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Thread: SpaceX

  1. #2521
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    BIG storm hit Boca Chica. Poles down, major lightning, power outages, hurricane force winds (100+ kts), tornado sighting over Boca Chica Village but apparently no touchdown.

    Starship Mk1's modules were undamaged, and SpaceX's Tesla Solar & PowerPack farms are providing power. Work re-started almost immediately. Landing leg mount being attached, via @BocaChicaGal

    IMG_20191021_120808.jpg

    https://twitter.com/BocaChicaGal/sta...04669724921856

  2. #2522
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    Road & beach closures in Boca Chica due to SpaceX test activities

    Oct 30: 2000-2100 Eastern
    Nov 2* - Nov 4: 1300-2100 Eastern
    Nov 7* - Nov 8: 1300-2100 Eastern
    Nov 12: 1300-2100 Eastern

    * = Primary date

  3. #2523
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    SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell at Barron's investor conference.

    Key item not in CNBC's story but in the tweets: SpaceX has ~1,500 StarLink satellites ready to launch.

    They need 1,200 for worldwide StarLink coverage, are already producing user terminals for SpaceX employees to test, and their announced schedule would fly 1,600+ StarLinks by the end of 2020.

    Michael Sheetz ✔ @thesheetztweetz
    Replying to @thesheetztweetz
    Shotwell: Next year we're going to be 60 Starlink satellites "every other week."

    "Once we get to 1200 satellites we will have coverage of the whole globe."
    |
    Michael Sheetz ✔ @thesheetztweetz
    Baron: How many satellites do we have right now?

    Shotwell: About 1500.
    CNBC's tweetstorm

    https://twitter.com/thesheetztweetz/...41337455648768

    CNBC story

    https://www.cnbc.com/amp/2019/10/25/...in-oneweb.html

    SpaceX president knocks Bezos' Blue Origin: 'They have a billion dollars of free money every year'
    >

  4. #2524
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    StarLink's satellite-to-satellite laser interlinks go live next year, closing the mesh constellation.

    Gwynne Shotwell,

    CNN...

    >
    The 60 satellites that we already flew are capable of operations, but the next version will have upgraded technology. By late next year, we'll be flying satellite with lasers that allow them to talk to each other in space and share data, which ensures customers will never lose service.
    >
    In countries where we can, we are likely to go directly to consumers. We'll have the full team of salespeople and tech support. Though, the better engineering that we do on the user terminal, the less service people we will need.
    >

  5. #2525
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    First hard number for StarLinks/Starship.

    Shotwell at the Baron Fund investor conference in NYC.

    CNBC...

    >
    Once SpaceX is flying Starship regularly, she said the rocket will be able to launch nearly seven times as many Starlink satellites at once.

    "Starship can take 400 satellites at a time," Shotwell said.
    >

  6. #2526
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    Massive 1950s-ish rocket launching hundreds of satellites that connect via laser beams.

    Are we absolutely certain that Musk isn’t a Bond villain? Because, this sounds like something a Bond villain would do.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I may have many faults, but being wrong ain't one of them. - Jimmy Hoffa

  7. #2527
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    As long as he doesn't refer to it as "a so-called LASER" while doing the pinky thing, we're safe.
    Last edited by Nicolas; 2019-Oct-28 at 12:38 PM.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  8. #2528
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    As long as he doesn't refer to it as "a so-called LASER" while doing the pinky thing, we're safe.
    His Twitter profile pic at one time.

    Musk-Blofeld-640.jpg

  9. #2529
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    His Twitter profile pic at one time.

    Musk-Blofeld-640.jpg
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

    All moderation in purple - The rules

  10. #2530
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    I have also been amused with comparisons between Elon Musk and Tony Stark and Jeff Bezos and Lex Luther.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  11. #2531
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    Quote Originally Posted by Van Rijn View Post
    I have also been amused with comparisons between Elon Musk and Tony Stark and Jeff Bezos and Lex Luther.
    There's a bit of truth in each.

