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Thread: Trivial (or not so trivial) stuff that makes you happy.

  1. #5761
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    Happy that the last snow in my yard melted yesterday. Less happy about the annual chore of raking vast amounts of sand and gravel off my lawn. It's applied as grit to the street during the winter, but a portion of it gets plowed onto my lawn.

    I also completed some indoor wall painting and am happy with how the colour looks. Much more lies ahead...

  2. #5762
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Further research into my Bösendorfer grand piano indicates that the only number we could find on the piano actually could be its Opus number. I didn't believe that in the past because it would make it a very early one: Opus 1401. All Bösendorfers are numbered continuously, so this Opus would place it in the early 1840's. I used to think my piano was from around 1900. But Bösendorfer styling has changed very little over the decades and I've been able to trace back styling elements from my piano as far as 1860, so it's possible. What is particularly interesting with an early 1840's date is that a single piece cast iron plate was only patented in 1840. Add to that some time for Bösendorfer to adopt the principle, and that would make my piano a very early example of the technology.

    Somewhere in the past centuries my piano has had its legs and likely music desk replaced for more modern looking items, so I might one day ask a quote for reproduction items. I fear the cost migh be more than I'd want to spend though.

    But the piano is in good, playable condition and I'll cherish it even more now that I know it might very well be extremely old. For context: Dvorak's Bosie was from 1879; Liszt's historical Bosie performance was in 1838. So early 1840's places it in the glorious early years of the company, still under its founder Ignaz.
    Bösendorfer has replied. The low number found in the piano is not the opus number; still my piano is built between 1870 and 1883 so old nonetheless.

    With the research I've done now I've come to the conclusion that one must be VERY careful when buying a second hand Bösendorfer, even from the big name auction houses. In many cases they claim age based on a number that is NOT the Opusnumber. And in even more cases, they are selling piano's by other brands as Bösendorfers, just because they have "schuler Bösendorfer" on them which simply means that the piano builder learned the trade at Bösendorfer. And as those companies had low production, they also have a low serial number, et voila: a 1900 era piano by a lesser known brand suddenly becomes an extremely old Bosie. Not!

    Luckily I did not fall for this; I knew before buying mine what the meaning of "schuler" was so I bought the real deal, and I already assumed that the number on mine would have been too low for a realistic Opus number.

    Does this trivial stuff make me happy? Yes, because now I have official word on the age of my piano. And this makes it a sister to Dvorak's own piano.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  3. #5763
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Bösendorfer has replied. The low number found in the piano is not the opus number; still my piano is built between 1870 and 1883 so old nonetheless.
    Just as a question, because I'm a musician also. What was the number on your piano, the 1401?
    As above, so below

  4. #5764
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Just as a question, because I'm a musician also. What was the number on your piano, the 1401?
    And just to be clear, I am happy for your post because I have learned about a new type of piano, the Bösendorfer. Of course I knew about Steinway previously. In fact I am more of a player of more modern keyboards, so I know more about things like Moog, Roland, Fairlight, Oberheim. But I'm always happy to learn of more traditional instruments.
    As above, so below

  5. #5765
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    Yes, my piano has the workingnumber 1401 on it but its Opusnumber either got lost in a previous restoration or I haven't found it yet.

    Steinway is the big name now, mostly because they put their piano's in loads of concert halls etc so any serious student "had" to train on a Steinway as well. But there are other big names in the piano world, such as the "three B's" Bösendorfer, Bechstein and Blutchner. More recently, Fazioli also became a big name. Some say Bösendorfer are the best piano, and they are undeniably crafted to the highest standard, but there are other fabulous piano's as well. In the end it's a matter of taste. Some like the tonal character of one brand better. Bösendorfer tends to have a "vocal" character with less brightness than eg a Steinway. There has been a brightness war in pianoworld but I don't like a too bright tone so Bösendorfer suits me.

