Page 123 of 127 FirstFirst ... 2373113121122123124125 ... LastLast
Results 3,661 to 3,690 of 3794

Thread: SpaceX

  1. #3661
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    Thursday's StarLink launch

    Time: 1214 Eastern (1614 UT)

    https://youtu.be/2gbVgTxLgN0

  2. #3662
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,482
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Boca Chica road closures (all Eastern Time)

    Most likely moving SN-08's nose cone goes to the pad for installation, perhaps the second static fire. A flight to 15+ km on the 22nd is possible, but we'll see.

    October 21: 0800 - 1300, 1600 - 1800, 2200 - 0700

    October 22: 1000 - 1900

    They're also applying a white coating to a nose cone, so it's possible they're building the lunar Starship HLS (Human Lander System) prototype for NASA..
    Any news concerning road closures for the 15 km hop?

  3. #3663
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    This is the run-up, and if all goes well we may see the flight in a week or two.

    Meanwhile, hello nurse!!

    Austin Barnard @austinbatnard45
    NASA Artemis Moon lander anyone?
    https://t.co/ORhSMLq12v

    IMG_20201022_125012.jpg

    https://twitter.com/austinbarnard45/...18065872556035
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-Oct-22 at 05:11 PM.

  4. #3664
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,053
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Thursday's StarLink launch

    Time: 1214 Eastern (1614 UT)

    https://youtu.be/2gbVgTxLgN0

    "Stood down" "to allow additional time for mission assurance work". You can kinda tell how big a company is getting by its inability to use clear language.

    Meanwhile, down at Boca Chica, both the "Tankzilla" crane and S/N 8 nosecone have arrived at the launch site. I was expecting the crane to arrive on its own crawler tracks, tearing up the highway as it went. But it arrived on a couple of the multiwheel transporters, to be set down onto some cribbing. Which makes perfect sense. Both the crane and transporters belong to the same company, Roll-Lift. Lots of suppliers and contractors and leasing companies are doing pretty well in the Brownsville area lately!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  5. #3665
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    Integrating SN-08 (LabPadre cam)

    Starship SN8 integrated.jpg

  6. #3666
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    19,317
    Wow, it is finally starting to look like a real spaceship . . . or something you might see on a science fiction book cover from the 1930s-50s.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  7. #3667
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,053
    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    Wow, it is finally starting to look like a real spaceship . . . or something you might see on a science fiction book cover from the 1930s-50s.
    That certainly seems to be an inspiration!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #3668
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589

  9. #3669
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NEOTP Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,281

  10. #3670
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    19,317
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    I like that one. I set it as my laptop's background. It really does look like another science fiction/reality convergence. It just better work out well, or I'm going to be very disappointed.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  11. #3671
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,796
    And to think that this is only half the stack!
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  12. #3672
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    And to think that this is only half the stack!
    Yeah, the full stack is taller than Saturn V with >2x the thrust. Beastly.

    The fisheye effect in BCG's image got to me a bit, so I ran it through a filter...

    IMG_20201022_212729-lens-filter.jpg

  13. #3673
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    The beautiful north coast (Ohio)
    Posts
    50,050
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Yeah, the full stack is taller than Saturn V with >2x the thrust. Beastly.

    The fisheye effect in BCG's image got to me a bit, so I ran it through a filter...

    IMG_20201022_212729-lens-filter.jpg
    Shiny (deliberate Firefly reference).
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  14. #3674
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,796
    Yes it's sufficiently shiny. But the REAL rocket engineering question is: is it pointy enough? It needs to be pointy. Pointy is scary.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  15. #3675
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,482
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Yeah, the full stack is taller than Saturn V with >2x the thrust. Beastly.

    The fisheye effect in BCG's image got to me a bit, so I ran it through a filter...

    IMG_20201022_212729-lens-filter.jpg
    For my benefit how many engines at what thrust?

  16. #3676
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    SN-08 has 3 Raptor sea level engines at about 170 tonnes (~375,000 lbf) thrust each, so 1,125,000 lbf at full throttle.

    The full orbital pack is 6 Raptors, either 3 sea level + 3 R-Vacs, or 6 sea levels. 6 sea levels is good for cislunar. Sea level Raptors should be at 250 tonnes (551,000 lbf) by then.

    Starship point to point transports could carry as many as 10 sea level Raptors, 3 in the center and up to 7 in the outer ring.

    It's not clear if they'd use 300 tonne (661,000 lbf) R-Boost engines in the outer ring of Starships.
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-Oct-23 at 08:12 PM.

  17. #3677
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,482
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    SN-08 has 3 Raptor sea level engines at about 170 tonnes (~375,000 lbf) thrust each, so 1,125,000 lbf at full throttle.

