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Thread: Trivial (or not so trivial) stuff that makes you happy.

  1. #4951
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    You get a locksmith.
    Now that I know what "rekey" means, I can report it's fairly easy to do. I used to swap cylinder pins in and out of a couple of old practice locks, back in my recreational lock-picking days (I was terrible at it, but it was fun in a masochistic sort of way). Of course, I wasn't actually rekeying, in the sense of producing a lock with the specific intention of having it turned by a particular key. And off course you'd need to source the parts.

    Grant Hutchison

  2. #4952
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    You see lock picking regularly in crime dramas, but any double edged key, like car keys, are fiendishly difficult to pick as are the type with dimples instead of a sawtooth pattern. So it suits the writers that many high security doors use single cylinder locks.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  3. #4953
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Sure enough, Simon suggested we follow this naming pattern and call it "Housey."
    Housey McHouseface.
    A: "Things that are equal to the same are equal to each other"
    B: "The two sides of this triangle are things that are equal to the same"
    C: "If A and B are true, Z must be true"
    D: "If A and B and C are true, Z must be true"
    E: "If A and B and C and D are true, Z must be true"

    Therefore, Z: "The two sides of this triangle are equal to each other"

  4. #4954
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    You see lock picking regularly in crime dramas, but any double edged key, like car keys, are fiendishly difficult to pick as are the type with dimples instead of a sawtooth pattern. So it suits the writers that many high security doors use single cylinder locks.
    They rarely seem to get even the superficial detail of picking a cylinder lock right--even something so simple as showing it to be a two-handed job is rare.

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #4955
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    This suggestion was duly rejected, and we now live at Cherry Tree Corner.
    We live at Bedside Manor, the product of an escalating joke-cum-dare between my wife and me. Occasionally friends address letters using the house name, but the sign generally just sits there, confusing passers-by.

    Grant Hutchison

  6. #4956
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    We live at Bedside Manor, the product of an escalating joke-cum-dare between my wife and me. Occasionally friends address letters using the house name, but the sign generally just sits there, confusing passers-by.

    Grant Hutchison
    My suggestion of CtPa Town was vetoed.
    A: "Things that are equal to the same are equal to each other"
    B: "The two sides of this triangle are things that are equal to the same"
    C: "If A and B are true, Z must be true"
    D: "If A and B and C are true, Z must be true"
    E: "If A and B and C and D are true, Z must be true"

    Therefore, Z: "The two sides of this triangle are equal to each other"

  7. #4957
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    We live at Bedside Manor, the product of an escalating joke-cum-dare between my wife and me. Occasionally friends address letters using the house name, but the sign generally just sits there, confusing passers-by.

    Grant Hutchison
    I had a boss once with sign “the manor in which I live” on his house. Bedside manor is much better! Here’s to Good Manors.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  8. #4958
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    They rarely seem to get even the superficial detail of picking a cylinder lock right--even something so simple as showing it to be a two-handed job is rare.

    Grant Hutchison
    I used to wonder if the broadcasters were anxious not to teach burglars, but you tube has made a nonsense of that. I suppose it’s the same as hackers breaking into secure passwords. I once worked on trying to make better locks but the good ones were already very good. We managed to devise keys that are hard to copy in the old ways with wax and so on, but we got overtaken by electronics. Even though that type are very easy to break into if you know how. It’s interesting to devise mechanical combination locks that defeat repeated tries, but battery angle grinders saw us off, (unintended pun). Oh and liquid nitrogen.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  9. #4959
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    Another ill-informed treasure is the old "shoot out the lock" trope. Fire a handgun directly into the lock mechanism, then turn the handle and open the door. Someone just hasn't thought that through.

    Grant Hutchison

  10. #4960
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    Yes, you also see credit cards swiped down the gap. That does not work either, even on slam locks, there is a parallel zone to defeat that.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  11. #4961
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    You just need this guy to help you out.

    We have old-fashioned mailboxes in our development but they are located in a bunch by the entrances. We got a new one for our new address but just left the old going. Once in a while something that matters turns up in it and I get busy and notify them.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  12. #4962
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    We'd probably have to have a Doctor Who themed name for our house, but "The TARDIS" is my wife's car.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #4963
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    I never worked in the right area but in my days in Australian Customs some of our staff working in the appropriate jobs, doing secret but legal searches, were taught how to pick locks and issued with an "official" lock-picking tool set. Here they are strictly illegal to possess without authority. I never heard of any of them doing any moonlighting outside working hours.

  14. #4964
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    The Moon Illusion

    I no longer care much why it exists, I'm just happy that it does. The moon was just above the horizon as I was returning from an evening walk, and it looked really big to me. I even felt for a moment that it looked spherical, rather than just circular.

    And I realized the last time I'd seen it full, it was upside down!

  15. #4965
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    A glorious Silver Dollar Moon is the best thing ever
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  16. #4966
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    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    When I've moved, I figured that I'd have to change all the locks anyway, since I didn't know where the keys were.
    "Since I didn't know where the keys were" implies you're talking about the house you're moving out of. There's absolutely no need for you to change those locks, because 1) it's almost a guarantee whoever moves in will do it when they move in; 2) it doesn't affect you at all if the locks aren't changed.

    The house you're moving into, though, you definitely should change the locks, specifically because you don't know where all the keys are.
    Sometimes you win, sometimes you learn

  17. #4967
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    Quote Originally Posted by SeanF View Post
    "Since I didn't know where the keys were" implies you're talking about the house you're moving out of. There's absolutely no need for you to change those locks, because 1) it's almost a guarantee whoever moves in will do it when they move in; 2) it doesn't affect you at all if the locks aren't changed.

    The house you're moving into, though, you definitely should change the locks, specifically because you don't know where all the keys are.
    No, the latter is what i meant. I turned over all my old keys (to better locks I'd installed myself over the years) to our buyer. It's the new house for which I didn't know where all the keys were, even if the agent gave us several.

  18. #4968
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    Locking has a nice risk assessment lesson. It makes sense to lock yourself in when sleeping but take care that you can escape if you need to. Cars in towns get locked because of thieves but in the wild, you must consider the risk of losing keys, so more complex tactics are required. Is the lock part of a fortress or just a slight but legal barrier? Does duplicating keys reduce your legal rights? Will the lock just mean more severe damage if someone uses force? What is the list of risks? When I had a farm, we had no real locks but a dog and gravel to make a noise. But nowadays flocks of sheep get stolen!
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  19. #4969
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    The discussion above reminds me of a line I heard from a security specialist.

    "Locks only discourage the honest thieves."
    Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.
    Isaac Asimov

    You know, the very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. They don’t alter their views to fit the facts. They alter the facts to fit their views.
    Doctor Who

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  20. #4970
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    The discussion above reminds me of a line I heard from a security specialist.

    "Locks only discourage the honest thieves."
    My father used to say, “Locks keep honest people honest.”


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  21. #4971
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    Quote Originally Posted by Extravoice View Post
    My father used to say, “Locks keep honest people honest.”
    My father used to say, "Where did you boys put the keys? Go find them!"
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  22. #4972
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    And did you notice that you always find them in the last place you look?

  23. #4973
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    ...
    Will the lock just mean more severe damage if someone uses force?
    ...
    When I was young, my father had a grocery store. The store had very good locks on all of the doors. However, upon closing up, he'd leave the drawer of the cash register in the open position. When I asked him why he'd do this, he explained that he always took the serious (paper) money home with him, and only change was left in the drawer. If some thief did get into the store, better he should just take the change rather than bust into the cash register, which was an expensive piece of equipment.

    It made sense.

  24. #4974
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    And did you notice that you always find them in the last place you look?
    Not me; I keep looking after I find them, just to thwart that saying.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  25. #4975
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torsten View Post
    And did you notice that you always find them in the last place you look?
    Don't remember.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  26. #4976
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    Our insurance company gives discounts for approved locks on doors and windows, but breaking in would not be difficult using even moderate force. So they expect gentle thieves. Social media hacking allows thieves to work out when the house is empty, and those organised types don’t waste time picking locks.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  27. #4977
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Another ill-informed treasure is the old "shoot out the lock" trope. Fire a handgun directly into the lock mechanism, then turn the handle and open the door. Someone just hasn't thought that through.

    Grant Hutchison
    Maybe not with a handgun, but is sure does work with a bazooka.

    Yes, you also see credit cards swiped down the gap. That does not work either, even on slam locks, there is a parallel zone to defeat that.
    It can work on some doors, if it's just shut and not locked with the key. Of course, when I tried to do that to get back into my own house it didn't work; when a locksmith tried it after paying him $150 it worked first time. Locksmiths are just thieves that get your money before breaking into your house.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  28. #4978
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    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Our insurance company gives discounts for approved locks on doors and windows, but breaking in would not be difficult using even moderate force. So they expect gentle thieves.
    The police officer who did the security assessment for our house, many years ago, said that they expected cautious and lazy thieves. So it's like the old joke about outrunning a polar bear. You actually don't need to outrun a polar bear, you just need to outrun one other member of your party. If you make it just a little bit harder, more time-consuming and riskier for opportunistic thieves, they'll go elsewhere.

    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    Social media hacking allows thieves to work out when the house is empty, and those organised types don’t waste time picking locks.
    I've maybe told the story before, about a conversation overheard in a very remote pub in the Outer Hebrides. Two guys with loud South London accents were sitting at the bar, both scrolling through their phones.
    One said to the other, "Is there a way you can put a map of your location up on Facebook?"
    "Sure mate," his friend replied. "Just scroll up to the top of the page. Yeah? And tap the big red button. No? It should be there. It's labelled, "I'm away from home. Steal my stuff."

    Grant Hutchison

  29. #4979
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Maybe not with a handgun, but is sure does work with a bazooka.
    Certain amount of damage on the other side of the door, however.
    The professionals use something called a "breaching round"--a frangible shotgun round fired at close range while wearing body armour and face protection. It basically removes the lock from the door structure, and disintegrates into powder while doing so.
    Often they'll just take out the the hinges instead, though.

    Grant Hutchison

  30. #4980
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    The police officer who did the security assessment for our house, many years ago, said that they expected cautious and lazy thieves. So it's like the old joke about outrunning a polar bear. You actually don't need to outrun a polar bear, you just need to outrun one other member of your party. If you make it just a little bit harder, more time-consuming and riskier for opportunistic thieves, they'll go elsewhere.

    I've maybe told the story before, about a conversation overheard in a very remote pub in the Outer Hebrides. Two guys with loud South London accents were sitting at the bar, both scrolling through their phones.
    One said to the other, "Is there a way you can put a map of your location up on Facebook?"
    "Sure mate," his friend replied. "Just scroll up to the top of the page. Yeah? And tap the big red button. No? It should be there. It's labelled, "I'm away from home. Steal my stuff."

    Grant Hutchison
    Perhaps its like bold pilots, there are old thieves and bold thieves, but no old, bold thieves.?

    Crime has moved on to the internet now, which not only makes thieves lives easier, but they can live in a different country. It makes lock picking a quaint hobby, one gives children perspex training locks for fun, (so I am told, I give demonstration Wimshurst machines)
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

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