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Thread: Stuff you just don't get.

  1. #4411
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    And I would never insist it's something you should dislike. Isn't that the point of the "just don't get" thread? Otherwise it would be the "stuff no-one in their right minds could possibly enjoy" thread.

    Grant Hutchison
    So far the only regular food I cannot enjoy is tripe. I did persevere with expert versions, but no, I will not seek it. In France I did try to offer UK Christmas pudding and mince pies, no one would even try them! But spicy pork sausages are popular. Of course illegal to import them now. Locally , when there were restaurants, a sausage called AAAA was on the menu, so I tried it and disliked it. One of those As turns out to be tripe. I should have checked.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  2. #4412
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    So far the only regular food I cannot enjoy is tripe.
    I have to say you are a much more open-minded person than me. There are dozens if not hundreds of regular foods that I cannot enjoy.

    Oysters, Brussels sprouts, anchovies, nampla, okra, eggplants, liver, tripe, pig feet, broccoli, cauliflower, tomalley... I could go on.


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  3. #4413
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    So far the only regular food I cannot enjoy is tripe.
    I'll contentedly eat anything. My relationship with food spans a fairly small gamut from "pointless" to "interesting", with most foodstuffs clustering in the "it's fine" zone. Tripe is at the "interesting" end, because if I saw it as a menu option it would go on the "to consider" list rather than the "see if there's anything more interesting" list. But if offered anything on my "pointless" list at some sort of social dining event (remember those?) I'll cheerfully accept it.
    (Snacks I tend to eschew just because they're snacks, rather than for any particular feeling about their taste or mouthfeel. So popcorn takes a double hit, being a snack food without appeal for me.)

    Grant Hutchison

  4. #4414
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I have to say you are a much more open-minded person than me. There are dozens if not hundreds of regular foods that I cannot enjoy.

    Oysters, Brussels sprouts, anchovies, nampla, okra, eggplants, liver, tripe, pig feet, broccoli, cauliflower, tomalley... I could go on.


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    Yes to all except tripe, I guess I am a dog.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  5. #4415
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I'll contentedly eat anything. My relationship with food spans a fairly small gamut from "pointless" to "interesting", with most foodstuffs clustering in the "it's fine" zone. Tripe is at the "interesting" end, because if I saw it as a menu option it would go on the "to consider" list rather than the "see if there's anything more interesting" list. But if offered anything on my "pointless" list at some sort of social dining event (remember those?) I'll cheerfully accept it.
    (Snacks I tend to eschew just because they're snacks, rather than for any particular feeling about their taste or mouthfeel.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Yes having said anything, I still go for rather plain fare, and do not miss the excess starches I used to eat. Actually Haggis and the kind of English equivalent, faggots, plus black pudding are mouthwatering, along with cheddar cheese that burns the mouth with raw onions. But in restaurants, IIRC, it is a chance to try new things. Some memorable others just as experiments. Many of those are very hard to find in the USA and now cheddar has disappeared from France altogether.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  6. #4416
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Oysters, Brussels sprouts, anchovies, nampla, okra, eggplants, liver, tripe, pig feet, broccoli, cauliflower, tomalley... I could go on.
    All of these would fall into my "interesting" category with the exception of eggplant, which I find a bit dull, and a good way to undermine the mouthfeel of a perfectly good curry.
    In fact, in a couple of hours I'm going to roast some Brussels sprouts with balsamic vinegar, red pepper and parmesan, to add a bit of interest to dinner tonight.

    Grant Hutchison

  7. #4417
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Mention of popcorn on another thread reminds me that I don't get popcorn. It's just a tasteless vehicle for butter and salt, with the mouthfeel of expanded polystyrene.
    Grant, Iíve said this before, but while I like you, I feel like we donít like ANY of the same foods.
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  8. #4418
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Grant, I’ve said this before, but while I like you, I feel like we don’t like ANY of the same foods.
    So nothing on Jens's List of Shame appeals to you, either? It's so varied it seems like most people would be able to enjoy at least one or two items from it.

    Grant Hutchison

  9. #4419
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    Avocados. They just taste green.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #4420
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Avocados. They just taste green.
    For a while (as with eggplant/aubergine/brinjal) I used to try various ways of serving avocado to see if it might have some hidden depth I was failing to recognize. But no--it has stayed firmly in the "pointless" category for me. And now that we all know that it is also Destroying The Planet, I've given up even trying.

    Grant Hutchison

  11. #4421
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    [...]There are dozens if not hundreds of regular foods that I cannot enjoy.

    Oysters, Brussels sprouts, anchovies, nampla, okra, eggplants, liver, tripe, pig feet, broccoli, cauliflower, tomalley... I could go on.
    Oysters: oh, yes please...especially if they're from Kachemak Bay.
    Okra: in gumbo, yes. Fried, no.
    Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and cauliflower: yes, yes, and yes.

    While (unlike Grant) I don't happily eat just anything, I will try almost anything and often, more than once at that. Asparagus is a good example. I want to like it. It looks good and I do like my veggies. I've been able to eat it on a handful of occasions and even enjoyed it a couple of times but otherwise, the taste is still unpleasant to me. I'll keep trying, though.

    My wife dearly loves beets. I certainly do not in spite of multiple attempts. The same goes for raspberries, which irks me a bit because I like/adore other members of Rubus such as marionberries, loganberries, and blackberries. (Cobbler!)
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  12. #4422
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Oysters, Brussels sprouts, anchovies, nampla, okra, eggplants, liver, tripe, pig feet, broccoli, cauliflower, tomalley... I could go on.
    Dislike, used to hate before they bred a better-tasting variety in the past twenty years (yes, really) now I like them, don’t eat them enough to have an opinion, never had it, never had it, like, don’t eat often enough to have an opinion, never had it, never had it, like it, like it, I don’t even know what that is.
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  13. #4423
    Never had Okra, tried to grow to find it, it didn't work.
    Never oysters never had them, don't want to.
    The only thing I won't eat i
    s eggs, bad memories.
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  14. #4424
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    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Dislike, used to hate before they bred a better-tasting variety in the past twenty years (yes, really) now I like them, don’t eat them enough to have an opinion, never had it, never had it, like, don’t eat often enough to have an opinion, never had it, never had it, like it, like it, I don’t even know what that is.
    So, it appears we do have some overlap among the Brassica. Kale? Cabbage? Kohlrabi? Romanesco? All interesting things to cook with, for me.
    Tomalley is the combined liver/pancreas of a lobster. These days it's usually removed before the lobster is served, because it's essentially a little concentrating organ for anything nasty in seawater--if your chef knows their business, you'll just get a little dose of PCB or mercury; but carelessly sourced, it brings you paralytic shellfish poisoning.

    Grant Hutchison

  15. #4425
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backroad Astronomer View Post
    Never had Okra, tried to grow to find it, it didn't work.
    Never oysters never had them, don't want to.
    The only thing I won't eat i
    s eggs, bad memories.
    Eggs! This reminds me of my mother. As a schoolgirl she went to france and ate mayonaise at a station near Paris, this would be about 1935. (That is a year not a time) (although it could have been both I suppose) it was bad and she had a miserable 24 hours. Never ate an egg again! Would not touch anything with an egg in it. I cannot say I admired that trait in her. But she cooked with eggs so I was all right. I had a very bad experience with Whisky , it was a stag night. It took me years of perseverance to get over that, but I did.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  16. #4426
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    I'll try almost anything, and I enjoy a wide range of things, but I'm a connoisseur of nothing. I often forget all details of meals that I remember having really enjoyed. Weird, I know.

  17. #4427
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Mention of popcorn on another thread reminds me that I don't get popcorn. It's just a tasteless vehicle for butter and salt, with the mouthfeel of expanded polystyrene. And the customary portions are outlandishly huge--the mere sight of one of those ludicrous buckets gives me reactive anorexia.
    Back in the day, I went to see The Changeling in Thunder Bay with a couple of Canadian women, who ordered up a bucket of popcorn the size of Switzerland, despite my protestations that I wasn't going to eat any. My main memory of that movie is of a damp ball bouncing down a flight of stairs, and the sound of continuous shovelling and crunching of popcorn.

    Grant Hutchison
    Completely agree, was never a fan of it, even as a kid. I do like caramel corn (popcorn coated with caramel), but mostly as a vehicle for caramel.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I have to say you are a much more open-minded person than me. There are dozens if not hundreds of regular foods that I cannot enjoy.

    Oysters, Brussels sprouts, anchovies, nampla, okra, eggplants, liver, tripe, pig feet, broccoli, cauliflower, tomalley... I could go on.


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    Oysters - love
    Brussels sprouts - do not like, I think its the smell
    anchovies - love, but in small doses
    nampla - didn't know what this was (googled - fish sauce - oh, I've used it in cooking)
    okra - like in certain dishes, like gumbo, but just "ok" on its own
    eggplants - love
    liver - like, both beef and chicken; my Aunt Rose made great chopped liver
    tripe - have never had; I might be willing, but not seeking
    pig feet - have never had and it doesn't appeal to me
    broccoli - love
    cauliflower - OK, very dependent upon how it is made and served (ranges from blah to very good)
    tomalley - not a clue what it is (googled - green lobster organ - haven't eaten it)

    I'll throw out another one - cow tongue - love it, one of my favorites. I particularly like it boiled, as Eastern European Jews usually make, but I've also had it smoked, which is good)
    Last edited by Swift; 2021-Mar-22 at 06:35 PM.
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  18. #4428
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    Oysters - yes ... fried, cooked or halfshell
    Brussels sprouts - yes
    anchovies - yes (Favorite pizza is "dead fish and fungus)
    nampla - may have had it in a dish or two, don't really know
    okra - yes ... fried, in gumbo, in stew
    eggplants - yes ... fried or Parmigiana
    liver - yes ... beef, chicken, or liverwurst
    tripe - I don't think so
    pig feet - I really don't think so
    broccoli - yes
    cauliflower - yes
    tomalley - never heard of it, doesn't sound too appetizing

    Saw a thing online, "Lies We Tell Our Children," where a mother wrote that her kids hate Brussels sprouts but love baby cabbages.
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  19. #4429
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I'll throw out another one - cow tongue - love it, one of my favorites.
    That was a regular in our house when I was a kid, until my mother found out that "tongue" meant tongue. Which was my fault, because I had pointed out the beautiful way the muscle fibres run in three directions through the body of the tongue.
    "But it's not ... something's tongue?" said my mother, with the obvious answer evidently hitting her midsentence.
    And that was the last time we had tongue in our house.

    The family joke thereafter was that my mother wasn't prepared to eat something that had come out of cow's mouth, but was very happy with her two eggs for breakfast every morning.

    Grant Hutchison

  20. #4430
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    In those days when such things happened, a small group of school alumni met once a year to eat, basically and drink. Friday night was tongue and pork pie with egg inside. The interruption probably means the cycle is broken, “Never More” . The group was dwindling from death and dementia anyway. But the internet has allowed a subgroup. But no tongue, yet.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  21. #4431
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    The family joke thereafter was that my mother wasn't prepared to eat something that had come out of cow's mouth, but was very happy with her two eggs for breakfast every morning.
    I've long been amused by some of the 'okay/not okay' rationalizations we make along these lines. For example, I'm all in for eggs, be they scrambled, fried, soft/hard boiled, poached, etc. I'm also fond of fowl...many kinds, many ways. But I think I would find it challenging to try Balut*. I like to think that offered the chance, I would overcome that hurdle but I just don't know for sure.

    *Warning: some folks may be disturbed by some of the images at the linked page.
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  22. #4432
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    But I think I would find it challenging to try Balut*.
    Ah, I see.

    I was not sure why you’d have issues with a dice game.
    So . . . does this look as bad as it looks?

  23. #4433
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    Just a clarification regarding "tomalley", it's not a word I knew either, and I might have mistranslated. What I meant was something in Japanese called kanimiso (カニみそ). Basically it's what's inside a crab's shell. So generally when Japanese eat any kind of crab, they eat the meat in the legs and stuff, but they also open the shell and put in soy sauce and eat those orange things (lungs or something?) inside the shell. And generally find it to be the best part. To me it has that kind of fishy livery oystery taste that I really don't like... The same goes with sea urchin gonads (うに). I think that tomalley is probably basically equivalent, but from lobsters.

    If you go to the Japanese Wikipedia page for kanimiso (https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%82...83%9F%E3%82%BD) it links in English to tomalley, which is why I used it.
    As above, so below

  24. #4434
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Just a clarification regarding "tomalley", it's not a word I knew either, and I might have mistranslated. What I meant was something in Japanese called kanimiso (カニみそ). Basically it's what's inside a crab's shell. So generally when Japanese eat any kind of crab, they eat the meat in the legs and stuff, but they also open the shell and put in soy sauce and eat those orange things (lungs or something?) inside the shell.
    Well, crabs don't have lungs, they have gills. I think what you're describing is the same organ as tomalley in lobsters--the hepatopancreas--which I've seen called "crab fat" because of its colour.
    I'm not aware of having eaten that, but suspect I have. My father used to occasionally come home with a couple of large live crabs in a bucket, and some sort of secret carnage would occur in the kitchen, and then we'd have crab salad in the evening, which (in memory at least) involved a wider range of bits and pieces than one normally encounters in a British restaurant.