    The full orbital pack is 6 Raptors, either 3 sea level + 3 R-Vacs, or 6 sea levels. 6 sea levels is good for cislunar. Sea level Raptors should be at 250 tonnes (551,000 lbf) by then.

    Starship point to point transports could carry as many as 10 sea level Raptors, 3 in the center and up to 7 in the outer ring.

    It's not clear if they'd use 300 tonne (661,000 lbf) R-Boost engines in the outer ring of Starships.
    That doesn't compute to
    "Yeah, the full stack is taller than Saturn V with >2x the thrust."

  18. #3678
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    15,796
    The full stack also contains a SuperHeavy booster underneath Starship, which will sport up to 30 Raptors as a first stage. Fire me up.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  19. #3679
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    That doesn't compute to
    "Yeah, the full stack is taller than Saturn V with >2x the thrust."
    Starship is just the upper stage. The Super Heavy booster will have up to 8 sea level Raptors in the center cluster (170 (early) - 250 tonnes), and up to 20 (250 (early) - 300 tonnes) R-Boost engines in its outer ring.

    Pending next week's update this means up to 28 engines in the first stage alone, variable by the payloads need.

    It's a monster.
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-Oct-23 at 11:32 PM.

  20. #3680
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,482
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Starship is just the upper stage. The Super Heavy booster will have up to 8 sea level Raptors in the center cluster (170 (early) - 250 tonnes), and up to 20 (250 (early) - 300 tonnes) R-Boost engines in its outer ring.

    Pending next week's update this means up to 28 engines in the first stage alone, variable by the payloads need.

    It's a monster.
    So it has a possibility of GT 2x Saturn five at 8000 tonnes versus 3850?

  21. #3681
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    As it is now, but next week SpaceX will post a Starship update and a few things are bound to change. Thrust go down? Not likely - they've been talking ~8000 tonnes for a few years.

  22. #3682
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    4,302
    So latest Starlink mission seems to have gone off without a hitch:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjJufR31igA

  23. #3683
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    SN-08 etc. are the small version of SpaceX's Starship.

    Caspar 🚀 (Stanley Creative) @Caspar_Stanley
    Just a reminder that SpaceX will actually offer a 22-meter extended fairing variant of Starship to future customers. 👀

    Current fairing is 17.24 meters tall.

    It might not look like a big difference here, but that's an extra 4.76 meters, which adds a good ~239m of volume! 🤯

    IMG_20201024_212244.jpg
    IMG_20201024_212643-highlighted.jpg

    https://twitter.com/Caspar_Stanley/s...31919858860032

  24. #3684
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Posts
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    SN-08 etc. are the small version of SpaceX's Starship.

    Caspar �� (Stanley Creative) @Caspar_Stanley
    Just a reminder that SpaceX will actually offer a 22-meter extended fairing variant of Starship to future customers. ��

    Current fairing is 17.24 meters tall.

    It might not look like a big difference here, but that's an extra 4.76 meters, which adds a good ~239m of volume! ��

    IMG_20201024_212244.jpg
    IMG_20201024_212643-highlighted.jpg

    https://twitter.com/Caspar_Stanley/s...31919858860032
    SpaceX is now actively involved in developments in the space industry, but a question came to my mind that I could not find an answer to in this thread. Is there a collaboration between SpaceX and other companies? Are the developments of other companies used to create shuttles, etc.? The question came to my mind because I began to wonder what companies in the world are developing shuttles, rockets, and components for spacecraft. If you take a payload control system, Skyrora is developing and producing this part https://www.skyrora.com/third-stage which allows you to put a satellite or shuttle into orbit. That is why the question arose. Because, it seems to me, developing a device with the involvement of other companies is a sane idea that will help save time and achieve a quick overall result.
    Last edited by Kay Burton; 2020-Oct-26 at 08:07 AM.

  25. #3685
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    4,302
    Quote Originally Posted by Kay Burton View Post
    SpaceX is now actively involved in developments in the space industry, but a question came to my mind that I could not find an answer to in this thread. Is there a collaboration between SpaceX and other companies? Are the developments of other companies used to create shuttles, etc.? The question came to my mind because I began to wonder what companies in the world are developing shuttles, rockets, and components for spacecraft. If you take a payload control system, Skyrora is developing and producing this part https://www.skyrora.com/third-stage which allows you to put a satellite or shuttle into orbit. That is why the question arose. Because, it seems to me, developing a device with the involvement of other companies is a sane idea that will help save time and achieve a quick overall result.
    I think the major collaborations SpaceX has are NASA and the DoD. SpaceX doesn't really work with other spacecraft developers, SpaceX's approach is 'vertical integration' of production, essentially building everything in house. The other news space companies are either too small or direct rivals and old space like Boeing and Lockheed Martin are part of the problem not the solution.
    Last edited by Garrison; 2020-Oct-26 at 11:22 AM.

  26. #3686
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    Quote Originally Posted by Garrison View Post
    I think the major collaborations SpaceX has are NASA and the DoD. SpaceX doesn't really work with other spacecraft developers, SpaceX's approach is 'vertical integration' of production, essentially building everything in house. The other news space companies are either too small or direct rivals and old space like Boeing and Lockheed Martin are part of the problem not the solution.
    SpaceX does work with other companies, and has outside suppliers, but it's not often reported.

    Further, starting in August, 2018 they began Mars Workshops starting at the University of Colorado, Boulder. This included a large & diverse group,

    https://www.space.com/41404-spacex-s...-workshop.html

    In Feb. 2018 they also held the MarX: Mars Subsurface Exploration symposium at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.

    https://kiss.caltech.edu/workshops/marsX/marsX.html
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-Oct-27 at 02:03 AM.

  27. #3687
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    Crew Dragon Crew-1 "Resilience": game on

    HOUSTON (NASA PR) — NASA and SpaceX now are targeting 7:49 p.m. EST Saturday, Nov. 14, for the launch of the first crew rotation mission to the International Space Station as part of the agency’s Commercial Crew Program.

    Managers of NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission will hold a media teleconference at 4 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Oct. 28, to discuss the upcoming launch, including results from recent testing of the Falcon 9 Merlin engines following unexpected data SpaceX noted during a recent non-NASA launch. Audio of the teleconference will stream live on the agency’s website.

    Briefing participants include:

    Kathy Lueders, associate administrator, Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, Washington
    Steve Stich, manager, Commercial Crew Program, NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston
    Hans Koenigsmann, vice president, Build and Flight Reliability, SpaceX, Hawthorne, California
    NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission will launch the agency’s astronauts Michael Hopkins, Victor Glover, and Shannon Walker, along with Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) mission specialist Soichi Noguchi, from Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy.

    Crew-1 astronauts will join the Expedition 64 crew of Commander Sergey Ryzhikov, and Flight Engineers Sergey Kud-Sverchkov and NASA astronaut Kate Rubins. The arrival of Crew-1 will increase the regular crew size of the space station’s expedition missions from six to seven astronauts, adding to the amount of crew time available for research.

    The Crew-1 mission will launch a few days after the Nov. 10 scheduled launch of NASA’s Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich mission on a SpaceX Falcon 9 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, following a thorough review of launch vehicle performance.

    Audio of the teleconference will stream live online at:

    https://www.nasa.gov/live

    For more information about the mission, visit:

    https://www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew

  28. #3688
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    The Great NorthWet
    Posts
    16,053
    Oh, good! The previous schedule had it in the middle of the night, this is a better time to watch!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  29. #3689
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    Starlink US pricing,

    After the FCC rural subsidy auction, and assuming SpaceX gets funding, covered customer's costs should be lower.

    And if those revenue estimates hold up, SpaceX will have 50% more income than NASA has budget.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/10/27/spac...st-begins.html

    SpaceX’s Starlink satellite internet service is priced at $99 per month, according to e-mail

    SpaceX is expanding the beta test of its Starlink satellite internet service, reaching out via email on Monday to people who expressed interest in signing up for the service.

    Known as the “Better Than Nothing Beta” test, according to multiple screenshots of the email seen by CNBC, initial Starlink service is priced at $99 a month – plus a $499 upfront cost to order the Starlink Kit. That kit includes a user terminal to connect to the satellites, a mounting tripod and a wifi router. There is also now a Starlink app listed by SpaceX on the Google Play and Apple iOS*app stores.
    >
    ...Elon Musk’s company posted that form in June and, less than two months later, SpaceX said that “nearly 700,000 individuals” across the United States had indicated interest in the service.
    >
    ...The network is an ambitious endeavor, which SpaceX has said will cost about $10 billion or more to build. But the company’s leadership estimate that Starlink could bring in as much as $30 billion a year, or more than 10 times the annual revenue of its rocket business.
    >

  30. #3690
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    1,482
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Starlink US pricing,

    After the FCC rural subsidy auction, and assuming SpaceX gets funding, covered customer's costs should be lower.

    And if those revenue estimates hold up, SpaceX will have 50% more income than NASA has budget.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/10/27/spac...st-begins.html
    This assumes that the 20.4 B is an all or none among the applicants. Otherwise it is a fraction of NASA's budget. Even if it were split among the parties involved NASA's budget would likely be more. It is a generous amount though. Besides the company's estimate? Over what time frame is it talking about?
    Last edited by bknight; 2020-Oct-28 at 02:49 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •