpg 
Views:	122 
Size:	267.1 KB 
ID:	26324

    That's not me, by the way. This photo was taken in 1987. I underwent training in 1978 and at that time, they had us link arms and go through the line in pairs so one could catch the other in case of fainting.
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. ó Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  11. #5051
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,576
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    "Universal" tuberculin skin testing of children was "required" in the USA during the '60s and '70s, according to the opening sentence of this review article.
    Okay, testing makes sense. I was confused because you mentioned TB testing *and* vaccination. As far as Iím aware, TB vaccination has never been done generally in the US because of issues with the vaccine. This is what the CDC says about the vaccine:

    https://www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/...ention/bcg.htm

    BCG, or bacille Calmette-Guerin, is a vaccine for tuberculosis (TB) disease. Many foreign-born persons have been BCG-vaccinated. BCG is used in many countries with a high prevalence of TB to prevent childhood tuberculous meningitis and miliary disease. However, BCG is not generally recommended for use in the United States because of the low risk of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the variable effectiveness of the vaccine against adult pulmonary TB, and the vaccineís potential interference with tuberculin skin test reactivity. The BCG vaccine should be considered only for very select persons who meet specific criteria and in consultation with a TB expert.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  12. #5052
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,218
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Okay, testing makes sense. I was confused because you mentioned TB testing *and* vaccination. As far as I’m aware, TB vaccination has never been done generally in the US because of issues with the vaccine. This is what the CDC says about the vaccine:

    https://www.cdc.gov/tb/publications/...ention/bcg.htm
    BCG, or bacille Calmette-Guerin, is a vaccine for tuberculosis (TB) disease. Many foreign-born persons have been BCG-vaccinated. BCG is used in many countries with a high prevalence of TB to prevent childhood tuberculous meningitis and miliary disease. However, BCG is not generally recommended for use in the United States because of the low risk of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the variable effectiveness of the vaccine against adult pulmonary TB, and the vaccine’s potential interference with tuberculin skin test reactivity. The BCG vaccine should be considered only for very select persons who meet specific criteria and in consultation with a TB expert.
    Not really an issue with vaccine itself (which is very effective at preventing TB in children and younger adults), but a balance-of-risks decision based on the low general prevalence of childhood TB, versus the diagnostic usefulness of tuberculin testing for TB in an unvaccinated population. The UK has much the same approach, but I didn't know that the USA had avoided vaccination even while carrying out mass screening. If the disease was common enough to make it worth screening for, why wasn't it worth vaccinating against?
    So far I haven't been able to find a decision tree dating from those days, setting out the risk/benefit calculation used in the USA.

    ETA: As we've all learned during the Current Unpleasantness, it's very common for countries to differ on their risk/benefit assessments of medical treatments--UK doctors are often surprised at what US doctors can and can't prescribe, and I'm sure that situation is precisely mirrored. So no criticism of the US screening programme in the 1960s is intended. I'm just curious to see the rationale for adopting that specific approach.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Jul-19 at 10:27 PM.
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  13. #5053
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,826
    I don't recall being given a TB test as a kid and I am unable to find any on-line evidence that it was a standard monitoring test in Australia in those days. But what I vaguely remembered and now have looked up was mass x-ray checks. In the 1950's/60's all adults in Australia were required to have compulsory x-ray checks called "Mass miniature radiological chest screening" for evidence of TB. Not only was it compulsory but there were significant fines for refusal. But there were also carrots. If you were diagnosed with TB, treatment with the antibiotics introduced after WW2 was free, and still is, and you were paid a special "Tuberculosis Allowance" to ensure that you could afford to be treated properly without having to go to work.

    The testing was conducted by special caravans of equipment that visited all towns and suburbs on a rotating basis. The images were not recorded on x-ray plates but on reels of 70mm 'Movie Film' which could be recorded and viewed very rapidly with special equipment. This system was initially designed to use 35 mm film but during WW2 the special cameras etc were imported from the USA and when unpacked they were found to be 70mm cameras rather than the ordered 35mm ones. Because of the huge problem of shipping non-military items across the Pacific in the middle of the war there was no realistic prospect of the correct size cameras arriving. Therefore the use 70mm film became the standard. Overall the rate of TB in Australia "dropped dramatically during the 20th century, from 108.5 per 100,000 population in 1907 to 0.3 per 100,000 population in 2000."

    As an aside the arrival of large numbers of US troops in Australia during that period also had a positive effect on the rate of TB here. The US Govt. wanted to buy significant quantities of milk products for its troops but one of the conditions were that the cattle herds had to be free of TB. The various State Govts. here had been lax in TB control in cattle previously and this was a big incentive for proper measures to be introduced. Combined with even more extensive work in the 1970's this has resulted in bovine TB being completely eradicated here in 1997.

    https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/about-us/re...trol-australia

    https://royalsoc.org.au/images/pdf/j.../136_Tyler.pdf

  14. #5054
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,521
    Quote Originally Posted by Gigabyte View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    I received my initial vaccinations in basic training this way.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Jetgun vaccination - 3704 Flt 511 May 1987.jpg 
Views:	122 
Size:	267.1 KB 
ID:	26324

    That's not me, by the way. This photo was taken in 1987. I underwent training in 1978 and at that time, they had us link arms and go through the line in pairs so one could catch the other in case of fainting.
    Same here, in 1971. And holy cow, I just realized I'm approximately at the 50th anniversary of my graduation from Basic! No linking of arms for us; I have a vague recollection of getting jet injections in both arms simultaneously, which is pretty much what's in the picture.
    They did warn us that if we thought we might faint to tell them so we could get it sitting down. But of course nobody did and one guy went through the rest of Basic with a pattern of scabs on the back of his head where he'd gone straight over backward onto the rocks that are universal at Ft. Lewis.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  15. #5055
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    16,471
    Asking people if they think they might faint isn't very useful anyway. You just don't know. I've had tons of vaccinations, not a single problem. Except one where 5 minutes after the fact I ever so nearly fainted. I went to the point where I still had sight but had lost hearing, which in my experience is knocking on fainting's door. And I have only truly fainted once in my entire life (due to illness) so it's not like I'm prone to ragdoll or anything. For our COVID vaccinations, everyone gets the injection while sitting down and has to stay on a chair in a waiting room for 15 minutes afterwards so (allergic) reactions can be taken care of.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  16. #5056
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,576
    Interesting. I donít know if I ever fainted. The only time I remember being out of it for a short time is after I had a bad fall down stairs. I donít remember all of the fall and immediately after I had a few seconds where my vision seemed gray and it seemed hard to speak, then it resolved. Would that count as fainting or as more of a trauma induced effect? I later learned I had fractured five ribs. Later, I didnít have any physical problems other than dealing with my very painful ribs (no concussion or anything).

    So far, Iíve never had any issues with shots or blood draws. Iím certainly used to them. When I was five, I had a bad bacterial lung infection and for a fair amount of time was getting weekly blood tests, so they have no emotional impact on me.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  17. #5057
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    17,521
    My best friend from next door passed out at all the polio vaccinations in the mid-1950's. Vaccinations never bothered me. I did, however, lose consciousness after falling off the roof in 2012 and nearly did so a couple times due to locking my knees in various situations.
    And of course, there's night-time. We play music while we're sleeping. Sometimes I wake up and think "hey, there's my favorite song!" and next time I wake up I think "Nuts, I fell asleep in that song AGAIN!" Which is, of course, pretty much the purpose of the music.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  18. #5058
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    32,049
    My older sister passed out while giving blood at a Halloween blood drive when we were in high school. She was dressed as a vampire. I tell this story every chance I get; she probably wishes I wouldn't.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  19. #5059
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,857
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    My older sister passed out while giving blood at a Halloween blood drive when we were in high school. She was dressed as a vampire. I tell this story every chance I get; she probably wishes I wouldn't.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  20. #5060
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,763
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    My older sister passed out while giving blood at a Halloween blood drive when we were in high school. She was dressed as a vampire. I tell this story every chance I get; she probably wishes I wouldn't.
    Duh! Vampires donít give blood, they take it.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  21. #5061
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,576
    I just heard another power flex alert was going into place this afternoon here in California. Thatís where they ask people to turn up the thermostat and turn off or delay using other appliances that have high power demand. The background is that we are getting a lot of these alerts this year, the risk is they might have to start rolling blackouts if they canít meet demand.

    I read an article about a week ago that said flex alerts used to get a good response but not so anymore. Of course, the reason is obvious: They used to be rare and only requested when something really exceptional happened, like a fire cutting off high voltage power lines. Now they are a matter of course. It shows poor planning - clearly they need more generation capacity, and in the short term if they want people to use less power they should give them discounts if they use less power when requested.

    So now Iím wondering how long it will take them to fix the issue properly, or if they will fix it properly at all.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  22. #5062
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North Tonawanda, NY
    Posts
    3,998
    Long enough that the state will need to be pretty much evacuated because of lack of water before then.

  23. #5063
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    20,576
    Hah. Evacuation? Wonít happen. Most of the water goes to agriculture anyway, so what could happen is a shift to less and fewer thirsty crops. There also has been off and on talk of desalination plants for some coastal cities. The problem is that they cost a lot to run and rainfall in California tends to be too much or too little. Weíll have a few dry years followed by a year with heavy rain, and we have a lot of storage, so desalination would only start to make sense if we stop having enough of the wet years.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." ó Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  24. #5064
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Posts
    99
    Imagine how many power flex alerts will be issued when everyone is plugging in a car.

  25. #5065
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,763
    Quote Originally Posted by Ely View Post
    Imagine how many power flex alerts will be issued when everyone is plugging in a car.
    Iíve heard proposals to use electric cars to subsidize grid power under extreme load conditions.
    However, my recent experiences with humanity indicate that people would not go along with such a plan.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  26. #5066
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Posts
    99
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I’ve heard proposals to use electric cars to subsidize grid power under extreme load conditions.
    However, my recent experiences with humanity indicate that people would not go along with such a plan.
    That would be a foolish endeavor. There Is a certain amount of entropy when charging and or discharging a battery.

  27. #5067
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    No longer near Grover's Mill
    Posts
    5,763
    Quote Originally Posted by Ely View Post
    That would be a foolish endeavor. There Is a certain amount of entropy when charging and or discharging a battery.
    I think the idea is that the car charges overnight, when demand is relatively low. The next day, it could return some energy to the grid during peak demand.

    I donít know how workable such a plan would be. Certainly, there would be losses.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  28. #5068
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    21,218
    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    I think the idea is that the car charges overnight, when demand is relatively low. The next day, it could return some energy to the grid during peak demand.

    I don’t know how workable such a plan would be. Certainly, there would be losses.
    It's a way of buffering the inevitable fluctuation in energy production from renewables, which generally need battery storage in the grid anyway. There's also the potential for using the car battery as part of a microgeneration scheme. It's a thing.

    Grant Hutchison
    Science Denier and Government Sponsored Propagandist. Here to help.
    Blog

  29. #5069
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    10,116
    Indeed the recently announced Ford truck, with its one ton battery, not only powers tools but can run a house for a day or two. The use of electric vehicles to buffer renewables is rather a good idea IMO. The losses are not so important if the input energy is solar and wind. This idea has prompted several ingenious local wind schemes for charging cars such as turbines on lampposts and rooftops.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  30. #5070
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    North Tonawanda, NY
    Posts
    3,998
    The problem is that peak daily heating and cooling times pretty well coincide with the two "rush hours". You can't use cars to run the buildings' air conditioners if the cars are still on the road on their way home.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •