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Thread: Trivial (or not so trivial) stuff that makes you happy.

  1. #4831
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    The Women's T20 World Cup (Cricket) final between Australia and India was played in Melbourne today. Australia won, but that is not what I am happy about as I don't like this shortened form of Cricket (male or female version). What was good was that there was a crowd of just over 86,000 people to see the game.This is by far the biggest crowd to attend a female only sporting event in Australia and is only just shaded by a crowd of 90,00 at a World Cup Football (soccer) match in South America (I think).

    Ten teams qualified for the final series - including Thailand.

  2. #4832
    My nieces just won another game on the way to wining provincials in hockey, they went into an overtime and about 20 seconds left they scored the goal.
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  3. #4833
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    I’m excited for my wife. Really excited. She has found her birth father and we think, her birth mother.

    A couple of Christmases back, I gifted her a DNA kit from Ancestry.com and her employer gave her one from 23andMe. Both returned possible matches for 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cousins but there were so many, she didn’t know where to start without having more information to go on.

    Then last week, one of them reached out to her on 23andMe, as did another on Ancestry. One of them spoke to a cousin of hers who approached her father. She asked if he knew of a baby girl given for adoption, who was born on my wife’s birth date. He quietly said, “She’s mine.” Boom. At 54 years of age, she now has the beginnings of a biological family tree...including three half siblings.

    Her birth mother was a little harder to research. We only had the name Kathy or Cathy along with her family name and Ancestry didn’t get us very far until my wife turned to Google. She found an obituary in which a “Kathleen” was listed as one of the decedent’s siblings. One of the cousins who reached out to her provided the names of other siblings and I was able to cross reference several Ancestry records based on that information. We even found her new name by marriage and found her Facebook page. My wife sent her a message and we await confirmation but we’re all but certain that she’s the one.
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  4. #4834
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    Hoping for the best outcome.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  5. #4835
    Same Peterscreek. All three of my aunts on mothers side were adopted and they know or found out about there birth famalies. One of my aunts died at 39, and I went to the viewing and there was the person who normally worked at subway at the late hours after I got out of the call center. She was one of my aunts birth sisters.
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  6. #4836
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    Yes Peterscreek, hoping everything comes to happy as possible conclusion.

  7. #4837
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    Speaking as a birth mother, I really hope everything works out well for her. Closed adoption can be devastating to all concerned, and I'm glad we're moving away from it.
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  8. #4838
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    Hoping for the best, PetersCreek!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  9. #4839
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Hoping for the best, PetersCreek!
    I'll add to the choir. Best of luck
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  10. #4840
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    Thanks, everyone. It's working out well so far. In fact, my wife (Dona) was thrilled to learn through her new "little sister" that her birth father, Richard, actually wanted her. The story as I understand it is a familiar one: Richard was a very young man and the birth mother, Kathleen, was a bit younger at 17. They were highschool sweethearts and when she became pregnant, they intended to marry. They had even gone so far as to mail the invitations. But the mother of the bride-to-be put a halt to it and Richard, who had joined the Navy, had to ship out shortly thereafter. The adoption took place during his absence and against his wishes.

    My wife hasn't harbored any ill will toward her birth parents. Her perspective has always been that their circumstances and choices, whatever they were, led to her being adopted by a wonderful, loving woman...and she would thank them, given the chance. Her adopted father, however, was another matter. Their relationship detiorated badly when he and her mother divorced and his behavior afterward only made matters worse. Hearing that her birth father never wanted to give her up was very uplifting and in a way I suppose it restores a little of what she lost.

    Also positive, is that she has hit it off with her little sister and one of the cousins who contacted her. On Sunday morning, the three of them spoke in a conference call that went for about 2½ hours and they had a grand time. Last night, Dona even made flight reservations for a short trip home in a couple of months to meet Richard, her little sister, and perhaps other family members. Current circumstances permitting, of course.
    Last edited by PetersCreek; 2020-Mar-16 at 09:15 PM. Reason: minor wording
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  11. #4841
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    Beautiful. Stories like that make me happy.

  12. #4842
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    Nice, Peterscreek!

    Medical students whose studies are suspended due to Corona situation are now helping to babysit kids from staff at our university hospital, after daycare centers are closing or restricting access. A very big employer in our region, they are hit pretty hard by school closings. I like that med students are in this way helping to free up "real" medical staff to deliver more care to patients and worry less about their kids.
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  13. #4843
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    Quote Originally Posted by slang View Post
    Medical students whose studies are suspended due to Corona situation are now helping to babysit kids from staff at our university hospital, after daycare centers are closing or restricting access. A very big employer in our region, they are hit pretty hard by school closings. I like that med students are in this way helping to free up "real" medical staff to deliver more care to patients and worry less about their kids.
    Little bit of history that has some parallels with the present day:
    Back in 1952 there was an outbreak of polio in Denmark. People were going into respiratory failure because their chest muscles were paralysed by the disease. In the absence of any mechanical ventilators apart from rare and complicated "iron lungs", a Danish anaesthetist named Bjørn Ibsen (who should have statues in his honour all across the world) pioneered the technique of performing a tracheostomy and applying intermittent positive pressure through that tube to inflate the lungs. Hundreds of medical students worked in shifts to keep patients alive in this manner, by squeezing self-inflating bags ten times a minute for hours on end. (Can you imagine being the patient under those circumstances?) The only way to manage this successfully was to put all the patients in one place--which is how the modern Intensive Care Unit originated.
    That episode led to the invention of the "mechanical medical student"--a simple weighted-bellows and valve system which is the ancestor of today's sophisticated ICU ventilators.
    When I was a medical student, I was taught by the respiratory physician who brought the first mechanical ventilator from Denmark to the UK. And when I trained as an anaesthetist, I used the final generation of purely mechanical ventilators, which worked like a very slow-motion pneumatic drill and which I remember much more fondly than the fancy-dancy electronic miracles of today.

    Grant Hutchison

  14. #4844
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    Peterscreek - it does sound like everything is going as well as possible. Greta news.

    Grant Hutchison - I wonder if there are stockpiles of the "old" ventilators that can be brought back for emergency use during the current crisis (if they are suitable) or were they all just junked?

  15. #4845
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Grant Hutchison - I wonder if there are stockpiles of the "old" ventilators that can be brought back for emergency use during the current crisis (if they are suitable) or were they all just junked?
    There are some around. They'd take a bit of reconditioning to get working again--the antistatic black rubber parts become very friable with time.
    They were great little ventilators for people with healthy lungs who needed to be paralysed under general anaesthesia to allow surgery, and they'd still work fine as "artificial medical students" for people with neuromuscular problems and normal lungs. But modern intensive care ventilators are extremely sophisticated beasts, full of sensors and servo mechanisms, that can deliver complicated ventilatory modes that minimize the stress on damaged lungs. And we're now extremely good at keeping people off mechanical ventilation, so if you get to the point when you need a ventilator for your lung disease, you need a clever ventilator.

    Grant Hutchison

  16. #4846
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    I wonder if CPAP machines could substitute? I recently received a new one and while my old machine was dodgy it still worked to provide positive air pressure. Just noisily.

  17. #4847
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    Quote Originally Posted by schlaugh View Post
    I wonder if CPAP machines could substitute? I recently received a new one and while my old machine was dodgy it still worked to provide positive air pressure. Just noisily.
    CPAP is one of several things used in hospital to help patients avoid mechanical ventilation. There are a lot of CPAP machines around, and they're of relatively simple construction. But once you need a ventilator nothing else will do, unfortunately.

    Grant Hutchison

  18. #4848
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    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    There are some around. They'd take a bit of reconditioning to get working again--the antistatic black rubber parts become very friable with time.
    They were great little ventilators for people with healthy lungs who needed to be paralysed under general anaesthesia to allow surgery, and they'd still work fine as "artificial medical students" for people with neuromuscular problems and normal lungs. But modern intensive care ventilators are extremely sophisticated beasts, full of sensors and servo mechanisms, that can deliver complicated ventilatory modes that minimize the stress on damaged lungs. And we're now extremely good at keeping people off mechanical ventilation, so if you get to the point when you need a ventilator for your lung disease, you need a clever ventilator.