    Grant Hutchison

  25. #4435
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    Ok for me -:

    Oysters - fine but I prefer them raw with a bit of Lemon
    Brussels Sprouts - lovely as long as they have not been boiled to a mush. Good in Stir Fries.
    Anchovies - not a big fan but ok if used as in moderation.
    Nampla - ok if used in proper context.
    Okra (Ladies Fingers) - I like them especially if cooked as a Stir Fry or made into a Sambal.
    Eggplants - ok cooked well but nicer in a Brinjal Pickle.
    Liver, tripe , brains etc - not for me I am afraid.
    Any part of Lobster, Crayfish or Crab - a big no. It will occasionally make my tongue 'tingle' a bit so i suspect that I might have a slight allergy to them. But I don't like the taste anyway.
    Broccoli - lovely
    Cauliflower - also lovely
    Pigs feet - if roasted I don't see why not but I can't recall having it.

    A couple of others -

    Chicken Feet - I have had them a few times. Pretty unobjectionable but also a waste of time. Just seem to be very boney with little flesh. It is the sauce that tastes ok.
    Durian - one of the most divisive fruits. I can eat it eat but am not that fond of the super sweet yet sickly taste. My wife and daughter would be sick if they tried it yet my son adores the taste. The smell that "has been described variously as rotten onions, turpentine, and raw sewage"is a big determinate if you will eat it.
    Avocado - A bit bland but lovely with fresh ham off the bone. I don't eat it as avocado toast.

  26. #4436
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Durian - one of the most divisive fruits. I can eat it eat but am not that fond of the super sweet yet sickly taste. My wife and daughter would be sick if they tried it yet my son adores the taste. The smell that "has been described variously as rotten onions, turpentine, and raw sewage"is a big determinate if you will eat it.
    Yeah, durians are definitely divisive. I kind of like them, but they do smell a bit like, turpentine is probably a good way to say it. Most people seem to really reject it though.

    And actually, another divisive one: I like licorice, but in Japan, people almost inevitably find it revolting. People sometimes accuse it of being rubber tires.
    As above, so below

  27. #4437
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Yeah, durians are definitely divisive. I kind of like them, but they do smell a bit like, turpentine is probably a good way to say it. Most people seem to really reject it though.

    And actually, another divisive one: I like licorice, but in Japan, people almost inevitably find it revolting. People sometimes accuse it of being rubber tires.
    Licorice or liquorice used to available in sweet shops as twig like root to chew. Not so long ago it was in most patent medicines for its black colour and many claimed benefits. They sugar it too much now but I used to buy boxes of hard liquorice pipes from Denmark.
    I did try Durians and they are super sweet but many good foods have bad smells. Cheeses for example. They do not taste the way they pong. Other foods have blocks from disgust , I guess, like brains and offal. But they taste good and are nutritious. I heard you should avoid the liver of carnivores, too much vitamin A, but not often on a menu. That tip was in a survival handbook so does not count as normal eating.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  28. #4438
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    I heard you should avoid the liver of carnivores, too much vitamin A, but not often on a menu. That tip was in a survival handbook so does not count as normal eating.
    Yes, not good for you. Douglas Mawson, in his famous lone survival trek in Antarctica, was unaware of this. He killed his sled-dogs as they became unable to pull, and fed them to the other dogs and himself. He mistakenly kept the livers for himself, as the "most nutritious" cut, and developed hypervitaminosis A. This manifested itself, when he still had hundreds of miles to travel, when he took his socks off for the first time in weeks, and the soles of his feet came off. He wrote in his diary (I may not be recalling the words exactly) "My disappointment at this turn of events may well be imagined."

    Grant Hutchison

  29. #4439
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Yes, not good for you. Douglas Mawson, in his famous lone survival trek in Antarctica, was unaware of this. He killed his sled-dogs as they became unable to pull, and fed them to the other dogs and himself. He mistakenly kept the livers for himself, as the "most nutritious" cut, and developed hypervitaminosis A. This manifested itself, when he still had hundreds of miles to travel, when he took his socks off for the first time in weeks, and the soles of his feet came off. He wrote in his diary (I may not be recalling the words exactly) "My disappointment at this turn of events may well be imagined."

    Grant Hutchison
    And as you are probably aware, it is also thought that it very likely the Vitamin A excess was a major contributor to the death of his last companion on that trip. As an aside, Mawson's image was on the Australian $100 note from 1984 - 1996 - when it was changed from a paper note to a polymer one.

  30. #4440
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    Partly inspired by this thread, I watched a video yesterday of an Asian-American woman eating canned haggis. She loved it. I then looked for it on Amazon. You can actually buy a whole frozen one, not that I'm going to do that. Then I searched for "Scottish Foods" and about 10% of the results were for American pet foods. I'm not getting that one!
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