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Thread: SpaceX

  1. #3151
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    At least they seem to have figured out when they are doing the next Starlink launch. It was originally today, then moved up to yesterday, then back to tomorrow, or maybe back to today. Yesterday Heavens Above and Space Flight Insider had completely conflicting information. Now they've settled on tomorrow at 4:39 PM Eastern.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  2. #3152
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swift View Post
    Reminds me of this Calvin & Hobbes
    I laughed and laughed and laughed. One of my favorite issues from that comic. Thank you.
    Do good work. —Virgil Ivan "Gus" Grissom

  3. #3153
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    Time To Re-think, Elon

    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    While that might be visually exciting, I would hope for a good series of tests.
    "We choose to do this, not because it is easy, but because it is hard." - JFK

  4. #3154
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    Starlink 9 slipped to June 26 at 1618 Eastern, but static fire yesterday at LC-39A

    GPS III SV03 static fire today at LC-40, scheduled for June 30.

    Jeezzzz...bang-bang static fires on successive days

  5. #3155
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    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Starlink 9 slipped to June 26 at 1618 Eastern, but static fire yesterday at LC-39A

    GPS III SV03 static fire today at LC-40, scheduled for June 30.

    Jeezzzz...bang-bang static fires on successive days
    Do you know the testing schedule at Boca Chica this/next week?

  6. #3156
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    Last I heard, road closures for June 29 & 30, and July 1.

  7. #3157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    At least they seem to have figured out when they are doing the next Starlink launch. It was originally today, then moved up to yesterday, then back to tomorrow, or maybe back to today. Yesterday Heavens Above and Space Flight Insider had completely conflicting information. Now they've settled on tomorrow at 4:39 PM Eastern.
    Quote Originally Posted by docmordrid View Post
    Starlink 9 slipped to June 26 at 1618 Eastern, but static fire yesterday at LC-39A
    Clearly I spoke too soon!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  8. #3158
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    SpaceX's Principal Integration Engineer "Big John" Insprucker says they may start doing double launches, with two vehicles counting down at once.

    Insprucker is a retired USAF Colonel who managed the Atlas V and Delta IV programs at Vandenberg AFB before joining SpaceX in 2006. He oversaw the development of Falcon 9.

    https://twitter.com/jinsprucker/stat...09105875558400

  9. #3159
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    I don't think launching two F9's would be a lot more challenging than one F9H.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  10. #3160
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    But are they actually suggesting launching at the same time? Or are talking about counting down at the same time but somewhat offset launches? For Starlink and just for range safety would it even make sense to launch at the same time?

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

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  11. #3161
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    For instantaneous launch windows it would make sense but I don't think Starlink has those.

    Simultaneous countdown up to a certain point close to launch would make sense as many aspects such as weather and range safety could easily be shared.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  12. #3162
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    The window for today's Starlink launch is shown as instantaneous on Spaceflight Insider. "Launch Window: One second".
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  13. #3163
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    StarLink 9 webcast

    https://youtu.be/KU6KogxG5BE

  14. #3164
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    From space.com
    Update for 2 p.m. EDT (1800 GMT): SpaceX has called off today's Starlink/BlackSky launch due to "additional time for pre-launch checkouts." A new launch date will be determined later.
    At night the stars put on a show for free (Carole King)

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  15. #3165
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trebuchet View Post
    The window for today's Starlink launch is shown as instantaneous on Spaceflight Insider. "Launch Window: One second".
    OK, in that case you would launch them simultaneously. I'm not very knowledgeable on orbital mechanics, but I'd think that the actual launch window would be several seconds, given how the 60 satellites are released and then parked into their final orbits. For a single launch that doesn't matter, because a single hold in the final minute would shift them beyond the launch window anyway, so you de facto only have one chance.
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  16. #3166
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    I don’t understand why they would want to launch two sets of starlink satellites into near the same point in the same orbit at the same time, so I don’t see why they would need to launch at the exact same time. I can see an advantage in launching close in time to simplify operations and improve throughput.

    "The problem with quotes on the Internet is that it is hard to verify their authenticity." — Abraham Lincoln

    I say there is an invisible elf in my backyard. How do you prove that I am wrong?

    The Leif Ericson Cruiser

  17. #3167
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    Perhaps Elon is totally into drag racing?
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  18. #3168
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    Spitballing,

    Launch a Crew Dragon and early Crew Starship? Dock in orbit and do a checkout mission with SS. Launch and return the crew in a proven vehicle until Starship launch/landing safety is established.

    This is similar to how NASA will be doing Gateway missions; astros aunch in Orion, fly to Gateway, transfer to a Crew Lander, do mission, go back to Gateway and return in Orion.
    Last edited by docmordrid; 2020-Jun-28 at 01:10 AM.

  19. #3169
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicolas View Post
    For instantaneous launch windows it would make sense .
    There is another reason. There has been no footage of the side view of a launch vehicle during its life cycle.

    Each stage can now watch the other for the whole duration of a launch.

    That has never before been attempted.

    One other thing I want to see done. I want to see a camera-equipped F-15 pull up right as a Falcon launches.
    The rocket and jet both have camera blisters operated from the base.

    The point?

    To show fighter pilots and the public just what rockets can really do.
    Seeing a huge rocket just blow past that jet would be astounding.

    The jet could be a drone and fly into the exhaust.
    Ground-only footage just doesn’t do rockets justice.

    The result?
    To show off why a space is different from aviation—and help give space advocates a voice.

    To far too many...jets and rockets just get lumped together as two metal dots seen from ground level that fly high.
    Last edited by publiusr; 2020-Jun-28 at 05:47 AM.

  20. #3170
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    Just because they can have two in countdown at the same time doesn't mean they would launch at the same time, I'm thinking. They've got a GPS launch coming up Tuesday, and a Starlink launch to be rescheduled. What if they did them half an hour or so apart?

    Meanwhile, I just watched a couple of Boca Chica videos and am NOT understanding the enormous blue crane that's being assembled. Maybe there are two of them? I should look it up....

    Ok, back. Here's an image gallery. Maybe it's getting one of those complicated top arrangements.
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  21. #3171
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    Bear in mind that the launch platform will be ~30 meters tall, and the SH/SS stack will be 120-126 meters tall (17.25 or 22 meter payload bay.) Now add the massive launch tower above the deck, work clearance and the huge hammerhead integration crane at the top. They'll be doing work at nearly 200 meters above ground level no mater how you slice it.

    Official concept
    Starship-Super-Heavy-2019.png

  22. #3172
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    If you cut the grass at 3cm, that is nearly 6700 football fields high! [/network television news]
    With sufficient thrust, water towers fly just fine.

  23. #3173
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    Next-Gen GPS satellite launch for the US Space Force

    Launch date: June 30
    Launch time: 1555-1610 Eastern (1955-2010 GMT)
    Pad: LC-40
    Booster recovery: ASDS
    Fairing recovery: Ms Tree, Ms Chief

    https://youtu.be/6zr0nfG3Xy4

  24. #3174
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    Pressure testing SN-05 tonight

    LabPadre stream
    https://www.youtube.com/labpadre/live

  25. #3175
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    SN-05 had successful ambient temp and cryogenic pressure tests last night, including simulated thrust applied to the thrust structure (huge hydraulic jacks).

    Next up, they'll remove the hacks and install at least one Raptor engine for a static fire.

    --------

    Customer: South Korean military
    Satellite: ANASIS-II, aka URC-700K

    Launch date: July 13, 2020.
    Launch time: TBA
    Pad: LC-39A
    Recovery: ASDS
    Booster: B1058.2 (Crew Dragon DM-2)
    Orbit: GTO
    Satellite bus: Eurostar E3000

  26. #3176
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    I briefly skimmed through a video of the pressure test and noticed at least 2 deformations during the later part of the test. I wonder if this is a cause of concern for SpaceX or if it is within expected performance norms.

  27. #3177
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    I've been noticing big dents in SN/5 since they rolled it out. Perhaps they popped them out!
    Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.

  28. #3178
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    To clarify, the deformations I was referring to formed during the test. They formed pretty quickly at some point late in the test, I would guess when the tanks were being depressurized but I don't know for certain.

  29. #3179
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  30. #3180
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    Quote Originally Posted by bknight View Post
    NIMBYs saying NIMBY. A Falcon Heavy load of RP-1 is a tremendously greater environmental threat than a Starship load of liquid methane, especially in a wetlands area. An accidental release of the latter will immediately evaporate and disperse, a major RP-1 spill would require a massive cleanup project.

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