    Grant Hutchison
    Thanks for the expert information. I thought that they may be inadequate for this task but didn't know enough to be sure.

  19. #4849
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    Maybe there should be an "Important stuff that makes you feel mildly cheered" thread, but this is the closest approximation available.

    After hearing and reading an extraordinary amount of fatuous opinion about coronavirus this morning (actually, no, Mothering Sunday is not a tradition that needs to be honoured this year), I've had a little bit of a rally in my opinion of human common sense and decency this afternoon.
    It seems that a number of singers have just ripped into their own social media followers, highlighting irresponsible behaviour with regard to the risk of disease transmission.

    Taylor Swift:
    I’m seeing lots of get-togethers and hangs and parties still happening. This is the time to cancel plans. Don’t assume that because you don’t feel sick that you aren’t possibly passing something on to someone elderly or vulnerable to this.
    Ariana Grande:
    The ‘We will be fine because we’re young’ mindset is putting people who aren’t young and/or healthy in a lot of danger. You sound stupid and privileged and you need to care more about others. Like now.
    Strong stuff, and timely.

    Grant Hutchison

  20. #4850
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    There are tons and tons of online options for educating children. All kinds of things that are free in the crisis.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  21. #4851
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    Now self isolated I am delighted to find friends in the same predicament and we can swap emails. Unfortunately none are suitable for the under seventies. Besides, some of our exotic business ideas could go viral.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
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  22. #4852
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    Dr. Li Wenliang was 34 when Covid-19 killed him. Got to remember that.

    CLARIFICATION: This made me very unhappy.
    Last edited by Roger E. Moore; 2020-Mar-17 at 09:07 PM.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  23. #4853
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    My kids school shut down. Now they are using the kitchen to provide meals to any one under 18 years of age in the district, student or not for the foreseeable future. Since that actually worked, they pulled a group to provide daycare for first responders who live in the district. Today it worked. See how it goes in the future. Daycare centers might be the next thing to get the "no go".
    Solfe

  24. #4854
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Dr. Li Wenliang was 34 when Covid-19 killed him. Got to remember that.
    He had also, as an ophthalmologist, spent a lot of time with his face close to the faces of infected patients. Front line health care staff often get a higher viral load, and therefore a more fulminant illness, than people who have been infected in passing. Got to remember that, too.

    Grant Hutchison

  25. #4855
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    Thumbs up

    Gas this morning, here in upstate South Carolina…
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  26. #4856
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    Trivial (or not so trivial) stuff that makes you happy.

    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    He had also, as an ophthalmologist, spent a lot of time with his face close to the faces of infected patients. Front line health care staff often get a higher viral load, and therefore a more fulminant illness, than people who have been infected in passing. Got to remember that, too.

    Grant Hutchison
    And yet, the hospital satellite office (physical therapy, etc) where my daughter works as a speech pathologist refuses to halt operations. This, despite the fact that the state’s governor decreed that all non-critical work be shut down.

    But hey, this qualifies as “medical”.
    [I’m Not happy]

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    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  27. #4857
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger E. Moore View Post
    Gas this morning, here in upstate South Carolina…
    Sorry, but is that good, bad or indifferent? Our petrol prices have dropped about 25 cents per litre.

  28. #4858
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    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Sorry, but is that good, bad or indifferent? Our petrol prices have dropped about 25 cents per litre.
    Good. First, we go by price per gallon. Average price for regular in the US currently (according to AAA) is about $2.27. California, where I live, uses a special blend designed to reduce certain kinds of air pollution. Because of the limited refining capacity and higher production cost, and also higher taxes, our average price for regular is about $3.35. I use premium and not too long ago I was paying well over $4.00 a gallon.

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  29. #4859
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Good. First, we go by price per gallon. Average price for regular in the US currently (according to AAA) is about $2.27. California, where I live, uses a special blend designed to reduce certain kinds of air pollution. Because of the limited refining capacity and higher production cost, and also higher taxes, our average price for regular is about $3.35. I use premium and not too long ago I was paying well over $4.00 a gallon.
    Thanks for the explanation.

  30. #4860
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    Yes I paid $1.99 a gallon two days ago at Costco. Of course it took half of my 401k to fill the tank.

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