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Thread: Stuff you just don't get.

  1. #4771
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    This is amusing but timely (I’m only mentioning it in this thread because it fits with the topic of recent posts): Musk announced that Tesla is working on a general purpose humanoid robot. I wish them luck, but this gets into extremely ambitious territory even if the timeframe is measured in decades. Article here:

    https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021...humanoid-form/

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  2. #4772
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    I don't get this:
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    A recently observed trend. Take your dog to the top of a hill with a view indicator. Lift your dog on to the view indicator. Take the dog's photograph. Lift the dog off again.
    I presume there's some sort of social media meme in operation.

    Grant Hutchison
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  3. #4773
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    View indicator?
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  4. #4774
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    View indicator?
    No idea what you'd call them in the USA, I'm afraid. A horizontal metal plate with a circular sketch of labelled horizon features engraved around its edge, often also marked up with radiating lines showing distance and bearing. Usually mounted on a low pillar, like the ones seen in the photograph, and generally set up on the summits of "tourist hills". Sometimes also called "orientation tables". You can find a more detailed photograph and description of the one in my first photograph here.

    Grant Hutchison
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  5. #4775
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    Got it, thanks.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  6. #4776
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I don't get this:
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    A recently observed trend. Take your dog to the top of a hill with a view indicator. Lift your dog on to the view indicator. Take the dog's photograph. Lift the dog off again.
    I presume there's some sort of social media meme in operation.

    Grant Hutchison
    My first thought was "Placing Your Dog on a Pedestal", as in giving praise and homage to your dog, treating them with special attention, or idolatry. But since the columns all have view indicators in common, that idea fizzled.

    I noticed that the photos involved two photographers; one to image the dog and one to image the scene. But I don't think the dogs are that narcissistic.

  7. #4777
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    Makes me think of the weird photos of a whole crowd of people doing odd poses; because they are all doing their own version of the "I am holding up the leaning tower of Pisa" photo.
    Measure once, cut twice. Practice makes perfect.

  8. #4778
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    I've never before heard of a view indicator.

  9. #4779
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Is that really what you meant to say?
    Sorry, that was a typo. I meant “men.” If I ever caught myself doing that I’d shoot myself.


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  10. #4780
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    My first thought was "Placing Your Dog on a Pedestal", as in giving praise and homage to your dog, treating them with special attention, or idolatry. But since the columns all have view indicators in common, that idea fizzled.

    I noticed that the photos involved two photographers; one to image the dog and one to image the scene. But I don't think the dogs are that narcissistic.
    Well, I'm the second photographer. I'm not necessary to the process. I just happen to observe it happening. And I guess it could occur using some other flat-topped object--there just aren't many other flat-topped objects on hilltops that can accommodate an average dog.

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  11. #4781
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    My first thought was "Placing Your Dog on a Pedestal", as in giving praise and homage to your dog, treating them with special attention, or idolatry. But since the columns all have view indicators in common, that idea fizzled.

    I noticed that the photos involved two photographers; one to image the dog and one to image the scene. But I don't think the dogs are that narcissistic.
    It seems the photos taken by the subjects are not angled well to identify the location. Otherwise dogs could replace well travelled gnomes. Maybe the background view is evidence enough?
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  12. #4782
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    We've been watching the Vuelta a Espana, and they have a limited number of commercials that get shown over and over. One of them is for Alpecin Caffeine Shampoo. What's it supposed to do, wake up your hair?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #4783
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    We've been watching the Vuelta a Espana, and they have a limited number of commercials that get shown over and over. One of them is for Alpecin Caffeine Shampoo. What's it supposed to do, wake up your hair?

    At least it is better than shampoo flavored coffee.
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  14. #4784
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post

    At least it is better than shampoo flavored coffee.
    Percolate, rinse, repeat.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  15. #4785
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    “Perk up your hair!”
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  16. #4786
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    We've been watching the Vuelta a Espana, and they have a limited number of commercials that get shown over and over. One of them is for Alpecin Caffeine Shampoo. What's it supposed to do, wake up your hair?
    Promote hair growth.
    Results: Caffeine enhanced hair shaft elongation, prolonged anagen duration and stimulated hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation. Female HFs showed higher sensitivity to caffeine than male HFs. Caffeine counteracted testosterone-enhanced TGF-β2 protein expression in male HFs. In female HFs, testosterone failed to induce TGF-β2 expression, while caffeine reduced it. In male and female HFs, caffeine enhanced IGF-1 protein expression. In ORSKs, caffeine stimulated cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis/necrosis, and upregulated IGF-1 gene expression and protein secretion, while TGF-β2 protein secretion was downregulated.
    Conclusions: This study reveals new growth-promoting effects of caffeine on human hair follicles in subjects of both sexes at different levels (molecular, cellular and organ).
    However, though caffeine works in the lab, so far there's little evidence of an effect from caffeine shampoos. In the UK, the Advertising Standards Authority has banned the manufacturers of Alpecin from claiming it "can actually help to reduce hair loss".

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  17. #4787
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delvo View Post
    I've never before heard of a view indicator.
    So are these objects unknown in the USA? Or are they just called by a different name?
    I'd never heard of "orientation table" until I had a bit of search around for alternative names. I think its meaning is even more opaque than "view indicator" in English--it seems to be just a literal translation of the French table d'orientation. I'm also seeing "toposcope", which I've also never heard used. The Oxford English Dictionary supports its use with citations going back a century, but Merriam-Webster denies it existence.

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  18. #4788
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    So are these objects unknown in the USA? Or are they just called by a different name?
    I'd never heard of "orientation table" until I had a bit of search around for alternative names. I think its meaning is even more opaque than "view indicator" in English--it seems to be just a literal translation of the French table d'orientation. I'm also seeing "toposcope", which I've also never heard used. The Oxford English Dictionary supports its use with citations going back a century, but Merriam-Webster denies it existence.

    Grant Hutchison
    I don't recall seeing something exactly like that in the USA, particularly a horizontal object, with a full 360 degree perspective, but that might be my lack of experience (though I have visited scenic overlooks at elevation).

    More commonly in the US will be a more vertically oriented (or angled) sign, covering maybe 120 degrees of the view, explaining the features that can be seen. I don't know of a specific name for such a sign, nor could a google up a good example image of one. The image below was the closest I could come up with.

    Photo link
    Last edited by Swift; 2021-Aug-28 at 04:07 PM.
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  19. #4789
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I don't recall seeing something exactly like that in the USA, particularly a horizontal object, with a full 360 degree perspective, but that might be my lack of experience (though I have visited scenic overlooks at elevation).

    More commonly in the US will be a more vertically oriented (or angled) sign, covering maybe 120 degrees of the view, explaining the features that can be seen. I don't know of a specific name for such a sign, nor could a google up a good example image of one. The image below was the closest I could come up with.
    I think this is maybe the sort of thing you mean--an example I recall from Resolution Park in Anchorage (particularly memorable because we visited it when visibility was about fifty feet, but it was nice to know what was out there). These are common in the UK, too--here is one I walk past fairly frequently.

    The Ordnance Survey, the national mapping agency in the UK, confusingly designates both these and the horizontal 360-degree versions "viewpoints" in their map keys (with a blue fan indicating the direction and extent of the view described), but in common usage here a viewpoint is just a place with a good view, rather than any sort of physical structure.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Aug-25 at 07:25 PM.
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  20. #4790
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    There's one on the side of this mountain (in the photo gallery). NC, TN, and VA are visible. The name of the leftmost peak seems obscured.

    https://www.stateparks.com/mount_jef..._carolina.html

  21. #4791
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    “Perk up your hair!”
    Pour a cup and lather up.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  22. #4792
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    The type of sign mentioned by Swift and grapes is common here. I don't know the proper name for them.

    The view indicator shown by Grant vaguely reminds me of an alidade. There is a version of these known as an Osborne Fire Finder used in fire lookouts. I've also seen them with a simple azimuth base instead of the topo map. In one fire lookout I visited, there was also a 360 degree panorama photo that had the true bearings in fine gradations marked on it - a backup to the alidade.

  23. #4793
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    Many of these indicators are erected as memorials, on favourite hills of the person commemorated. But a local one that's frequently described as a memorial was actually unveiled in the presence of the person it honours (though it now does serve as a memorial).
    Syd Scroggie was left blind and one-legged after stepping on a landmine, but nevertheless continued hillwalking well into his old age. (I was privileged to encounter him on the hill, once.)
    His view indicator is an unusually simple one, showing only azimuths and with no attempt to depict the scenery ... which seems appropriate for a view indicator dedicated to a blind man. The central inscription reads, in part:
    He gae'd his ain gait a' his life but whiles wi' ithers' een
    (He went his own way all his life, but for a while with others' eyes.)
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    It's a reference to the fact that he relied on sighted companions, though not as much as you might think--when I met him he was scuttling down a boulder-field on all fours, and he gave me a vivid description of the surrounding scenery while pointing in the appropriate directions.

    Anyway, I'm sure old Syd would have had something amused and pithy to say about having a dog's bottom resting on his name.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Aug-25 at 09:08 PM.
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  24. #4794
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I think this is maybe the sort of thing you mean--an example I recall from Resolution Park in Anchorage (particularly memorable because we visited it when visibility was about fifty feet, but it was nice to know what was out there). These are common in the UK, too--here is one I walk past fairly frequently.

    The Ordnance Survey, the national mapping agency in the UK, confusingly designates both these and the horizontal 360-degree versions "viewpoints" in their map keys (with a blue fan indicating the direction and extent of the view described), but in common usage here a viewpoint is just a place with a good view, rather than any sort of physical structure.

    Grant Hutchison
    Yes, those are exactly what I was thinking of, and no, I can't think of a specific American English word or phrase to describe them. "View Indicator" would work for me.
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  25. #4795
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Promote hair growth.However, though caffeine works in the lab, so far there's little evidence of an effect from caffeine shampoos. In the UK, the Advertising Standards Authority has banned the manufacturers of Alpecin from claiming it "can actually help to reduce hair loss".

    Grant Hutchison
    For me, that ship sailed about 50 years ago anyhow.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  26. #4796
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I think this is maybe the sort of thing you mean--an example I recall from Resolution Park in Anchorage (particularly memorable because we visited it when visibility was about fifty feet, but it was nice to know what was out there). These are common in the UK, too--here is one I walk past fairly frequently.
    I was just about to post about Resolution Park when I read your post. Here's another link that may provide a slightly better view of the signage.
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  27. #4797
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift (my bold) View Post
    ... More commonly in the US will be a more vertically oriented (or angled) sign, ...
    This then had me thinking:

    (And yeah, if someone says "Korea" I'll say "Malibu Creek State Park".)
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  28. #4798
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    I recently visited the Guinness brewery in Baltimore. They have a sign similar to the one in M*A*S*H, but pointing to their other breweries worldwide.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  29. 2021-Sep-26, 06:08 AM
    Reason
    Accidental duplication

  30. #4799
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    Netflix has a trailer for the live action Cowboy Bebop out, it is just a redone opener with the live action stars and classic Cowboy Bebop music:

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?time_con...ature=emb_logo

    For those that aren’t familiar, Cowboy Bebop is a memorable and popular adult themed science fiction anime with (mostly) adult characters and a story and music that worked well together. It was regularly played on a cable channel that ran anime with English speaking voice actors. I’ve seen it often enough I’m in no hurry to watch it again, although I liked it well enough.

    So the bit I don’t get is: Why a live action version for this show? Live action versions of previously animated shows are almost always disappointing and often so bad as to be unwatchable. Live action also introduces limitations you just don’t have with animation. I think I’ve twice seen live action versions that I didn’t hate, but didn’t hold a candle to the original show.

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  31. #4800
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    A few years ago, I finished paying off a personal loan and saw my credit rating go down as a direct result. That's based on not just timing but the credit-rating source stating it themselves. They said it was because closing that account meant I had less credit available to draw from in the future. So apparently they were treating a personal loan from my credit union (just think "bank" if your country doesn't have those) the same as a credit card even though it doesn't work that way; I couldn't borrow more on the same loan again and there wasn't any way to keep it open to borrow from again once it was paid off. It's more like a house/car loan that way.

    More recently, I bought a new-to-me truck partially with a loan and wondered what would happen with my credit rating when I paid this one off. I thought maybe the credit rating agencies had failed to distinguish between personal loans and credit cards but would at least be able to tell the difference between those and a truck loan. But no, a month after I paid the truck off (why the delay?), my rating went down 12 points.

    My supposition for now is that this is because it's judging not how good I am at using credit for my own benefit, but how profitable it is for lenders to lend to me. Their profit would come from interest and late-payment fees. I not only never had the latter but also reduced the former by paying these loans off ahead of schedule, so my decreased credit score both times is a warning to lenders that I'm unlikely to be shoveling much extra money at them for future loans.

    At least, that's what I'm inferring for now.

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