  12. #2532
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    Lars Blackmore, rocket landing guru, via Cambridge, MIT, and hired from NASA JPL

    landscapeheadshotresized.jpg

    http://www.eng.cam.ac.uk/news/alumni...ngineer-spacex

    Meet the principal rocket landing engineer at SpaceX

    From a young age, Lars Blackmore was interested in space travel and had a goal to one day work on electronics for spacecraft. Its been a journey thats led him from studying Engineering at Cambridge to completing a PhD in Aeronautics and Astronautics at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), before going on to land engineering roles at both NASA and SpaceX.

    Lars is currently the Principal Rocket Landing Engineer for SpaceX's Falcon 9 - the first orbital class rocket capable of reflight. He is responsible for the entry, descent and landing of the rocket and his next project will see him leading the entry and landing for Starship - SpaceX's next-generation, fully reusable rocket with room for up to 100 passengers. The destination? The Moon and Mars, of course!

    We caught up with Lars for a chat about the world of precision rocket landing, his career to date, and why internships are so important.
    >
    >

    https://youtu.be/bvim4rsNHkQ

    https://youtu.be/ANv5UfZsvZQ

  13. #2533
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    Mary @BocaChicaGal
    A morning video from SpaceX, Boca Chica assembly. The work crew are busy preparing Starship Mk1 for it's trip to the launch site tomorrow.
    @NASASpaceflight

    https://twitter.com/bocachicagal/sta...69933164449792

  14. #2534
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post


    Mary @BocaChicaGal
    A morning video from SpaceX, Boca Chica assembly. The work crew are busy preparing Starship Mk1 for it's trip to the launch site tomorrow.
    @NASASpaceflight

    https://twitter.com/bocachicagal/sta...69933164449792
    What is the launch profile for the next?

  15. #2535
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    What is the launch profile for the next?
    Vertical launch to 20,000 meters (65,616 feet) then do a skydiver entry. This means coming in belly-first in a free-fall at terminal velocity, about 67 meters/sec, then rotating to vertical at <_1,000 meters and firing the engines for a landing.

    SpaceX simulation
    https://youtu.be/94TUSNxX01c

  16. #2536
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Vertical launch to 20,000 meters (65,616 feet) then do a skydiver entry. This means coming in belly-first in a free-fall at terminal velocity, about 67 meters/sec, then rotating to vertical at <3,000 meters and firing the engines for a landing.
    Thanks, any idea of when the attempt will be made?

  17. #2537
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    They're estimating before the end of the year, but before then they need to pressure test the tanks, then do wet dress rehersals using super-chilled cryogenic liquid methane and liquid oxygen. Super-chilled LOX is about 66° Kelvin, -207° C, -340° F

  18. #2538
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Vertical launch to 20,000 meters (65,616 feet) then do a skydiver entry. This means coming in belly-first in a free-fall at terminal velocity, about 67 meters/sec, then rotating to vertical at <_1,000 meters and firing the engines for a landing.

    SpaceX simulation
    https://youtu.be/94TUSNxX01c
    What, no hopping first? They are really going for it.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  19. #2539
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    They're estimating before the end of the year, but before then they need to pressure test the tanks, then do wet dress rehersals using super-chilled cryogenic liquid methane and liquid oxygen. Super-chilled LOX is about 66° Kelvin, -207° C, -340° F
    It should be an exciting launch.

  20. #2540
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    It should be an exciting launch.
    True, but not nearly as exciting as the landing. If they pull this off on the first attempt I will be extremely impressed.

  21. #2541
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    What, no hopping first? They are really going for it.
    They may or may not do a short hop first, but yeah - SpaceX has big brass ones. Of having things crash & make smoking craters Musk once said,

    "Failure is an option here. If things are not failing, you are not innovating enough."

    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    It should be an exciting launch.
    Hell yeah!

    Mary @BocaChicaGal
    Starship Mk1's bottom section has been moved onto the Roll-Lift crawler.
    @NASASpaceflight

    EIEjI-VW4AUD8od.jpeg

    https://twitter.com/BocaChicaGal/sta...70430324002819
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2019-Oct-29 at 08:53 PM.

  22. #2542
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    What, no hopping first? They are really going for it.
    I don't think they want to risk losing or damaging the vehicle before they can test the skydiver control setup, that being the main reason for Mk1 to exist. So, probably the usual static tests, and then straight to the 20 km test, which very well may be its only flight even if it lands safely.

  23. #2543
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    They may or may not do a short hop first, but yeah - SpaceX has big brass ones. Of having things crash & make smoking craters Musk once said,

    "Failure is an option here. If things are not failing, you are not innovating enough."



    Hell yeah!

    Mary @BocaChicaGal
    Starship Mk1's bottom section has been moved onto the Roll-Lift crawler.
    @NASASpaceflight

    EIEjI-VW4AUD8od.jpeg

    https://twitter.com/BocaChicaGal/sta...70430324002819
    And it STILL looks all crude and wrinkly-crinkly!

    I'm thinking I should invest in a company that makes big ol' cranes.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  24. #2544
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    And it STILL looks all crude and wrinkly-crinkly!

    I'm thinking I should invest in a company that makes big ol' cranes.
    It doesn't need to be pretty, just prove the Skydiver concept. With Mk3 and Mk4 we'll start seeing "smooth" because of the one-piece polished rings, which look like these,

    Cocoa-Oct-11-2019-crop2.jpg

    The big effing crane is a Liebherr 11200-9. Load capacity 1200 tonnes, max. hoist height 188 meters (with extension).

  25. #2545
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    I'm thinking I should invest in a company that makes big ol' cranes.


    Too late, our company has a 5000t high precision Liebherr. Floating.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  26. #2546
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    It doesn't need to be pretty, just prove the Skydiver concept. With Mk3 and Mk4 we'll start seeing "smooth" because of the one-piece polished rings, which look like these,

    Cocoa-Oct-11-2019-crop2.jpg

    The big effing crane is a Liebherr 11200-9. Load capacity 1200 tonnes, max. hoist height 188 meters (with extension).
    Is the one to the lower right one section and then the middle lower two sections? If so has the height of one section been published?

  27. #2547
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    The roll steel is 1.8m wide, and some rings in view are already 2 stacked 1.8m rings. That'll speed Mk3, Mk4 and Super Heavy construction.

    Starship Mk1's propulsion module heading for the pad

    Mk1 at pad 10-30-19-1.jpeg

    https://youtu.be/S73cpO35D-4
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2019-Oct-30 at 01:55 PM.

  28. #2548
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    Via LabPadre stream, the Mk1 propulsion module is on the launch platform. This is a Phase 1 platform, similar to what's going in at LC-39A at KSC. Phase 2 will be a much larger platform capable of launching up to a Super Heavy-Starship stack.

    Boca_Mk1_pad_2019-10-30-14-43-36.jpeg

  29. #2549
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    I hardly know where to begin....😵😈

    Chris G - NSF @ChrisG_NSF
    NASA noting they are 1% over the allowable Ignition Overpresssure of the SRBs on SLS even with the Sound Suppresion System. Issue is with Orion. They expect a waiver for Artemis 1. That overpressure is an issue. It nearly crippled Columbia on STS-1. 1/2 #NAC #HEO
    ||
    Will have to do more wind tunnel testing. Might have to requal Orion hardware or resigned [redesign?] SLS outer mold line. 2/2 #NAC #HEO
    ||
    3/2 --- They believe they can close that gap in the overpressure ahead of Artemis 2. But the requal or redesign are options if they can't.

    https://twitter.com/ChrisG_NSF/statu...93819098075136

  30. #2550
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    Yes, let's launch an SRB slightly beyond its design limits. What could go wrong. And let's solve a problem known since 1981 after that flight. And meanwhile, let's be very critical about that other company with their shabby barges, hired cranes and oversized chair launch platforms that actually gets things done.

    OK, that was hyperbole and I'm sure that in NASA too there are truckloads of incredibly talented engineers doing their very best and getting things done. But something in the overall approach there is not quite optimal.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

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