    I have a synth collection as well. More modern than 1870, yes. But still half my synths are nineteen seventies. Apart from those oldies, I also have some very recent ones.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  6. #5766
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post

    I have a synth collection as well. More modern than 1870, yes. But still half my synths are nineteen seventies. Apart from those oldies, I also have some very recent ones.
    Pray tell, what do you have? I have a really poor collection at present. I have just a Juno-di, and a Roland Gaia-SH01, and a Korg X5D. I kind of wish I had some more seventies ones, like a Minimoog, but alas I am limited now to just recent synths.
    As above, so below

  7. #5767
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    When I was a child, my mother routinely bought roses from one company. From what I can tell, they're the best rose-breeding company around. I bought a couple of bare-root climbing roses from them online last month, and they arrived yesterday. I'm soaking their roots today, and tomorrow, I plant them against my fence. In our own yard.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  8. #5768
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    That's awesome, Gillian! Just reading it made me happy too!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  9. #5769
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    When I was a child, my mother routinely bought roses from one company. From what I can tell, they're the best rose-breeding company around. I bought a couple of bare-root climbing roses from them online last month, and they arrived yesterday. I'm soaking their roots today, and tomorrow, I plant them against my fence. In our own yard.
    Spring, nostalgia, and home ownership have sprung!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  10. #5770
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    My wife let someone have it at the grocery store. Said person stopped dead in the middle of the main aisle and turned sideways so no one could walk past. Apparently someone texted the woman, so she decided to pull over and block all lanes.

    Three little facts: my wife has no poker face, likes to spar 20 something men in the ring twice a week for 2 hours a session, and the two of us have a shared secret, silent language that uses gestures and a bit of American Sign Language. Obviously, my concern was my wife telling this woman blocking the aisle where to go, or worse. As a distraction, I gestured at some of the discount Easter stuff and made some funny suggestions as what you could use these items for. My wife silently chuckled a bit and asked me for some easter lilies. All without a word. As we were loading the cart with the selected flowers, the woman blocking the aisle came back to planet earth to realize they were rudely blocking the entire main aisle. Instead of doing something smart, they decided to yell: "I'm sorry!" before moving out the way.

    As we walked past, the woman decided to add: "In the future, if you want to get past someone, the correct word is 'excuse me'."

    There were about 2 dozen people jammed up waiting to get by this woman, so she had quite the audience. Back to fact one and two. My wife has no poker face and can grind 20 year old men into the ground sparring, usually in groups of 3 or 4. I thought the thing I was attempting to avoid was about to happen. I literally bowed my head, knowing if my wife's mouth or "her guns" reacted, there would be a clean up needed in this aisle.

    There is a tiny fact I left out. Deafness runs on the maternal side of my wife's family. It affects every woman in her family to one degree or another going back generations. Four, that I have personally seen which is probably why we have this secret language to begin with.

    Instead of saying something mean or throwing a punch, my wife said, "What? I'm sorry?" complete with the distortion of a person who can't hear and proper American Sign. She also added the sign for "mask" and "can't hear", for good measure. All of this is pretty intuitive for anyone one understand, even without context. Nearly everyone within earshot decided to find something wildly more important to look at than this rude person or my wife. However, a few smiled, laughed or added their own two cents to the situation as my wife walked off, possibly pretending not to hear any of it. Or maybe she didn't hear any of it. I don't know. I'm not about to ask.

    I'm just glad no one got punched out.
    Solfe

  11. #5771
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    So to clarify Solfe, you're happy because the fight did not break out, or because your wife came up with the perfect non-zinger to make the foolish blocker look appropriately foolish?
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  12. #5772
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    So to clarify Solfe, you're happy because the fight did not break out, or because your wife came up with the perfect non-zinger to make the foolish blocker look appropriately foolish?
    I'm glad it was all peaceful. My wife is a firebrand, so the zing was so out of the blue was just bonus.

    Not that my wife has ever hit anyone, but there have been a few cases where someone else has raised a fist to her not releasing their danger until she does something. They might get the "Nurse Mom voice" or suddenly find that she maneuvers like a boxer. That's usually the stand down moment. Those events disturb me. I really can't wrap my brain around the idea of pressing a seeming physical advantage not realizing the chance of finding out that advantage doesn't exist all is racing to 100% the more you engage in that behavior.

    I used to work with kids and adults with disabilities. I have the humble opinion that whatever advantage or disability you think you have probably has no real world meaning in an actual conflict. "Every man a tiger" is one of the proofs that "man" and "tiger" are really poor word choices because "man" means anyone and "tiger" means something very bad happening to a person.
    Solfe

  13. #5773
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    I actually should be happy my wife found an outlet in boxing. Ever since we met, she's had a desire to learn something physical. Back in the 90's, I got her to come with me to Tai Chi. That lasted about a year before she switched to Kung Fu. There was a long 5-6 year break before she tried anything else. Mostly busy with the kids, really. Then she went on Krav Maga bender for a couple of years. Maybe 3. I keep telling her that our first sansi warned her about a lack of focus or consistency leads to undeserved confidence. She counters with, "I don't want to fight, I just want to be healthy. It doesn't matter how."

    This boxing thing has lasted about 5 years. Her coach is trying to get her to do powerlifting, so she's been working on core strength before she starts. That talk has been happening for a year now, but the boxing is integral to the core strength training so it isn't going anywhere. Edit - I should add that it helps that her coach started her with ballet and barre-training. It seems the continual shift in training methods helps her so long as the coach is the same person.

    Seeing her focused is great.
    Solfe

  14. #5774
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Pray tell, what do you have? I have a really poor collection at present. I have just a Juno-di, and a Roland Gaia-SH01, and a Korg X5D. I kind of wish I had some more seventies ones, like a Minimoog, but alas I am limited now to just recent synths.
    What I currenly have:
    -the first Korg ever: Minikorg 700
    -its duophonic big bother: Korg 800DV "Maxikorg"
    -original Mk1 Korg MS20 (the one with the "screaming" filters)
    -Minimoog (1981 or thereabouts)
    -Roland JV80 and Korg 01W/FD because they were dirt cheap
    -Nord Electro 4 for modern sounds
    -Roland JD-XI because it's hilarious how much value for money this is. A good drum computer and three synths, all nicely sequenced.

    I used to have loads of other synths and sold them all before they became very valuable (sigh): Roland D50 with programmer, JD800, JP8000, Juno 6, RS505, JX-3P with programmer, JX8P, Korg Polysix, Ensoniq EPS16+, Akai S1000KB, Crumar Performer, Moog The Source, huge modular Formant, Korg MS2000, Korg Z1, and others that I can't even remember. Now it's not as bad as it looks, as in most cases I sold synths to buy others. Most of the time I've had around 6 synths at once.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  15. #5775
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    I cycled to the beach today and dipped my feet in the water for the first time this year. It was too cold to keep them in there long, but it felt great.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  16. #5776
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    Last week it was 24°C celcius here and we were sunbathing in our garden. Now the kids are building a giant snowman. The snow is perfect. A few months late, but perfect.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  17. #5777
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    Last week it was 24°C celcius here and we were sunbathing in our garden. Now the kids are building a giant snowman. The snow is perfect. A few months late, but perfect.
    Sounds like our weather. Last week we had temperatures below freezing and about 3 inches (75 mm) of snow. This week we have temperatures in the 70s F (20s C). Next week it is supposed to be back to the 50s (around 10C), which is the normal for this time of year.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  18. #5778
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens View Post
    Pray tell, what do you have? I have a really poor collection at present. I have just a Juno-di, and a Roland Gaia-SH01, and a Korg X5D. I kind of wish I had some more seventies ones, like a Minimoog, but alas I am limited now to just recent synths.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    What I currenly have:
    -the first Korg ever: Minikorg 700
    -its duophonic big bother: Korg 800DV "Maxikorg"
    -original Mk1 Korg MS20 (the one with the "screaming" filters)
    -Minimoog (1981 or thereabouts)
    -Roland JV80 and Korg 01W/FD because they were dirt cheap
    -Nord Electro 4 for modern sounds
    -Roland JD-XI because it's hilarious how much value for money this is. A good drum computer and three synths, all nicely sequenced.

    I used to have loads of other synths and sold them all before they became very valuable (sigh): Roland D50 with programmer, JD800, JP8000, Juno 6, RS505, JX-3P with programmer, JX8P, Korg Polysix, Ensoniq EPS16+, Akai S1000KB, Crumar Performer, Moog The Source, huge modular Formant, Korg MS2000, Korg Z1, and others that I can't even remember. Now it's not as bad as it looks, as in most cases I sold synths to buy others. Most of the time I've had around 6 synths at once.
    Trivial things that make me happy: reading about synths on an astronomy forum. I'm a synth nerd too, though not much of a musician.

    There's some nice gear in those posts. I mostly have small cheap things... Behringer Neutron, Novation Bass Station II, Moog Sirin, Moog Werkstatt-01, Roland JD-Xi, Arturia Microfreak. The only thing I have with a full keyboard is a Yamaha MODX.

  19. #5779
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    What I currenly have:
    -the first Korg ever: Minikorg 700
    -its duophonic big bother: Korg 800DV "Maxikorg"
    -original Mk1 Korg MS20 (the one with the "screaming" filters)
    -Minimoog (1981 or thereabouts)
    -Roland JV80 and Korg 01W/FD because they were dirt cheap
    -Nord Electro 4 for modern sounds
    -Roland JD-XI because it's hilarious how much value for money this is. A good drum computer and three synths, all nicely sequenced.

    I used to have loads of other synths and sold them all before they became very valuable (sigh): Roland D50 with programmer, JD800, JP8000, Juno 6, RS505, JX-3P with programmer, JX8P, Korg Polysix, Ensoniq EPS16+, Akai S1000KB, Crumar Performer, Moog The Source, huge modular Formant, Korg MS2000, Korg Z1, and others that I can't even remember. Now it's not as bad as it looks, as in most cases I sold synths to buy others. Most of the time I've had around 6 synths at once.
    Cool to hear. I have to admit I'm jealous about the Minimoog, though it's a mono synth and maybe not so easy to maintain. Though probably the one that would serve me the best is the Nord.
    As above, so below

  20. #5780
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    The Minimoog is super easy to maintain. I haven't had to tune mine in years (one of the advantages of the later voice board). All components are discrete and available. THe only rare part inside is a uA726 double transistor, and I've got spares for those. It's a reliable component anyway. The Minimoog is built quite mil-spec in the first place. I've bought all my old synths taking maintainability into account. That's why I've sold the Roland RS-505 and other stuff with unobtainium components inside. OK, the JV80 and 01W/FD might be harder to maintain, but that's ultra reliable nineties electronics and there is very little value in them so you can just buy another if desired.

    The Minimoog being monophonic isn't really an issue; it's a bit on the fat side to use polyphonically anyway. I just use other synths for the polyphonic parts and then blow a hole in the wall with the Minimoog on top of them.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  21. #5781
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    Quote Originally Posted by kpatz View Post
    Trivial things that make me happy: reading about synths on an astronomy forum. I'm a synth nerd too, though not much of a musician.

    There's some nice gear in those posts. I mostly have small cheap things... Behringer Neutron, Novation Bass Station II, Moog Sirin, Moog Werkstatt-01, Roland JD-Xi, Arturia Microfreak. The only thing I have with a full keyboard is a Yamaha MODX.
    With that collection you should be able to make some very nice music!
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  22. #5782
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    With that collection you should be able to make some very nice music!
    That requires three things. Talent, time and energy. I lack all three. Well, work steals the latter two from me, and I never had the first.

    I have done some spacey new-agey things though, more in the past when I had a life.

  23. #5783
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    Spacey new-agey things are my pretend-talent anyway.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  24. #5784
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    Pork. The noble, albeit dead, pig.
    Nowadays, Americans mostly eat their pork in the form of bacon (which is good, don't get me wrong!), sausage, and assorted junk food. Which is just fine, more for me!
    Why, yes, I DID just cook a delicious pork chop for us! Why do you ask?
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  25. #5785
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Why, yes, I DID just cook a delicious pork chop for us! Why do you ask?
    Difficult thing to do well, the pork chop, but a fine thing when done well. I give you joy of it.

    (I deliberately say "done well", not "well done".)

    Grant Hutchison

  26. #5786
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    Yes indeed, I'm very careful not to get them overdone!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  27. #5787
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    Thick cut, bone-in pork chops; lightly cured in my favorite brine; smoked; then quickly seared. It's about time to do this again.
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  28. #5788
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    I like Saturdays because my Mom doesn’t have to do any working from home and we can go on nature walks together. Today we went to a county park I used to have cross country meets at and we just walked the trails and sat on the beach there, noticing the buds on the trees and smelling fires from campers. It’s really great to see my Mom so happy and relaxed when she works so hard the rest of the week.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  29. #5789
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Pork. The noble, albeit dead, pig.
    Nowadays, Americans mostly eat their pork in the form of bacon (which is good, don't get me wrong!), sausage, and assorted junk food. Which is just fine, more for me!
    Why, yes, I DID just cook a delicious pork chop for us! Why do you ask?
    We do pork at least several times a month. Multiple good recipes for pork chops or a pork loin (and of course the occasional sausage). Carnitas en salsa verde is one of my favorite Mexican dishes.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  30. #5790
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    Bösendorfer did some extra research on my piano. They can't trace an exact opus number, but to the best of their knowledge the piano would have been made in 1884. Which makes it exactly 100 years older than myself, which is nice.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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