Page 187 of 194 FirstFirst ... 87137177185186187188189 ... LastLast
Results 5,581 to 5,610 of 5800

Thread: Trivial (or not so trivial) stuff that makes you happy.

  1. #5581
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,779
    Yesterday, when I woke up, Mouse had moved himself from under the table, where I'd set up his nest, to in front of the back door. So I set up a nest for him there. Yesterday afternoon, he moved to a place he normally sits because his nest had gotten too wet. (He's on muscle relaxants and doesn't control his bladder.) This morning, he'd moved again to sit in front of the linen closet. I even got him to eat a little; we're about to start syringe-feeding to encourage him to eat if we have to.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  2. #5582
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Peters Creek, Alaska
    Posts
    13,766
    A few Bohemian waxwings came by to raid my mountain ash tree for the few remaining frozen berries. It's a horribly zoomed shot but that's about as close as I could get with the cell phone before they flew off.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Waxwing, Bohemian.jpg 
Views:	142 
Size:	1.40 MB 
ID:	25869
    Forum Rules►  ◄FAQ►  ◄ATM Forum Advice►  ◄Conspiracy Advice
    Click http://cosmoquest.org/forum/images/buttons/report-40b.png to report a post (even this one) to the moderation team.


    Man is a tool-using animal. Nowhere do you find him without tools; without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all. — Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

  3. #5583
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    16,781
    My brother and I saw a few on a nature trail the other day. They flew down and perched in the branches just above us, trying to work out if we had any birdseed.
    The greatest journey of all time, for all to see
    Every mission makes our dreams reality
    And our destiny begins with you and me
    Through all space and time, the achievement of mankind
    As we sail the sea of discovery, on heroes’ wings we fly!

  4. #5584
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,489
    Ah, nice. Just plain old "waxwings" in these parts, because they're the only species we've got. We're right at the edge of their wintering range here, and they generally arrive in small numbers. But every now and then we have an "irruption", when they turn up mob-handed and invade urban gardens looking for berries.

    Grant Hutchison

  5. #5585
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,779
    Mouse came and slept on my lap for a while yesterday.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  6. #5586
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,453
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Mouse came and slept on my lap for a while yesterday.
    Aaaaawwwwww

    Our Maki used to do that with me when she was younger. For reasons I don't know, she doesn't sit in laps any longer, though she is still otherwise a very social cat.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  7. #5587
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,970
    Our puppy, Finn, often sleeps on my lap when I'm in a recliner. (In a regular chair my fat belly takes up most of that lap space.)
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  8. #5588
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,777
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Mouse came and slept on my lap for a while yesterday.
    Good for Mouse!
    We hadn't had lap-cats for years, until just recently when one of ours, at age 12, decided to become one.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  9. #5589
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Depew, NY
    Posts
    12,461
    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    Our puppy, Finn, often sleeps on my lap when I'm in a recliner. (In a regular chair my fat belly takes up most of that lap space.)
    I thought it was Jake the Dog and Finn the Human.
    Solfe

  10. #5590
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,970
    Quote Originally Posted by Solfe View Post
    I thought it was Jake the Dog and Finn the Human.
    Woah, we live in a mirror Universe!
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  11. #5591
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    19,918
    My cat, Orange, sometimes sleeps on my lap when I’m sitting, but usually wants to sleep on my left side between my arm and body, with her head on my left shoulder or chest. It can be amusing/cute with her arms stretched out across my chest or over my shoulder, but it sometimes is annoying when I want to use my left arm.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  12. #5592
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,779
    Both our cats are lap cats, but Mouse has been hiding quite a lot lately. That he isn't, and he's making moves toward sociability, is definitely a good sign. And I saw him eat this morning, which is even better.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  13. #5593
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,453
    Quote Originally Posted by Gillianren View Post
    Both our cats are lap cats, but Mouse has been hiding quite a lot lately. That he isn't, and he's making moves toward sociability, is definitely a good sign. And I saw him eat this morning, which is even better.
    Yeah Mouse!
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    My cat, Orange, sometimes sleeps on my lap when I’m sitting, but usually wants to sleep on my left side between my arm and body, with her head on my left shoulder or chest. It can be amusing/cute with her arms stretched out across my chest or over my shoulder, but it sometimes is annoying when I want to use my left arm.
    I really hope Orange is a black and white cat, or maybe a grey tabby.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  14. #5594
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    19,918
    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    I really hope Orange is a black and white cat, or maybe a grey tabby.
    ‘Fraid not. Orange’s name is a bit of a clue to her fur color (orange tabby).

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  15. #5595
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,777
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    ‘Fraid not. Orange’s name is a bit of a clue to her fur color (orange tabby).
    In the world of cats, orange is called "red". And gray is "blue". And one of ours is a "seal point", which is dark brown.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #5596
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,609
    Today, 12 Feb., is the Lunar New Year for the Chinese. Yesterday our back fence neighbour, who is ethnic Chinese, dropped by to give us a plate of freshly cooked, and still hot, pork dumplings. We are 'friendly but not friends' with them so it was a nice surprise and they tasted lovely. We did give her some figs and grapes in return but we were the winners in the exchange. So Kung Hei Fat Choi to everyone.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Dumplings.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	137.3 KB 
ID:	25894

  17. #5597
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,453
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    Today, 12 Feb., is the Lunar New Year for the Chinese. Yesterday our back fence neighbour, who is ethnic Chinese, dropped by to give us a plate of freshly cooked, and still hot, pork dumplings. We are 'friendly but not friends' with them so it was a nice surprise and they tasted lovely. We did give her some figs and grapes in return but we were the winners in the exchange. So Kung Hei Fat Choi to everyone.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Dumplings.jpg 
Views:	16 
Size:	137.3 KB 
ID:	25894
    Nice. On top of everything else, those are some picture perfect dumplings.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  18. #5598
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,779
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    ‘Fraid not. Orange’s name is a bit of a clue to her fur color (orange tabby).
    That's okay, we had a cat named Grey when I was little. Guess what colour he was!

    Our first snow in the new house. Graham had, for reasons I'm not happy with, a half-day at work yesterday, so he got home before there was much accumulation. He also has today off, again for reasons I'm not happy with, but it means he doesn't have to maneuver down our street, which I'm quite sure will not get plowed.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  19. #5599
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Florida.
    Posts
    6,111
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    In the world of cats, orange is called "red". And gray is "blue". And one of ours is a "seal point", which is dark brown.
    Well, orange-haired humans are called "redheads," right?

  20. #5600
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Norfolk UK and some of me is in Northern France
    Posts
    9,702
    And “Robin red breast”, actually orange but there was no word for orange when robins were first named and no doubt redheads are back dated also.
    sicut vis videre esto
    When we realize that patterns don't exist in the universe, they are a template that we hold to the universe to make sense of it, it all makes a lot more sense.
    Originally Posted by Ken G

  21. #5601
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,489
    Quote Originally Posted by profloater View Post
    And “Robin red breast”, actually orange but there was no word for orange when robins were first named and no doubt redheads are back dated also.
    The OED's first citation for "redhead" meaning "having red hair" is actually a good 60 years later than its first citation for "orange" as a colour. I do doubt if we'd ever have called a robin an "orangebreast" if the colour name had been available. The punchy alliteration in "redhead" and "redbreast" are simply too appealing, compared to the clumsiness of any word incorporating "orange", which is pretty much alliteration kryptonite.
    (On a side note, "Robin" started off as a personal name applied to the bird originally called the "redbreast". We used to have a number of these, some of which are still slightly familiar (Tom Tit and Jenny Wren) and one at least completely assimilated (Mag Pie).

    Grant Hutchison
    Last edited by grant hutchison; 2021-Feb-13 at 03:00 PM.

  22. #5602
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,777
    Quote Originally Posted by DonM435 View Post
    Well, orange-haired humans are called "redheads," right?
    Except in Australia, where for some reason they are called "Blue".
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  23. #5603
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,489
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Except in Australia, where for some reason they are called "Blue".
    Probably an insulting reason, based on stereotypes about redheads being fighters and/or stupid and/or itinerants and/or manual workers. (There's a little cluster of blue/bluey slang in Australia, which seems to concentrate around railway workers, tramps, fights, mistakes and complaints.)

    Grant Hutchison

  24. #5604
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    31,779
    Yet there's a fairly charming cartoon called Bluey.
    _____________________________________________
    Gillian

    "Now everyone was giving her that kind of look UFOlogists get when they suddenly say, 'Hey, if you shade your eyes you can see it is just a flock of geese after all.'"

    "You can't erase icing."

    "I can't believe it doesn't work! I found it on the internet, man!"

  25. #5605
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,489
    At least Blue Heelers actually look a little blue, in some lights. And it would be really confusing if Australians started calling Red Heelers "Bluey".

    Grant Hutchison

  26. #5606
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,609
    My father was called 'Blue' as he was a redhead up until he was around 50 when his hair turned brown. It may have started out as insult possibly in regard to the Irish and a perceived violent nature but there seems to be a lot of conjecture about its origin. It has not been considered an insult here since at least the end of the 19th Century and is certainly in common use today without anyone even rising an eyebrow about its use. It is often used in that 'ironic' way to describe things the opposite of what they actually are. For example, when a Virgin Airline's 'associate' company was set up in Australia its livery was red so, naturally, it called itself Virgin Blue.

    My father certainly never considered it an insult and after years of hard physical labour, as a miner and tree-feller, he was certainly capable of redressing any wrongs he received.

    And, Gillianren I am glad that you and your children are enjoying 'Bluey'. My grandkids still love it and it is often amongst the highest rating programmes on local TV. to quote for one show " It was the most-watched broadcast across all free-to-air multichannels, and the eleventh most-watched broadcast overall. In 2019, the series was the most-watched program through time shifting." There has never been the slightest thought that Bluey having that name was any sort of insult.

    https://english.stackexchange.com/qu...n-called-bluey
    Last edited by ozduck; 2021-Feb-14 at 02:35 AM.

  27. #5607
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,489
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    My father was called 'Blue' as he was a redhead up until he was around 50 when his hair turned brown. It may have started out as insult, possibly in regard to the Irish, but it has not been considered an insult here since at least the end of the 19th Century and is certainly in common use today. It is often used in that 'ironic' way to describe things the opposite of what they actually are. For example, when a Virgin Airline's 'associate company was set up in Australia its livery was red so, naturally, it called itself Virgin Blue.

    My father certainly never considered it an insult and after years of hard physical labour, as a miner and treefeller, he was certainly capable of redressing any wrongs he received.
    Yes, people differ. I only know about redheads being called 'Blue' because of a young redheaded Australian I worked with for while, who very much did consider it offensive. (We got on to the topic because people were discussing the use of the word "ginger" for redheads in the UK, which some find offensive and which some shrug off, and he drew the analogy.)
    When I was a kid I didn't receive any hassle about being a redhead--my corner of the world has more redheads per capita (pardon the pun) than anywhere else, and it just wasn't a big deal. But attitudes have changed (for no reason I can discern) and redheaded kids are nowadays being bullied by schoolmates, sometimes with tragic results. So the whole "ginger" thing has taken on nasty connotations it didn't previously have.
    There's perhaps an analogy with the way people call Scots "Jock". My uncle, who moved to England in the 1940s, was "Jock" all his life, and never evinced any great concern about it. Whereas nowadays some Scots find it extremely offensive, and most are at least slightly irritated by it.

    Grant Hutchison

  28. #5608
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,609
    Quote Originally Posted by grant hutchison View Post
    Yes, people differ. I only know about redheads being called 'Blue' because of a young redheaded Australian I worked with for while, who very much did consider it offensive. (We got on to the topic because people were discussing the use of the word "ginger" for redheads in the UK, which some find offensive and which some shrug off, and he drew the analogy.)
    When I was a kid I didn't receive any hassle about being a redhead--my corner of the world has more redheads per capita (pardon the pun) than anywhere else, and it just wasn't a big deal. But attitudes have changed (for no reason I can discern) and redheaded kids are nowadays being bullied by schoolmates, sometimes with tragic results. So the whole "ginger" thing has taken on nasty connotations it didn't previously have.
    There's perhaps an analogy with the way people call Scots "Jock". My uncle, who moved to England in the 1940s, was "Jock" all his life, and never evinced any great concern about it. Whereas nowadays some Scots find it extremely offensive, and most are at least slightly irritated by it.

    Grant Hutchison
    Thanks for the personal notes. As you said I guess that it does depend on a persons own feelings whether any nick-name is insulting to them. And we simply can't, or shouldn't, tell them to just accept it. The apparent rise in bullying is something to be deeply regretted.

    In my years in Customs virtually everyone had a nickname. We had a 'Stretch', 'One Metre, 'Tugger', 'Mumbles', 'The Irish Tenor', 'Mad Dog' etc virtually ad infinitum. It may not surprise you that mine was actually 'Duck' . It was so prevalent that people who hadn't worked in your area would not even know your real name. It certainly happened to me a few times towards the end of my working life. I was reasonably senior, not just in years, by then and a 'technical expert' in Customs procedures. A junior staff member would be sent to me for advice and embarrassedly admit that they been told to see Duck for help but did not know my first name.

  29. #5609
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    20,489
    Quote Originally Posted by ozduck View Post
    In my years in Customs virtually everyone had a nickname.
    Nicknames fall into the "stuff I don't get" category. Some people seem to like having one, some people seem to like inventing them for others, and some organizations seem to pretty much require them as a badge of belonging. I've managed to get through life without ever having one, apart from a ten-week period in the summer of 1978, and I'm happy about that.
    But it seems to me there's a difference between a nickname acquired because of something specific to the named person (as mine was), and generic nicknames like "Jock", "Stretch", "Ginger", etc. Even setting aside the occasions when these are used deliberately to be offensive, they have the effect of labelling a person according to one tiny aspect of their existence, which is a gateway to stereotyping, and I think that's why a lot of people object to them, particularly younger people who are aware of these issues in a way that previous generations largely ignored.

    Grant Hutchison

  30. #5610
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Nowhere (middle)
    Posts
    38,970
    The ones that get to me are sarcastic markers of pseudo-familiarity like "sport", "pal" or "big guy" that adult strangers seemed to delight in calling me when I was an adolescent and especially sensitive to teasing or bullying.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •