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Thread: Stuff you just don't get.

  1. #4441
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    And as you are probably aware, it is also thought that it very likely the Vitamin A excess was a major contributor to the death of his last companion on that trip. As an aside, Mawson's image was on the Australian $100 note from 1984 - 1996 - when it was changed from a paper note to a polymer one.
    I recall the survival book tip was prompted by that experience and the subsequent taboo about eating your dogs or other animals on such expeditions but it is only the liver that should be avoided.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  2. #4442
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    And actually, another divisive one: I like licorice, but in Japan, people almost inevitably find it revolting. People sometimes accuse it of being rubber tires.
    I wouldnít call it revolting, but I donít like it at all and suspect if I hadnít encountered it a number of times despite my preferences, I would. I never buy black licorice and probably havenít eaten it since I was a kid, but occasionally have encountered licorice flavor jelly beans, so I am somewhat acclimated to the flavor. One qualification: I have never encountered real unsweetened licorice, and without the sweetness to soften the flavor I suspect I would find it truly revolting.

    I saw a video on a disgusting food museum in Europe and was surprised that root beer and pop tarts were there. I donít often drink root beer but a root beer float with vanilla ice cream is a nice summer treat. I will say that the brand makes a big difference - A&W has too strong a spearmint flavor for me to enjoy drinking it (itís okay for a float though), but there are other really good brands I much prefer.

    And with pop tarts, I donít like them much, and donít buy them, but I wouldnít call them disgusting, just not worth eating.

    For myself, I am quite sensitive to sour and bitter flavors, and certain smells, like those of certain cheeses. Many cheeses taste to me like something that has gone bad. For instance, there are very few salad dressings I will willingly use because they so often taste too sour or smell and taste like something that had sat around far too long. I do find some of those cheese flavors disgusting. Itís annoying because when I eat out there isnít really a safe dressing choice. Italian dressing is usually my best best, but even there, they will often make it too sour or mix in something disgusting. I usually avoid salad in a restaurant for that reason. For home, I eventually found some commercial dressings I like by buying a number of varieties that looked promising and accepting I would have to give or throw away most of them. My success rate was about 1 in 10.

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  3. #4443
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    And actually, another divisive one: I like licorice, but in Japan, people almost inevitably find it revolting. People sometimes accuse it of being rubber tires.
    You mean it isnít?
    So . . . does this look as bad as it looks?

  4. #4444
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    Yum, black licorice jelly beans. It seems that people either love them or hate them.

    As for Root Beer, Iíve had 3 British coworkers over the years, and each hated it. It isnít a comprehensive survey, but I wonder if there is a trend.

    I canít stand green olives. My mother claimed that if a person ate a jar of them, they would acquire a taste for the things, but I never put the claim to the test.
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  5. #4445
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Yum, black licorice jelly beans. It seems that people either love them or hate them.

    As for Root Beer, I’ve had 3 British coworkers over the years, and each hated it. It isn’t a comprehensive survey, but I wonder if there is a trend.

    I can’t stand green olives. My mother claimed that if a person ate a jar of them, they would acquire a taste for the things, but I never put the claim to the test.
    Not a trend, root beer is a good alternative drink. But I do like my tea. In USA that is hard to find, so I drink other stuff but I have found tea houses with excellent tea. I feel sorry for all those people with strong dislikes, I guess I was brought up to eat what I was given so I never developed any notion of choice about food. If I ever did have childhood dislikes I forgot them by the time of getting about and trying everything on offer. I have a daughter who was choosy at around four years but she denies that now. I had some great sandwich experiences, I remember my first venison sandwich when exploring Scotland, and cold lamb or mutton sandwiches, or cold beef, with horseradish made fresh from the garden. My first proper curry, basic pasta with fresh pesto sauce. I don’t think I ever left a plate part eaten! So hearing these dislikes, I feel very lucky to have had a no nonsense start.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  6. #4446
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    I'm sure eating what I was given would have been a big part of my childhood, if I'd ever expressed any reservations about eating anything. As it was, I think there was one show-down in which I was reluctant to eat cod roe (having eaten it happily in the past), and that passed into family legend because by late evening the whole family had food-poisoning. I haven't the slightest recollection of the event, but suspect it was some sort of coincidence rather than a supernatural food-tasting power on my part. Having had actual culture-demonstrated dysentery on more than one occasion, I'm evidently not imbued with the ability to detect microscopic biological contaminants.

    Grant Hutchison

  7. #4447
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post

    As for Root Beer, I’ve had 3 British coworkers over the years, and each hated it. It isn’t a comprehensive survey, but I wonder if there is a trend.
    Maybe they'd have preferred it warm....
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #4448
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    My father was somewhat of a "you'll eat what I put in front of you" kind of guy. Not with an iron fist mind you but then, I don't recall being a particularly picky eater. We did have a few showdowns, though. When it came to my own kids, I didn't want to carry on the same way but I did want to encourage them to be open to new foods...adventurous, even.

    While I get that there's psychology at work, the logical part of my brain just doesn't get a child's argument of "I don't like it!" when they've never tried the food before. Explaining that they can't know if they don't if they've never tried it is almost invariably met with something like "I still don't like it!" So, I bargained most of the time. If they took just one bite and didn't like it, they never had to try it again. I also made a show of trying new foods myself, reveling in things I did like and inexplicably not dying when something tasted bad.

    I estimate that I suffered more defeats than victories but I may have won the war after all. A couple/few years ago, my daughter posted on Facebook that this approach was one of the lessons from her childhood she remembers most fondly and applies it to her own children. Things that make you happy.
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  9. #4449
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    I had a bad time in Brussels with Moules Frites, but since than have enjoyed fresh ones (without frites) straight from the rope in Northern Ireland, and even worse time with rough cider in Bristol, but I survived.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  10. #4450
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Brussels Sprouts - lovely as long as they have not been boiled to a mush. Good in Stir Fries.
    Quote Originally Posted by KaiYeves View Post
    Dislike, used to hate before they bred a better-tasting variety in the past twenty years (yes, really) now I like them[...]
    I grew up eating the Brussels sprouts of the 1960's which my mother practically pressure-cooked into a new state of matter. Yet, I liked them, anyway. I don't quite get that, either. But I like them to this day...just not like that. The Wife had never had them until I introduced her to them, sauteed with bacon and finished with a bit of apple cider vinegar.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Saw a thing online, "Lies We Tell Our Children," where a mother wrote that her kids hate Brussels sprouts but love baby cabbages.
    As my children became more worldly, the reproductive organs of the male cabbage may have been figuratively mentioned. A time or two.
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  11. #4451
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    I have a medical condition where there are foods I dislike to the point of literally throwing up if I try not to eat them. For obvious reasons, this means I can't model "look, I'm trying it, too!" because all too often, a look over the list of ingredients proves, no, I won't like that. Even if I've never had it before. Graham, however, will eat practically anything. What the kids latched onto early as something they don't get is that he doesn't like peanut butter.
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  12. #4452
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    What the kids latched onto early as something they don't get is that he doesn't like peanut butter.
    He must have had a terrible early experience because , as any fule kno, everyone in the world likes peanut butter. I learned that from various Hollywood films and never before had reason to doubt it. Now I may have invited the whirlwind.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    He must have had a terrible early experience because , as any fule kno, everyone in the world likes peanut butter. I learned that from various Hollywood films and never before had reason to doubt it. Now I may have invited the whirlwind.
    I don't get peanut butter, either. It just seems like misapplied ingenuity. But then I'm not big into the general idea of converting perfectly acceptable foodstuffs into homogenized spreadables.

    Grant Hutchison

  14. #4454
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I don't get peanut butter, either. It just seems like misapplied ingenuity. But then I'm not big into the general idea of converting perfectly acceptable foodstuffs into homogenized spreadables.

    Grant Hutchison
    Fair point, although I am not wholly against spreadables. Deshelling peanuts slows down consumption rate and the shells make a flash in the open fire. There is also the unnecessary addition of sugar and salt as preservatives, although useful on long sea crossings like tinned corned beef. Of course a peanut is not a nut, but preshelled nuts are useful too. I did not consider peanut allergies in my comment but that is different from not liking peanuts.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    He must have had a terrible early experience because , as any fule kno, everyone in the world likes peanut butter. I learned that from various Hollywood films and never before had reason to doubt it. Now I may have invited the whirlwind.
    Funny thing is I didn't particularly like peanut butter as a kid, but I really like it as an adult. I don't know why.

