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Thread: SpaceX

  1. #5101
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    Yes, looks like it. I'd still like to know how tall each bay is. I'll have to look for a good picture with a person in it and estimate from that.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  2. #5102
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    As I remember...

    Low Bay (Windbreak/Ironhenge): 35m

    Mid Bay: 49m

    High Bay: 81m

  3. #5103
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    The large "attachments" look to be the rocket-side parts of the booster catching system.

    Starship Gazer @StarshipGazer
    A few zoom pics of the very cool Starship Super Heavy Booster grid fin section. There are four cutouts, one for each of the grid fins plus some other attachment points.
    Pics taken 6/16/21 2:09 pm.

    IMG_20210619_172436.jpg
    IMG_20210619_172452.jpg

    https://twitter.com/StarshipGazer/st...88282460164104

  4. #5104
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    As I remember...

    Low Bay (Windbreak/Ironhenge): 35m

    Mid Bay: 49m

    High Bay: 81m
    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    Tower segment five is being stacked and SN16 is on the move.

    Anybody have a good guess at how tall those tower sections are? I'm thinking three bays at about 15 feet each, so 45 feet per section?
    I may be wrong but I believe Trebuchet is referring to the launch tower.

  5. #5105
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    I may be wrong but I believe Trebuchet is referring to the launch tower.
    That's correct, sorry I wasn't clear!
    ETA: Having just watched the latest NSF video and held a ruler up to the screen to compare heights of humans, I'm going to say five meters between horizontals on the launch support tower.
    Last edited by Trebuchet; 2021-Jun-19 at 10:55 PM.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  6. #5106
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    NOV ADS-30Q Drawworks hoist mounted

    Hook weight: 1,245 tonnes
    Lines: 16

    https://youtu.be/XZ0eXwdGWTw

  7. #5107
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    Big SOB...

    I added the metric conversions...

    PDF...
    https://oeaaa.faa.gov/oeaaa/external...erID=474845306

    ** DETERMINATION OF NO HAZARD TO AIR NAVIGATION **
    >
    >
    Structure: Launch Tower
    Location: Brownsville, TX
    Latitude: 25-59-45.95N NAD 83
    Longitude: 97-09-16.94W

    Heights:

    9 feet site elevation (SE) (2.743m)

    479 feet above ground level (AGL) (146m)

    488 feet above mean sea level (AMSL) (148.742m)
    >

  8. #5108
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    How many sections are stacked in the finished version? Then is there anything above the last section like a crane? If how much of the 479' is taken up by the equipment above the last section?

  9. #5109
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    I think it's to be eight sections in all.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  10. #5110
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    NOV ADS-30Q Drawworks hoist mounted

    Hook weight: 1,245 tonnes
    Lines: 16

    https://youtu.be/XZ0eXwdGWTw
    That is the hook load capacity, not the hook weight. I've deal with a hook which had an own weight of 400 tons, so on that scale it is important to make the distinction.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  11. #5111
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    That is the hook load capacity, not the hook weight. I've deal with a hook which had an own weight of 400 tons, so on that scale it is important to make the distinction.
    That's what I meant but didn't type

    I'd love to see a hook that large as the crane would be a freakin' beast

  12. #5112
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    The 400 ton hook (5000 ton load capacity) was on a crane that was like a stout version of Frankencrane. And with a fixed base, or the counterweight would have been ridiculous.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  13. #5113
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    There's so much about this project that's ridiculous in scale

  14. #5114
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    Moved left from July

    Transporter-1 ended up launching 143 satellites. Transporter-2's count is in flux, but will include payloads for the DoD's US Space Development Agency, ESA, NASA, SpaceFlight Inc. (a space launch procurer & SHERPA space tug operator), and a host of others.

    Date: June 25, 2021
    Time: 1456 - 1554 Eastern (1856 - 1954 GMT)
    Booster: B1060.8
    Pad: LC-40
    Orbit: 525km Sun Synchronous Orbit
    Recovery: LZ-1 Return To Launch Site (RTLS)

    Flight Club trajectory maps
    https://twitter.com/flightclubio/sta...09484032020480
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2021-Jun-22 at 10:26 PM.

  15. #5115
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    Launch support tower section 8 is shown starting in the latest NSF video. It's only two bays tall instead of three, like the others.
    Also, bye, "Tankzilla", and Thanks for all the lifts!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  16. #5116
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    CH4/OX hot gas booster reaction control thruster packs have been shipped from the McGregor test center and mounted. This was a long-pole item.

    https://youtu.be/mNr9046h_0I

  17. #5117
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Moved left from July

    Transporter-1 ended up launching 143 satellites. Transporter-2's count is in flux, but will include payloads for the DoD's US Space Development Agency, ESA, NASA, SpaceFlight Inc. (a space launch procurer & SHERPA space tug operator), and a host of others.

    Date: June 25, 2021
    Time: 1456 - 1554 Eastern (1856 - 1954 GMT)
    Booster: B1060.8
    Pad: LC-40
    Orbit: 525km Sun Synchronous Orbit
    Recovery: LZ-1 Return To Launch Site (RTLS)

    Flight Club trajectory maps
    https://twitter.com/flightclubio/sta...09484032020480
    Is it retired?

  18. #5118
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    Some of Transporter-1's were short lived cubesats, but many will be up for some time.

  19. #5119
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    National Air and Space Museum @airandspace
    Announcing the winner of the 2021 Michael Collins Trophy for Current Achievement: The SpaceX Crew Dragon Team.

    @SpaceX receives this award for the successful Demo-2 mission, which returned NASA human spaceflight to American soil in 2020. #CollinsTrophy

    https://twitter.com/airandspace/stat...16873823731720

  20. #5120
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Some of Transporter-1's were short lived cubesats, but many will be up for some time.
    ended up
    Doesn't make sense in tis context, but English is my second language.
    Last edited by bknight; 2021-Jun-24 at 01:10 PM. Reason: Context

  21. #5121
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Doesn't make sense in tis context, but English is my second language.
    They would only work (function) for a short time, but they stay in orbit for a longer time.
    "I'm planning to live forever. So far, that's working perfectly." Steven Wright

  22. #5122
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    Doesn't make sense in tis context, but English is my second language.
    I think what happened is that under the SmallSat Rideshare programme Transporter-1 was made available for businesses to send up small satellites to space on a reusable Falcon 9 booster - and it ended up (ie eventually contained after all clients had provided their spacecraft) transporting 143 satellites etc.

    More details and a video of the flight can be seen at>
    Space X Transporter-1 mission

    On board this launch were 133 commercial and government spacecraft (including CubeSats, microsats, and orbital transfer vehicles) and 10 Starlink satellites – the most spacecraft ever deployed on a single mission. The Starlink satellites aboard this mission were the first in the constellation to deploy to a polar orbit.
    The booster used was B1058 on its 5th flight. it has now been used 8 times, including its first flight launching Endeavour to take 3 astronauts to the ISS, on the Crew Dragon Demo-2 flight.

    Hope that helps.

  23. #5123
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    Sounds like they'll remove the hot gas thrusters on Booster 3 in order to speed up the Orbital Flight Test. Cold gas will be quicker to integrate, and they're on a mission.

    Parts of an upcoming Starship OFT video render by Alexander Svan, model by NeoPork. Musk seems to like it

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1407944055170940928

    https://youtu.be/KtcWazJ00RM

    https://youtu.be/Cjq85zVUW7A

  24. #5124
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Moved left from July

    Transporter-1 ended up launching 143 satellites. Transporter-2's count is in flux, but will include payloads for the DoD's US Space Development Agency, ESA, NASA, SpaceFlight Inc. (a space launch procurer & SHERPA space tug operator), and a host of others.

    Date: June 25, 2021
    Time: 1456 - 1554 Eastern (1856 - 1954 GMT)
    Booster: B1060.8
    Pad: LC-40
    Orbit: 525km Sun Synchronous Orbit
    Recovery: LZ-1 Return To Launch Site (RTLS)

    Flight Club trajectory maps
    https://twitter.com/flightclubio/sta...09484032020480
    Will be interesting to see how many craft Transporter-2 takes up.

    Some interesting info from spaceflight.com re what is due to be on board.

    …we will debut TWO different orbital transfer vehicles for the first time, including the industry’s first-ever electric propulsion vehicle, Sherpa-LTE.
    It will be the 8th flight for booster B1060. The achievement rate for successfully landing a booster like this seems to be improving all the time.

    This programme seems to be offering a new - and presumably significantly cheaper - way for agencies and commercial companies to launch their small sats into orbit.

  25. #5125
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    Apparently the purpose of the Sherpa is to enable all the craft to be communicated with after launch. This was to fix a problem with the original Rideshare SSO-A/ mission from 2018.

    There is more from everyday astronaut.

    For the third time, Falcon 9 will be flying with a third stage on the Transporter-2 mission. The third “transfer” stage, the SHERPA-FX, is a satellite dispenser designed by Spaceflight to deploy secondary payloads. This ensures that other payloads cannot interfere with communications to the satellite after launch. This was a problem on the SSO-A mission, where many satellite providers could not communicate with their satellites after deployment, as they were too close together. While the SHERPA-FX does not have any on-board propulsion, it is the first of several models of SHERPA. Other versions have a monopropellent to boost payloads into different orbits.

    Falcon 9’s second stage will deploy SHERPA-FX like any other payload. After separation, the transfer stage will coast distancing itself from the Falcon 9 second stage and the deployed payloads, while four of them stay attached. During this, the stage will continue providing attitude control, telemetry, and communications to the satellites and the ground.

    The primary purpose of SHEPRA on this mission will be to ensure that unlike on SSO-A, all the small sats are able to be communicated with after reaching orbit. On Transporter-2, there are just under 25 payloads riding on SHERPA. These payloads include Astrocast, LEMUR, HawkEye Cluster 3, Lynk-06, SpaceBee, PAINANI-2, and TagSat-2.

    SHERPA-LTE1

    In addition to the SHERPA-FX transfer stage, the SHERPA-LTE1 will also fly on the Transporter-2 mission. The LTE1 serves a similar purpose to the FX; however, unlike the SHERPA-FX the stage has its own propulsion system. The stage is equipped with a Xenon ion thruster, which is used to bring the satellites to a different orbit. Transporter-2 will mark the first use of the SHERPA-LTE transfer stage, and will carry up to 14 satellites.

    The SHERPA-LTE1 will be deployed from the second stage like any other payload. On this mission it will carry the Shasta, Faraday Phoenix, Tiger-2, ARTHUR-1, LEMUR, Polar Vigilance KSF1, and Tenzing satellites.

  26. #5126
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noclevername View Post
    They would only work (function) for a short time, but they stay in orbit for a longer time.
    If you would have gone back to the post in question

    ..."Transporter-1 ended up launching 143 satellites."
    This has little to do with CubeSats, other than launching them. "ended up is the phrase referring to Transporter-1" in this context.
    So if the transporter ended up then it no longer functions/operates.
    That is why I questioned it.

  27. #5127
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Moved left from July

    Transporter-1 ended up launching 143 satellites. Transporter-2's count is in flux, but will include payloads for the DoD's US Space Development Agency, ESA, NASA, SpaceFlight Inc. (a space launch procurer & SHERPA space tug operator), and a host of others.

    Date: June 25, 2021
    Time: 1456 - 1554 Eastern (1856 - 1954 GMT)
    Booster: B1060.8
    Pad: LC-40
    Orbit: 525km Sun Synchronous Orbit
    Recovery: LZ-1 Return To Launch Site (RTLS)

    Flight Club trajectory maps
    https://twitter.com/flightclubio/sta...09484032020480
    Wouldn't make better sense to say Trasporter-1 HAS launched...

  28. #5128
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    If you would have gone back to the post in question



    This has little to do with CubeSats, other than launching them. "ended up is the phrase referring to Transporter-1" in this context.
    So if the transporter ended up then it no longer functions/operates.
    That is why I questioned it.
    I see where you're coming from, second language confusion.

    People can sign up satellites of various size and mass until the Transporter mission is full. In this case, the sum of all satellites "ended up" (in this context meaning "resulted in") being 143.

    So "ended up" doesn't imply anything about it being its last mission or something like that here.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  29. #5129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    I see where you're coming from, second language confusion.

    People can sign up satellites of various size and mass until the Transporter mission is full. In this case, the sum of all satellites "ended up" (in this context meaning "resulted in") being 143.

    So "ended up" doesn't imply anything about it being its last mission or something like that here.
    I guess the best that can be said, it is poorly worded.

  30. #5130
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    "ended up" is slightly more informal than some of its synonyms such as "resulted in" but a common phrase in this meaning nonetheless. But I can see how it can be confusing in a second language situation, where the phrase would be interpreted too literally, especially in the context of a launcher where every flight can be its last.

    If I told you that I did a lot of measuring, planning, and rearranging but my car ended up transporting 4 bicycles at once, you'd likely not assume that would have been the end of my car.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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