    I was generally much more of an "I'll eat anything" than a picky eater when I was a kid, with a few notable exceptions to the anything rule. The one strange eating thing I did was I would have fads - for some period of time I would almost fixate on a particular food. For example, there was one summer that I ate liverwurst sandwiches almost every day for lunch. After that I didn't eat it at all for a couple of years. As an adult it has become something I'll eat once in a while.
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  16. #4456
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Fair point, although I am not wholly against spreadables.
    I'm not wholly against them either. I've just never encountered a foodstuff and thought, Hmmm, what this really needs is to be converted to a paste so that I can spread it on bread.
    It just seems a bit like making baby-food for grown-ups.

    Grant Hutchison

  17. #4457
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I'm not wholly against them either. I've just never encountered a foodstuff and thought, Hmmm, what this really needs is to be converted to a paste so that I can spread it on bread.
    It just seems a bit like making baby-food for grown-ups.

    Grant Hutchison
    That was what was used for originally.
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  18. #4458
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    Yum, black licorice jelly beans. It seems that people either love them or hate them.
    Yeah, I pick them out if I can identify them. But I don’t often eat jellybeans these days. I mostly buy a bag of Jelly Bellies maybe once a year or so when it occurs to me and some of the other flavors have almost the same color.

    As for Root Beer, I’ve had 3 British coworkers over the years, and each hated it. It isn’t a comprehensive survey, but I wonder if there is a trend.
    Some years ago I ran into really tasty brands, and I suspect it would make a difference to many people who don’t like the most easily available brands. There are actually websites that review and rate “gourmet” brands, and there are a surprising number of root bear brands if you look into it. I doubt many are exported, though. Availability is really patchy even in the US.

    I can’t stand green olives. My mother claimed that if a person ate a jar of them, they would acquire a taste for the things, but I never put the claim to the test.
    Ah, yes, that’s another thing I won’t willingly eat, except as a small component in some recipe. I do like black olives well enough in various foods (mostly various Italian dishes). I think for me dislikes focus on various strong flavors usually with a strong bitter or sour component. I’m often fine with them as a component of a recipe, but I usually like them in a much smaller amount than typical, or they will so overwhelm the flavor I won’t be able to taste anything else.

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  19. #4459
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Not a trend, root beer is a good alternative drink. But I do like my tea. In USA that is hard to find, so I drink other stuff but I have found tea houses with excellent tea.
    I’ve come to really like certain teas and brands now that I’ve found them, for instance Taylors Assam variety, also their lighter Afternoon Darjeeling and Ceylon. Similar Twinings varieties are good too. Much better than Liptons or some of the commonly available American brand teas.

    I feel sorry for all those people with strong dislikes, I guess I was brought up to eat what I was given so I never developed any notion of choice about food. If I ever did have childhood dislikes I forgot them by the time of getting about and trying everything on offer.
    I have the impression I notice many flavors much more strongly than many others. I feel sorry for people that seem to barely be able to taste their food. I had some run-ins about food with my parents, but I ate most food. There were just certain things where I wouldn’t budge. I was told many times that my taste would change as I got older, but it never really did. Sure, I found more foods I liked as I found them, but pretty much what I preferred or disliked and why remained the same.

    Some years ago I read an article about grouping of what are called nontasters, tasters and supertasters, based on the number of taste buds. There may also be related differences in the sense of smell. So there seems to be a biological basis for at least part of why some are more picky than others. There is a hypothesis that having the different groups provided a survival advantage in the old days: supertasters are better at identifying dangerous plants and things that have gone bad and would be good for testing food for safety but would be more likely not to eat enough when food was scarce. On the other hand, nontasters had an advantage when food was scarce as long as they didn’t run something dangerous, but had greater risk when food was plentiful.

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  20. #4460
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    I'm not wholly against them either. I've just never encountered a foodstuff and thought, Hmmm, what this really needs is to be converted to a paste so that I can spread it on bread.
    It just seems a bit like making baby-food for grown-ups.

    Grant Hutchison
    I have to agree with your logic, but I notice the stuff is successfully sold everywhere. Muck and brass, or some such metaphor. It is a shame that salt and sugar sells so well, I am reminded about vested interests and the book Diet for new America. Food is big business, and not very scientific.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I’ve come to really like certain teas and brands now that I’ve found them, for instance Taylors Assam variety, also their lighter Afternoon Darjeeling and Ceylon. Similar Twinings varieties are good too. Much better than Liptons or some of the commonly available American brand teas.



    I have the impression I notice many flavors much more strongly than many others. I feel sorry for people that seem to barely be able to taste their food. I had some run-ins about food with my parents, but I ate most food. There were just certain things where I wouldn’t budge. I was told many times that my taste would change as I got older, but it never really did. Sure, I found more foods I liked as I found them, but pretty much what I preferred or disliked and why remained the same.

    Some years ago I read an article about grouping of what are called nontasters, tasters and supertasters, based on the number of taste buds. There may also be related differences in the sense of smell. So there seems to be a biological basis for at least part of why some are more picky than others. There is a hypothesis that having the different groups provided a survival advantage in the old days: supertasters are better at identifying dangerous plants and things that have gone bad and would be good for testing food for safety but would be more likely not to eat enough when food was scarce. On the other hand, nontasters had an advantage when food was scarce as long as they didn’t run something dangerous, but had greater risk when food was plentiful.
    I recall the idea and it makes sense. All groups need a variety of skills and talents. Another factor would be geography. You would expect tribes that have certain foods available would get skilled at detecting quality, but then they have to travel and encounter different opportunities. By now those tribes are well mixed, and trade has brought foods from around the world. We are such a new grouping with millenia of atavistic history. Fish eaters mixed with meat eaters, mixed with plant eaters.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I wouldn’t call it revolting, but I don’t like it at all and suspect if I hadn’t encountered it a number of times despite my preferences, I would. I never buy black licorice and probably haven’t eaten it since I was a kid, but occasionally have encountered licorice flavor jelly beans, so I am somewhat acclimated to the flavor. One qualification: I have never encountered real unsweetened licorice, and without the sweetness to soften the flavor I suspect I would find it truly revolting.
    Actually, I might also. The same goes with chocolate. I really like chocolate, and like it when the amount of non-sugar content is like 70%, but beyond that it starts tasting really bitter. Also, an interesting thing about licorice is that it (well, a different cultivar) is in traditional Chinese medicine. And maybe for that reason, I don't find Chinese medicine particularly distasteful, although a lot of people in Japan hate the taste.

    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I saw a video on a disgusting food museum in Europe and was surprised that root beer and pop tarts were there. I don’t often drink root beer but a root beer float with vanilla ice cream is a nice summer treat. I will say that the brand makes a big difference - A&W has too strong a spearmint flavor for me to enjoy drinking it (it’s okay for a float though), but there are other really good brands I much prefer.
    Yeah, root beer is another one. I really like it (pretty much any brand) because I grew up drinking it, but in Japan, people tasting it say it tastes like cough medicine (actually a fair characterization). I don't particularly dislike cough medicine though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    For myself, I am quite sensitive to sour and bitter flavors, and certain smells, like those of certain cheeses. Many cheeses taste to me like something that has gone bad.
    But something has!
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    I have a medical condition where there are foods I dislike to the point of literally throwing up if I try not to eat them.
    I guess you mean "if I try to eat them". I also have that condition, but only with a single food, for some reason (oysters). A couple of years ago at a drinking party I tried taking the challenge once again, and was literally gagging trying to get it down. I'm not sure why it happens, I'm sure it has some element of trauma to it.
    As above, so below

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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    I have to agree with your logic, but I notice the stuff is successfully sold everywhere. Muck and brass, or some such metaphor.
    Again, I'm not trying to make a logical case to persuade people not to like something that they like. Just reporting why I could cheerfully get through life without ever spreading anything on another slice of bread.
    It's not a criticism of anyone else's tastes, any more than my disliking a particular TV series or movie is a criticism of anyone else's tastes, even though people sometimes react as if it is. (Which is another thing I don't get. People generally seem to be pretty relaxed about finding out that someone else dislikes a book or a piece of music that they love, but if you dare to utter a word against some well-loved movie, you might as well join a witness protection programme immediately.)

    Grant Hutchison

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    But...but...youíre liking things wrong! So says the Internet, anyway. I canít count the number of times Iíve run into it in groups and forums. Not nearly so much here, though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PetersCreek View Post
    But...but...you’re liking things wrong! So says the Internet, anyway. I can’t count the number of times I’ve run into it in groups and forums. Not nearly so much here, though.
    I seem to get it in real life, too.
    Shortly before I retired, a recently-arrived colleague asked me, "Why does X always call you, 'The Man Who Doesn't Like Lord Of The Rings'? They say it every time they see you or speak about you."
    "Because I once said, within the hearing of X but not to X, that I found the movie The Fellowship of the Ring both boring and annoying."
    "Recently?"
    "No, when it was first released."
    "A decade ago?"
    "Longer. Yes."

    Grant Hutchison

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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I’ve come to really like certain teas and brands now that I’ve found them, for instance Taylors Assam variety, also their lighter Afternoon Darjeeling and Ceylon. Similar Twinings varieties are good too. Much better than Liptons or some of the commonly available American brand teas.
    I have friends, one of whom used to live in the UK, who have been rating all the teas they've been drinking lately. It's a lot of them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    I guess you mean "if I try to eat them". I also have that condition, but only with a single food, for some reason (oysters). A couple of years ago at a drinking party I tried taking the challenge once again, and was literally gagging trying to get it down. I'm not sure why it happens, I'm sure it has some element of trauma to it.
    I did, yes, and it's a bit beyond a single food in order to qualify. We're talking food groups, here.
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  28. #4468
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    I just ate, and enjoyed, Marmite on toast for breakfast. You can't explain that.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Again, I'm not trying to make a logical case to persuade people not to like something that they like. Just reporting why I could cheerfully get through life without ever spreading anything on another slice of bread.
    It's not a criticism of anyone else's tastes, any more than my disliking a particular TV series or movie is a criticism of anyone else's tastes, even though people sometimes react as if it is. (Which is another thing I don't get. People generally seem to be pretty relaxed about finding out that someone else dislikes a book or a piece of music that they love, but if you dare to utter a word against some well-loved movie, you might as well join a witness protection programme immediately.)

    Grant Hutchison
    Yes. On one of the food groups I frequent, I get annoyed at the occasional negative responses some folks feel they need to share in response to someone else posting "I dined at [restaurant x] and really enjoyed it" or "I made my favorite dish of [x] - who else likes it?" Particularly with that last one, people sometimes respond with a vomit emoji, which I find to be unconscionably bad manners.

  30. #4470
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    Quote Originally Posted by geonuc View Post
    Yes. On one of the food groups I frequent, I get annoyed at the occasional negative responses some folks feel they need to share in response to someone else posting "I dined at [restaurant x] and really enjoyed it" or "I made my favorite dish of [x] - who else likes it?" Particularly with that last one, people sometimes respond with a vomit emoji, which I find to be unconscionably bad manners.
    Yes, that's why I was keen to point out that my ex-colleague who spent ten years brooding over my dislike for Peter Jackson's The Fellowship of the Ring had actually overheard a conversation I was having with someone else, in which that person had solicited my opinion.
    If someone asks if anyone shares their positive opinion, it certainly seems rude to share a negative one, particularly if it amounts to no more than "I hated it!" And people who say, "I simply loved X, has anyone else tried it?" are probably not soliciting negative views. But if someone asks for "an opinion", they should be ready to hear a negative one. And if they expresses surprise at negative opinions of something they like, then maybe they should be prepared to hear other folk saying, "Well, I agree with the negative views because ..."

    But really, if a person overhears someone expressing a negative opinion, or chances upon their negative opinion on the internet or social media, it's time to don their grown-up pants and move on.

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Mar-25 at 05:49 PM.

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